copper tubing under cement...

Hi,
I'm gonna be replacing the 60-yr-old 3/8" copper tubing that runs through our concrete basement floor from the oil tank to the burner. I'm gonna chisel out the old stuff, clean-up the channel, and then re-bury the new tubing with concrete.
Anyway, from what I understand it's advisable to first encase it in some type of outer plastic tubing or conduit to prevent corrosion (that's why I'm replacing the stuff that's there). Any recommendations?
Thanks, JohnB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

never gets above 140 deg. near the burner.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the info, guys. Actually, I already have my new tubing running ACROSS the floor for now so that we have hot water in the meantime, so I don't wanna have to buy more tubing that comes with the cover. Also, the channel isn't a straight line - so rigid PVC isn't really an option.
I probably can just get some type of plastic tubing/hose of the proper diameter and slip it over the copper before I cover it w/ concrete. The 20-year-old kid who works in the Plumbing/HVAC aisles at my local Home Depot actually is quite knowledgeable, so I guess I can just ask him what type would work for me.
Thanks again! JohnB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Here in AZ where houses are slab-on-grade, copper water piping is wrapped with tape made for the purpose. There is also a primer available that seems to be pretty much additional adhesive.
And, you never want a joint under concrete.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is Turtle.
You can get K type Soft Copper tubing with a plastic cover to lay in concrete. Lay it and forget it.
TURTLE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In the past, I have buried some polyethylene water pipe with the copper tube threaded in through it. The 1/2" size will hold 3/8" copper tube, or 3/4" if you have a long run and want it easy to pull. The poly pipe comes in 100 foot lengths, is cheap and is reasonably flexible to curve out of the concrete at each end and to go around any obstructions although you may have to stake or strap it into place where you make a tighter curve than the material naturally wants.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Go to a plumbing supply They make a plastic sleeve ( looks like a small fire hose/Blue) slide that over the pipe. If you are going to imbed it in the concrete Then you might want to wrap it with foam pipe wrap. Comes in a roll, 1/8 thick,6" wide. You could also use tem-mill tape. If you are imbedding it in concrete expansion and contraction would be a concern. As mentioned sliding it threw PVC would be good if you ever had to replace it , If you have any tight bends it could be a problem. Defiantly soft roll, you don't want any joints in or under slab. If this can not be avoided joints should be brazed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to *all* for the great info.
I ended up getting a 10' piece of 5/8" H/C Pex pipe (1/2" i.d.) - it looks like white polyethylene. It's almost as rigid as PVC (which will allow me to pull the copper tubing out if I ever need to replace it), but flexible enough to lay in my curved channel.
Now the fun part of chiseling out the channel and the old tubing. Actually, I think I'll use a masonry blade on either side of the channel to get a nice clean edge, and then remove the rest with a masonry chisel. Fun fun...
thanks again, JohnB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.