Copper to galvanized pipe question

Question: Have a 3/4" copper to galvanized pipe junction, has a 6" brass nipple between them. Is this the proper way to do this to prevent electrolysis?
Other than on a water heater, when would one use an electrically isolated union? And why?
Al
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should be dia electric union. the better question why havent ypu replaced the galvanized ?? PEX is CHEAP and EASY TO WORK WITH!
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wrote:

should be dia electric union. the better question why havent ypu replaced the galvanized ?? PEX is CHEAP and EASY TO WORK WITH!
PEX is CHEAP but rodents love it.
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PEX is CHEAP...... that's all that needs to be said.
s
wrote:

should be dia electric union. the better question why havent ypu replaced the galvanized ?? PEX is CHEAP and EASY TO WORK WITH!
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On Nov 27, 7:27�am, "Steve Barker DLT"

individuaL RUN TO EACH OUTLET IS A GREAT SIDE EFFECT TO pex.
plus it routes easily around obstructions, like a beam in the way
heck romex is cheaper than K&T so K&T must be better?
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In many, many ways, yes it was.
s
heck romex is cheaper than K&T so K&T must be better?
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Copper, PEX & PVC all have their place in properly designed & installed "plumbing" systems.
I have used (& use) all three or a mix of them, depending on the situation.
All three have their advantages & disadvantages (even copper has some downside, besides cost).
I always favored copper (before & after the recent price spike) but once I used PEX, my opinion changed. I still use copper and often do the copper / PEX hybrid thing.
Don't dismiss PEX, cuz' it's plastic or "cheap"...the system has a lot of advantages over copper, even soft copper.
cheers Bob
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Has anyone noticed copper pipe prices dropping? The metal recyclers are paying a lot less for copper.
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On Nov 29, 12:52�pm, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

copper sometimes gets attacked by water and leaks insde walls etc.... PEX doesnt have that problem and can stand repeated freezing and thawing
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Brass is neutral metal and will work.
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Sac Dave wrote:

I'd love to hear what makes you think brass is a "neutral metal", Sac Dave.
Have you ever even bothered to look at a galvanic table?
Try spending some time reading articles like this one:
http://tinyurl.com/5sekem
before you hand out totally incorect advice.
*******
Regarding the OP's mention of water heaters, the use of dielectric unions on them is passe, as stated by Rheem in this bulletin:
http://tinyurl.com/5e56ub
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Although I realize that this is not a group organized to further literacy the first sentence of the Rheem bulletin is not one that portends great understanding.
The second sentence is more worrisome. "... a shut-off valve in at least the cold inlet waterline is recommended,..." Where would another other shut-off valve be placed? In the only other waterline, the hot water outlet? This is an implied prescription for a bomb, and violates every plumbing code that I'm familiar with.
The rest of the piece is an attempt at explaining electrochemistry which is much better done in a plethora of texts.

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-snip-

Since that's how mine is done I'm curious. How is having a shutoff at the tank any more dangerous than the normal shutoffs at the faucets?
Can you cite a code that forbids it? Or better yet- an incident where a [preferably open as that is the normal state] valve on the hot side caused an explosion?
I agree that it is a minimal advantage, but I'm glad that whoever did mine, did it this way. When I work on the hot water lines I shut just them down.
Thanks, Jim
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Boden wrote:

I won't quibble with you about plumbing codes, as I'm not a mavin about them, and it is not unreasonable to expect they'd prohibit hot side shutoff valves on water heaters.
But how did you come up with "This is an implied prescription for a bomb"?
Can you answer these questions?
Do you know what a T&P valve is and why they're code required on water heaters?
How is having a closed shut off valve on the hot side of a water heater significantly different than having all "hot" faucets downstream of the water heater closed, as they usually are for many hours at a time in an average household?
Now please defend your "bomb" statement.
*********************************************
BTW, dielectric unions do have their uses in specific situations. One application I remember is the need to use them in natural gas lines when they enter a building.
Back in the days when all gas mains buried under streets were iron pipe (pre-plastic pipe era.) "impressed current cathodic protection systems" were used to prevent corrosion of those mains.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathodic_protection#Impressed_current_CP
Dielectric unions were installed ahead of the gas lines where they entered buildings to avoid having gas appliances (such as water heaters) from shorting those electrified gas mains to ground.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Jeff Wisnia posted for all of us...

Muntz metal heh heh heh!
--
Tekkie Don\'t bother to thank me, I do this as a public service.

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