copper pipe repair


Hi all,
I have a copper water pipe behind a drywall ceiling. Turns out that when the ceiling was installed a drywall screw punctured the pipe. Many years passed until the screw rusted enough and it started dripping, causing a stain on the drywall ceiling. I listened to the recommendation of a guy on the HD floor and patched it with a metal epoxy putty. That held tight for a few years, now the stain is back.
Is there a simple way to patch this by cutting out the bad spot and using pressure fittings or something similar? I don't want to try soldering in that confined space. Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Larry
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GoHabsGo wrote:

You're looking for a compression repair coupling.
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/plumbing/article/0,16417,193178-2,00.html
Chris
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On Tue, 20 Feb 2007 12:50:31 -0600, Chris Friesen

Hijacking this thread, and wanted to say THANKS! I run accross home owners who have problems, but don't want to create more try to fix them. This is good information.
tom
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GoHabsGo wrote:

    If the hole is just a small one created by the dry wall screw, and if there is room, there is a clamp on device sold at Home Depot that clamps over the hole and seals the hole with neoprene. You might look into it.
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Ken wrote:

A screw type hose clamp and a bit of rubber will do it as well if you can't find a "tailor made" one.
Jeff
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The official name is "pipe repair clamp" which you can google. Here is an example: http://www.doityourself.com/invt/4010872
I have one of these on a pipe in my basement. When we bought the house 12 years ago I remember seeing that and thinking, "boy, what a shoddy repair, I better get to that pretty soon." It's been fine. -- H
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If you don't want to solder it, get someone that can. Given the location, there is no 100% perfect way to repair a tube in that location that you can be completely comfortable with. Cut the tubing right at the hole, sweat in a coupling and be done and be confident it will not leak like a patch could while you are away on vacation.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

Agreed. Why keep looking and wondering.....
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But, then, the guy has spent years and years and spots and spots. Why fix it right now?
Steve ;-)
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years ago and they haven't leaked yet. I did it because there wasn't room for a torch. When I tried to use the stuff last year it had gone bad; so shelf life is a big strike against it.
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Two alternatives besides the other suggestions so far...
There are repair couplings which are same as a standard coupling except don't have the ridge on the inside so you can cut the pipe, slide it on, then slide it back over the cut area where there might not be room/flexibility to get a standard coupling in.
Second, for a very tiny pinhole such as this, simply soldering the hole itself will be a permanent repair as well.
As for the torch in the area, use a piece of tin behind the pipe as a heat shield to keep the direct flame from contact w/ whatever and they'll be no problem.
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Some don't have a ridge but have a dimple, pretty small and just at one point, so make sure you get one with neither.
I wish I had known they had these when I did my water heater.

No disagreement.
I keep one of those clamp on things here for an emergency. TWo pieces, a small rubber sheet on at least one of the pieces, clamp together around the pipe with 2 (or 4?) screws, or a hook on one side and two screws on the other. Haven't needed it yet, but I make a lot of istakes. :)
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Sounds like your getting a lot of half ass advice. It sounds like the pipe is going threw a ceiling joist or attached to the side. The best bet would be to cut a section out use two slip couplings. If the pipe is running threw the joist you could cut out a 16" piece so the ends are in the open for soldering. If it's attached to the side you might have to pull it down enough to clear the joist or pry it away. It hard to tell without seeing it. If your not comfortable with solider it If you have it exposed you might call a plumber to solider it. There's a lot of other tricks, spray the wood down with a spray bottle, sheet metal shield. You don't want to do this again so do it right.
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Compression fittings (have to cut out some bad pipe) and the rubber patch can work for awhile.
Something I did awhile back was to cut a coupler length wise. Clean, flux, and wrap the coupler around the pipe. Heat gently, and flow in some solder. Worked for me, the once I tried it.
Put some aluminum foil behind the fitting, for a heat shield.
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