Copper prices

Page 1 of 3  
Possibly already been argued ad nauseum, but what the heck is making copper so damned expensive? I priced out Romex, now that I will be able to re-wire my newly grounded box, and its outrageous. $146 dollars for 10/2 x 250 ft? What's worse, 100 feet is less than half the cost, and 1000 feet is a tad (like 10 bucks) under 4 times the cost. Don't even talk to me about 12/2 or 14/2. It ain't cheaper to get more now, it sure was 2 months ago.
Copper pipe is just as bad. What's happened in the world that has made copper such a valuable commodity? Please don't tell me the war in Iraq, 'cause that's BS.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have you heard about China? It is a big country overseas. They are starting to make some goods to sell in the US. If you look around hard enough, you may find some items made there.
Price some steel pie too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
yeah china sucking up copper they are becoming a major exporter and buying raw materials.........
i think we should open the borders let companies pay sub minimum wages to new immigrants and start manufacturing and exporting to places like china.
go to fair tax elminate the IRS so exported goods are more competive.
At some point the US economy will collapse because we will build nothing.......
Having no one to sell to but ourselves our economy will go bust and social security will collapse.
Pork spending and lack of exports our economy is a house of cards and the wind is picking up.
OPEN THE BORDERS TO EVERYONE BUT CRIMINALS AND EX[PAND THE US ECONOMY!!!!!!!!!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, but we'll have casinos. When Electric Boat laid off thousands of workers they were employed by the casinos in about a year. So what if the pay cut was about $19 an hour.
By 2036 we'll have half the country collecting social security and the other half running casinos for the old people to go to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com spake thus:

That's right. I almost went to work for a metal recycling company here in Oakland; most of their stuff gets shipped to either China or, surprisingly, Vietnam. Big markets over there for our old ground-up cars and fridges and stuff.
--
Napoleon won the battle of Waterloo. The German Wehrmacht won World War
II. The United States won in Vietnam, and the Soviets in Afghanistan.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Simple supply and demand. When supply was plentiful, mines shut down as prices are too low to justify operation. Then when the supply gets tight, prices rise. It takes time to get mines back into production (as well as the right price point) so hence, you end up with low supply and what seems like high demand for awhile. It'll come back down just as soon as more mines get back online and start increasing the supply. China is a part of the demand picture but is certainly not the only country demanding copper. Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Sep 2006 21:13:37 -0600, "James \\"Cubby\\" Culbertson"

Actually, copper will NEVER come back down in price. Not in your life time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Oh it will. Every commodity does once the supply/demand evens out and it won't take 40-50 years to happen. There's over 100 years of supply available to be mined, it's just a matter of waiting for the mining companies to get at it. As more supply enters the market, prices will drop. Part of what we're seeing is also a function of market investment driving prices up too. Considering most commodities were at their lowest price in decades (inflation adjusted), it may take a bit longer to come down but it will, and I should definitely be around to see it. Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 09:43:38 -0600, "James \\"Cubby\\" Culbertson"

And you never know when they're going to invent cheap synthetic copper.
--
92 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Lloyd wrote:

That's already been done. Check out pennies since 1982 -- aluminum core!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I heard that in the 70s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am an investment planner in precious metals and energies markets. For the last year or so, the whole precious metals market and the energies have being going up. Just in the last few weeks these commodities have dropped a number of points, but this is going to only be temporary.
In the last 5 years, the average cost of gold has been increased from 280 US to 560 US average price per ounce. This works to about 40% per year average. Gold is the basic leader for the metals markets in general. Metals like Zinc, copper, and silver are considered low end precious or semi-precious metals. Aluminums is not far behind, since its cost to produce is going up very strongly. By-the-way, in case you are interested, if you put your money in a quality gold mining company about 5 years ago, it would be worth more than 200% today in comparison to what you started with.
You can see the gold charts here: http://www.kitco.com/charts/livegold.html
In the Far East and in China, there is a tremendous industrial growth going on. It is far greater than what we can imagine over in North America or in Europe. All the large corporations are starting to manufacture most everything over there. There are incredibly large markets opening up in Asia, Russia, South Africa, and other areas. The North American and European consumer markets are actually shrinking. These manufactures need many types of materials, oil, and most of the available precious metals to do their manufacturing. Most of the zinc, copper, gold, and silver, end up in the electronics industry. The mining industries are having a difficult time to keep up with the orders for the metals. They have expressions, that say that they cannot get the minerals out of the ground fast enough for their customers. Or, the metals are sold before they come out from the ground.
Some of the factors that effect the metals markets are the world US dollar value, the inflation, the US interest rates, the demand for the metals, and also the political stability.
During unstable times, many of the large investors start putting their money in to gold, thus driving the gold price up. The other metals generally follow, because all the markets are related in many ways. The price of oil also follows up and down in a near pattern to that of the gold. Every day, there are millions of shares being bought and sold in the oil and precious metals. When there is a lot of buying of these commodities, the price generally goes up.
This explanation only touches on the subject to give you an idea. The exact detailed reasons for the movement of the metals and energy commodities prices is fairly complex to explain in a simple email text.
Mark down the prices of what you are paying in the store for the copper pieces. In a few years from now, take in your note pad, and make the comparison. You should see a big difference.
--

JANA
_____


"Eigenvector" <m44 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not even close. For an investment planner, your math skills leave a bit to be desired. An investment that doubles in price in 5 years has gone up a bit less than 15% per year, not 40%. Conversely, a commodity that was priced at $280 five years ago, and has appreciated 40% annually, is now worth $1506.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<bullshit and bad math snipped out of respect for reality>
Thanks, Buddy. I'll keep mine in first deeds if it's okay with you.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote Re Re: Copper prices:

And if you had put your money in gold 25 years ago you would have lost your ass.
--
Slimes-Daily motto: 1) Tax and Spend, 2) Change the Constitution to make it
easier to do (1).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eigenvector wrote:

Commodity (oil, copper, pork bellies, pornography, coffee, etc.) prices follow the rule: "rocket up, feather down."
Disruptions in the supply/demand ratio cause prices to rise dramatically and, as production catches up with demand, prices ooze down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and that takes copper. It is pretty much like oil.
All I know is that I had 470' of 12/2 on Craigslist for weeks now for $75 and no one wants it. Go figure. (I bought it at garage sales for $20 and have way more than I will ever use)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just cant see that. While China and India may be modernizing, they have their own supply of metals to draw from and they've been doing so for years - so it's not just that. That is one part of the equation yes, not all of it. No matter how dramatic the demand has risen, it hasn't risen enough to make the price of 250' 12/2 Romex jump from $89 to $140+ in 2 months - that's more than 50%.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They are not producing enough to supply their own needs. It's that simple. They are drawing on the supply generated elsewhere and driving prices up. And to your statement that "it hasn't risen enough to make the price of 250' 12/2 Romex jump from $89 to $140+ in 2 months - that's more than 50%." .... obviously it has or the price wouldn't be as you quoted. When mines start producing more or new mines finally come on line, you'll see prices drop, albeit it may take a while.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.