Copper Pipes / Electrical Panel Clearance

In my basement there is a cold water pipe (copper) that is approximately 1.5 feet in front of my electrical panel. It seems awfully close. Does code allow pipes to be ran this close?
Amy
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On Sat, 10 Jan 2009 16:41:38 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@paxemail.com wrote:

If this is higher than 6'8" it is probably OK. The only concern is if it would leak and drip into the panel. Being 1.5 feet away that is probably not an issue either.
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The NEC requires three feet clear working space in front of a panel. An electrical inspector can make exceptions if there is a hardship, but your situation sounds like laziness on the part of a plumber
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Not enough details to make a statement like that. If, by in front, he means it runs across the ceiling and the box is a couple of feet below it mounted to the wall, I don't see any laziness. A better description or photo would help.
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.
For clarification the panel is mounted on the wall. The pipe runs parallel to the box but 1.5 feet in front of in. So if you were standing in front of the panel looking directly at it the pipe is above your head (not over the panel).
Hope this helps, Amy
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snipped-for-privacy@paxemail.com wrote:

No, it does not help. You still haven't told us what the height of the pipe is, either above the floor or relative to the height of the panel. "Over your head" is not an adequate description: what's over *your* head might not be over *mine*.
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On Jan 11, 1:39pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Sorry, the pipe is mounted to the basement (non finished) rafters. The approx height of the joist is 7ft. The pipe is mounted to it - so that makes the pipe arond 6' 10".
The electrical panel is approximately 1 foot below the ceiling. However, all the wires extend out from the top into the ceiling to various locations in the house.
Amy.
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snipped-for-privacy@paxemail.com wrote:

In that case, you're good.
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On Jan 11, 3:03pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Thank you, Amy
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parallel to the box but 1.5 feet in front of in. So if you were standing in front of the panel looking directly at it the pipe is above your head (not over the panel).
Hope this helps, Amy
********************************************
Yes, that helps. If the pipe is above, and not blocking, the panel, it is OK. In my house the box is about 2' down from the ceiling and any pipe are on the ceiling and that is OK.
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Not necessarily; it depends on how far the pipe is above the floor. The Code requires clearance in front of the panel to work -- which includes sufficient space for a workman to stand up in.
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snipped-for-privacy@paxemail.com wrote:

As long as the pipe isn't a head-banger, and will not interfere with removing the front of the panel when needed, not a problem. Not ideal, but reality seldom is. I'm no code expert, but a 3-foot clear zone in front, floor to top of panel, is what 'they' always told me. Should be a common sense thing- are any pipes placed where they are likely to leak on the panel, and can an electrician get in there to make repairs as needed, without tearing anything out?
-- aem sends...
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It's not as long as your smaller than 6' 10".

If the pipe was dripping it would not drip onto the panel, but if there was a pierce or pin hole that sprayed I would think the pressure in the pipe could force it to spray the panel.

Yes. Nothing would have to be removed to work on the panel. There is plenty of clearance.
Thanks Amy
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2009 09:43:17 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@paxemail.com wrote:

I dont see any problem except moisture dripping on your head when you fix a tripped breaker. Put some insulation on the pipe, at least in that spot. Problem solved.
Jim
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Pipes are run by electrical panels all the time . I've run pipes over cable trays feeding high rises.
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