Cordless phones

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I've heard conflicting findings. I may very well be a myth.
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If the batteries are NiCad's, the memory effect is NOT a myth. Ask anyone who flies radio control aircraft and uses or used to use NiCad's.
I used to use NiCad batteries with my aircraft and regular "cycling" of the batteries with a battery cycler extended the useful life of the batteries and kept the capacity of the batteries to near new condition.

Unless there are protective circuits in the device being used, running a battery down to zero is not a very good idea and could actually kill a rechargeable battery very quickly.

Follow the instructions that came with your device regarding batteries. My electric shaver has an auto shut down so that the battery doesn't go to zero before charging and it is recommended to let the shaver discharge to auto shutdown regularly before recharging.
The instructions given will depend upon the type of batteries you are using.
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On Aug 4, 8:25 pm, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Not really. It was a trick that was used on early NiCads but is not recommended for any battery currently made that I know of. It might not be bad IF you are discharging a single cell and not a battery of cells, but frankly it is not worth much at best. Back in the early days of Polaroid's with electronic flashes, I was able to bring quite a few of them back to life for a short while (time measured in weeks at best) so the owner might get through the birthday party or whatever, but it always ended up with new batteries.
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wrote:

If you spend a lot of time talking on the cordless phone, this might not be true, but otherwise, if you can get an old phone with an on/off switch, you'll be better off.
On current phones the switch goes from standby to on, but the phone is always in receive mode, running down the battery.
On old phones, when the switch was Off, the phone was off. No current was used from the battery. It wouldn't ring, but you can still hear one of the wired phones ringing, pick up the phone and turn it on to talk.
Getting rid of the on-off switch strikes me as stupid. If new phones use so much less battery power that they stay charged for 5 days without the on-off switch, instead of one day some time ago, the new phones would stay charged for 20 with an on/off switch.

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Yeah, but this way "they" can *always* know where you are. Might that be the reason for no more switch?
David
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David Combs wrote:

If you read the fine print there's generally a way to power down the phone, if you're talking cellular, rather than putting it in standby. But I believe the discussion was of the kind of phone that has a hard-wired base unit and a handset that can be used within a few hundred feet of the base. The only people who are going to track you with one of those would be your parents.
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Like someone else in this thread mentioned Uniden (http:// www.uniden.com) . I've had nothing but good luck with them. Planning on purchasing a new set of four. Separate chargers on all of them, running from the same base unit.
Previously had Panasonic and General Electric. Both died an early death.
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Aren't these the guys who make (or used to make) a "two-line" phone?
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Those batteries probably only need reconditioning and are not dead. Too bad they dont make the plain old AA batteries. Likely because they want you to keep buying from the... Plenty of reconditioning devices for AA and AAA batteries, I dont know any for phone batteries though.
Most newer phones should not have too much of a problem. Anyway, why are you trying to get batteries to last 4 days? Is there no charger around? I would change my brand of phone. My panasonic I have had for about 5 years and the batteries will last at least 4 hours. i dont talk that much though.
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MiamiCuse wrote:

I had nicad batteries in my cordless phone that lasted for many years. I leave them on the charger all the time. One cordless phone I put away for a few years while I had cell only. Took it out of storage, plugged it in and back in business again, batteries at least 7 years old. It's back in storage again, I'm back to cell only again. I can no longer have a phone that I can't take with me everywhere I go.
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On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 08:17:43 -0400, Claude Hopper

I wish I could do that. However, the cellular reception is real bad here. About .3 of the time, there's no signal. The rest of the time, calls are full of dropouts. The situation outside is only SLIGHTLY better.
BTW, this is in town and the signal is very good miss than a mile north, and less than a mile south of here (business areas).
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