Cooper pipe bending limits

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We got that fixed with a Delta faucet that automagically adjusts the hot & cold flows if the pressure changes. Look into that, or change the supply lines to the toilet to 1/8" ID <grin>.
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Zootal wrote:

Did you even consider using PEX tubing for your plumbing or is copper the only plumbing material you've had experience with?
TDD
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It's a better idea. They're called 45-degree ells.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

Why do they call them 45 degrees? Look at one - it's not 45 degrees, it's 135 degrees. :-)
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Yes, I know that. I also know that if you go to a plumbing supply house and ask for a 135-degree ell they will tell you there is no such thing.
There are similar fittings known in the trade as 22.5-degree and 60-degree ells; what do you suppose are the actual angles of those?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

Hmm...the 22.5 is probably 157.5 degrees because why would you want such a tight angle? Or how often would that actually occur. I didn't know they made those - the only ones I've seen are the "45" degree bends. The 60, my first guess would be an acute angle of 60, but that is a pretty sharp bend, so the 60 is really 120 degrees?
I'm guessing that the true angle of the bend is (180 - <the numbernumber>), not zero plus the number. So a 90 is 180-90 degrees. A 45 is 180-455.
IANAP (I am not a plumber)....
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You got it; that's how they're numbered. Don't ask me *why*, though.
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Doug Miller wrote:

You are putting a 45 degree bend in the pipe - when you bend the pipe you deflect it from straight by 45 degrees.
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Well, that's about as simply put as I have seen it. But I do understand the math folks here making their point, as most time angles are measured, they are measured on the inside. And from there, it goes into reciprocals, etc. As long as the pipe fits, and everyone's using the same method of measuring, it's good.
Steve
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That's not the right type of bender for copper. If you feel that you want to try it anyway then just pack the tube full of sand before bending.
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You need an anti-scald valve. Pressure may drop, it it won't go too hot.
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Well the question here is: What sort of shower value do you have installed ???
Is it a scald protection temperature balancing type ??? If it is, your cartridge inside the valve body might need to be replaced due to build-up of crud from hard water conditions... If it isn't one, meaning you have an older home with the individual hot/cold water valves for the tub/shower, then you might want to consider installing a new scald protection shower valve...
~~ Evan
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It's one of those constant volume valves, where you can't control how much water comes out. I hate it. I like to control water volume, so I replaced it with extreme prejudice :-)
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*Several years ago I worked on a job with an old timer plumber who mostly bent his copper pipe instead of using elbows. He told me that there is one grade of pipe that is used for bending, but not all plumbing supply's carried it. He also had the proper benders for copper pipe. I don't remember what the pipe was called.
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Most likely "K copper".
K with you?
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Christopher A. Young
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Most likely "soft copper". "K" copper designates the thickness.
Stormin Mormon wrote:

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Is there a "proper" bender for copper pipe? I have a bender made for 3/4 conduit, can that be used to bend copper?
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*There are benders for copper available. They look similar to my conduit benders. I have never tried to bend copper pipe.
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I had a plumber tell me not bend rigid copper. Period. I guess there is flexible and rigid copper pipe...learn something new every day...
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On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 00:55:21 -0600, Zootal

As little as possible. Use ELs to change direction.
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