Convert bathroom into pantry?

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mm wrote:

One.
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imho:
New owner? Are you planing on selling soon? I've seen tv shows with realtors preaching that bedrooms (numbers) and bathrooms (numbers and quality) sell houses. You might be reducing the value of your home. Also, some local taxes are based on bedrooms and bathrooms, so you migt then be overpaying for taxes for what you have.
Might want to consult with a designer/builder and keep that bathroom, and get options to increase your kitchen size.
Good luck, and keep us up to date with what you do.
tom @ www.Mesothelioma-Lawyers-List.com
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Sitting here, looking at text post across the internet, I'd lean toward "yeah, it very well may reduce the value of your home." There's no field in MLS for "pantry."
However, the reality is in the details. The old wisdom is "kitchens and bathrooms sell homes" and of course, here you're at odds with each other. If you can make that pantry really cool and really memorable such that it makes the female half of the couple looking at your home next light up and say "wow that's cool and unique, and I love it! A walk in closet for the kitchen! WOW! Now that I think about it hte other places in this neighborhood don't have enough kitchen storage!" then you may sell faster or for more money than otherwise.
But if you make that pantry look like a converted bathroom such that it sticks out with mixed feelings, and you're reducing your MLS bathroom count by .1 you may be undermining resale value.

A good idea if you can do it in the wall, perhaps behind an access panel(s). The toilet drain will be the one requiring some creativity. And the ceiling vent might be something you want to hide somehow so the buyers can't look up and say "Do I want my food in a place people used to crap?"
That's the nuttiness about value--perception becomes reality in a hurry, and there's no way of reliably predicting what folks will love or hate.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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Or incorporate a small utility sink into the pantry plan for cleanup or additional food prep space, or as a wet bar, since the plumbing is already there . . . .
-Frank
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That opens up new possibilities, depending on where the entertaining would be done. A nice liquor cabinet and sink may add some value.
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Make a pantry and a happy wife. Allow yourself the ability; later, to convert back to a half bath. Disclose this in any future sale, or negotiate an allowance for a buyer to convert the space. They might even like the pantry.
-- Oren
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. Thomas A. Edison
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I cannot recall a real estate add that listed a pantry as a feature, even for homes that I know have pantries. Its not uncommon around here to convert a pantry into a half-bath, as many of these older homes are multi-story with no bath on the main floor. I think life styles have changed and people no longer buy the large quantities of food that they used to, so we no longer need pantries. Even modern kitchens lack what I feel is sufficient storage space, and I think that is because people want preparation or eating space, and it is so common in many places to go out to dinner, or at least order in. My son and his wife live in California and in all the visits we have made there, she has cooked a meal only once; we almost always go out.
So I would give a lot of thought as to just what you would need a pantry for, before spending the money on tearing out a half-bath, and almost certainly reducing your equity in your home.
On the other hand, if you call it a wine cellar, that sounds like an excellent idea.
TC wrote:

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It depends very much on the age of the homes. Here (Rochester NY), there are tons of very nice homes built between 1900 and 1950, many of which contain very nice pantries. They are frequently mentioned in real estate ads, along with pictures. Sometimes a pantry is nothing but a walk-in closet. Others are more like a room, and can be very useful when planned correctly.

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Not@home wrote:

I spoke with a real estate agent that I know. He said for me (in central FL), this would not hurt the value of my home and also said "in many cases, it's a very good selling point". Our kitchen is small with virtually no storage space. We do not buy alot of food, but with pots/pans, crockpots, pancake griddle and so on, we have very little room.
I have to admit, pantries seem to be limited in central FL, but at every house that did have one, it was listed as a selling feature.
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Well, overall this would de-value the house. The number of baths, number of bedrooms, and square footage are basic in determining value. If you plan on staying there it really doesn't matter. Strange, when you add a bathroom it may increase your property tax, but when you take away a bathroom your property tax will stay the same. To find out approximately how much your house will devalue, contact a real-estate representative.
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