Cooper pipe bending limits

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So I'm installing 1/2 and 3/4 copper water pipe, city water, ~60psi. Question - how much can you safely bend the pipe without risk of future failure?
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247 degrees.
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On 2/10/2010 12:24 AM Stepfann King spake thus:

Nah, you're all mixed up; that's the maximum *temperature* of water you can run through the pipes.
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Better keep it pressurized. Under "normal" conditions water at 247F (or C, or even R) would be steam.
Ever had a good steam burn?
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Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

Kids today, pfft. When I was a boy, we didn't have hot water, so we had to bathe with the end of a steam nozzle me old man diverted from the boiler. Sure it'd turn you red and remove some skin, but you sure did get clean!
Jon
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On 2/10/2010 3:34 AM, David Nebenzahl wrote:

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David Nebenzahl wrote the following:

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

It's REALLY how many billions the government spent forming committees to study the problem.
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Oh man, does that mean I need to unwind my coils? Mike :-)
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On 2/10/2010 4:12 AM amdx spake thus:

Nope. Just watch out for them revenooers ...
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What radius?
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Let me say that I do not know. I cannot give you a definite answer, but the variables are: diameter of the tubing; copper alloy you want to bend; if you fill the copper with sand or not; if you pressurize it or not; temperature of the copper; type of bender; whether it is a plain one die bender or one with a mandrel (two piece); how fast you make the bend; and a couple of other things.
I'd Google and get some copper suppliers and people who really do this a lot, and use their answers.
For most home repair apps, a simple bender is better than no bender. But the technique will affect the results greatly.
Lastly, how critical of an application is this? IIRC, you did say it was for 60 # water line. Make your radii as big as you can, even if it means adjusting elsewhere for the bend. If you just really have to have a tight 90, buy a compression fitting or sweat a 90 on there.
Get some scrap and play with it. Realize the scrap may not have the same properties as new, but it will give you an idea about the failure points. I'd do it in a warm room, and not a cold garage, or outside in the snow. Use a heat lamp or similar to warm the copper before bending.
HTH
Steve
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Zootal wrote:

Is it hard or soft copper pipe?
TDD
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More important is the type of bender you use. Depending on the radius, it can go 180 degrees. A slight kink though, can cause damage to the wall and failure.
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On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 05:53:56 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"

One correct answer out of 10. Excellent for this NG.
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On 2/10/2010 9:04 AM, Caesar Romano wrote:

How do you know it was correct? The OP omitted any details such as if soft or hard copper tube was being used.
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You're catching on, Caesar! Most just don't know dookie, so have to post something they think is funny in their impaired state of mind. There are lots here who think because they "fix" things at home that they do it right, but when you get to really talking to them about it, you realize that they are just a bunch of baling wire and bubble gum repairmen who don't even know how to properly bend a copper tube.
It may also be added that tubing bending can be improved by the use of filler sand and pressurization to keep the outer walls pushing out. Of course, this is only offered in the advance copper tubing bending course. I would suggest to the OP and whoever else wants to bend copper to invest in a good bender, or pick one up used whenever they see one. Or even make a simple one. It makes for a much better job, and reduces failure rates.
Definitely not for the baling wire and bubble gum brigade.
Steve
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On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 09:02:02 -0800, "Steve B"

Well put.
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Steve B wrote:

Not everyone can be as totally awesome as you think you are, Steve.
Jon
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Ahhhh. Were I only as great as my dogs think I am .............
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