Converting Compressor motor from 220 v to 110 v

I have a 5 HP, 1989 Craftsman Air Compressor (Model NO. 919.176851). It's a 240 Voltage Single Phase motor made by General Electric. My question is: can I convert this to a 110v use by changing the plug-cord assembly only? Will this motor run on 110v without damage to it? Or am I stuck with having to stay with the 220v configuration.
Thanks,
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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If the motor gives dual voltage on the name plate, then you can. If not, then you can't.

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Unless the motor is dual voltage your stuck with 240 v. There are motors that can have the interior wiring configuration changed or the taps where the wires land are set up for dual voltage. Read the name plate and then google the motor.
I am amazed that you thought that changing the plug would even work. Sorta like changing the tires on a pinto and getting a T-bird.
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Maybe you could get a T-pinto?

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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The nameplate on the motor is the place to look. Some motors are dual voltage and the nameplate will have a wiring diagram or other information about how to change the voltage. Simply plugging a motor set for 240 volts into a 120 volt outlet will not work. It won't be able to put out the power needed to operate the compressor -- if it starts at all.
TKM
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Real 5hp motors couldn't be run on 120v. Well, they could, but would draw 50a... If this is a craftsman 5hp 6a motor, you probably can convert it. The directions will be either on the motor itself, or under a cover where the plug is attached. Normally convertable motors will give the amperage at both voltages on the nameplate.

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I've checked the motor plate:
It's a one speed motor v230, 60 Hz and 13.1 A (Amps?) . There is no mention of "dual voltage".
I did find a diagram under the switch housing, but nothing to indicate capability to wire another configuration. It (reminded me of the wiring for a GFCI) had - lines IN (plug cord) and lines OUT (motor cord).
The manual indicates a minimum branch circuit of 15 amps and " This compressor can be operated on a 15 amp circuit if: voltage supply to circuit is normal, circuit is not used to supply any other electrical needs (lights, appliances, etc. ) and extension cords comply with specifications".
It goes on that if these conditions cannot be met a 20 amp circuit may be necessary. "It is not necessary to change the cord set if this change is made".
Thanks,
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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You will have to leave it at 220 then. At 13A it is borderline as on startup it will pull much more. If you don't have a circuit now, I'd size it for 20A and be done with it.
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wrote:

Thanks.... I guess it stays @ 220V.
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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Halving the volts will double the amps. You will need a special circuit to handle the load as it will pull far more than normal house circuits can handle. . There is no benefit to change it over and many reasons to leave it at 220.
The motor may or may not be capable of running on 120V. You have to check the nameplate for specifications and the wiring that has to be changed internally.
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