Contractor's grass seed


Just moved into new construction. Everything in the house seems to be of average or higher quality, but the grass seed that they spread on the lawn is coming in extremely clumpy. I will say that it was spread in June and this has been about the hottest summer on record, but I've also tried to water every night or morning at least for 10-15 minutes per area.
Anyway, my question is whether the contractor grade grass seed will eventually yield a nice plush lawn? Should I overseed with higher quality seed or just not worry about it until this fall or next spring when I can see what I'm really dealing with?
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Summer when its hot is extremely difficult to grow a lawn, I had a tree fall a month ago and reseeded a large area using new dirt and peatmoss to hold the water, I watered with a built in sprinkler system twice a day in the 90 heat and most died except where some gets shade, and the sun part only got late afternoon sun and I used Scotts best. The roots are so shallow with new grass and when its sunny and hot out it dies easily when dried in hours. So the fact you got some lawn is good. I would redo it when daytime temps are alot cooler.
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On 7/30/2010 10:55 AM, Matt wrote:

I doubt it. Probably used a lot of rye to get quick growth. I would over seed with a good grass for your area. If done now, you will need to water frequently.
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Agree 100%. Depending on where the OP is, I would wait until the end of August. I need to fertilize (the phosphorous levels are through the floor) but will wait at least another three weeks to apply. This isn't a good time of year for grass.
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Let it go until after Labor Day. Meanwhile, as the time approaches, watch for sales of sod at garden supply places. Sod is really the fuss free way to get a good stand of tough grass. For the price, the trade off is much reduced labor and ground preparation with far better results. I came to my senses a few years ago when I had a good sized patch to redo in the lawn. Looking in the storage shed filled with tools, fertilizer, bags of outdated seed, and all the other detritus, I just shut the door and went to one of the box stores, bought my sod, tossed it in the pickup, took it home and unrolled it onto the fairly smooth area, watered it well and spent the rest of the afternoon watching the Cubs lose. Watered regularly after that (more or less) then just let nature take its course. Still the best part of the lawn today. Might work that way for you.
Joe
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Never heard the term "contractor grade" grass seed before, but I assume you mean it's whatever the landscaper put down - usually a blend of quick sprouting rye grass and a slower sprouting fescue or bluegrass if water isn't a problem. Hydroseeding usually gives a more even application.
One common mistake people make is to stop or slow down watering when the rye comes in and not letting the fescue germinate. Doesn't sound like you are there yet.
Seeded lawns usully do come in in clumps and it takes 2 or 3 years before all the bare spots fill in. I'd wait until fall to see what you have. That will be the best time to overseed.
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"Contractor grade" grass seed is a common term for perennial rye. It grows quickly and looks decent until the house is sold and then is a PITA for the homeowners for years to come.

Your rye in the mix above is supposed to be *annual* rye. In theory it won't grow the second year (unless allowed to go to seed). It's intended to be cover for the better grasses that takes longer to germinate. Using this seed takes a bit better class of "contractor". ;-)

Which is why I liked what my contractor "planted"; Zoysia turf. ;-)
Yes, fall is usually the best time to do anything with lawns.
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On Jul 31, 1:16pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Nonsense. I've totally re-seeded lawns many times in the Fall. By winter you have decent cover and by May a full lawn. Bare spots aren't gonna fill in by themselves ever if you have a clump type grass, eg tall fescue, that doesn't spread. The key to getting it growing evenly is to properly apply the seed.
Contractor mix isn't going to give you a great looking lawn. Whether it's good enough for you depends on what your requirements are. It's extremely difficult to establish a lawn from seed in summer. There is huge competition from weeds and the watering demands, as Ransley pointed out are difficult to meet, unless you have a sprinkler system and either cheap water or a well.
Don't know where you live, so can't give precise timing. But I would wait until late summer and then kill off everything that you have there with glyphosate. Then 10 days later, make sure it's all dead, rake off the debris. Rent an over seeder (slice seeder) and apply a high quality grass mixture of the type you want and starter fertilizer. Keep it constantly damp until all the grass has started growing. That could mean several short waterings a day if it's still warm and sunny, Then slowly back off the watering so you water it less fequently, but longer.
As you're now in Fall, everything is on your side. Cooler temps, less competition from weeds, etc.
In the meantime, I'd take some soil samples and see what it's like. If it's not decent topsoil, you may want to till the whole thing up after killing it off and mix in soil ammendments. Also get the PH tested and if necessary apply lime now. And if you want a green lawn in summer, consider having an irrigation system installed. This is all some work up front, but you can either do a modest amount of work and have a great lawn, or do a half-assed job and then have problems for the next 20 years and never have the lawn look the way you want. That applies especially to having decent topsoil. If you try to grow a showcase lawn on gravel, you're never gonna be happy.

Good God! Where is it? How long before it invades my lawn here in NJ?


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On Sat, 31 Jul 2010 17:15:18 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You're safe until Spring, anyway. It has about 850mi to spread before it gets to you. The neighbors will be very happy, though. It's a whole lot better than Bermuda (which he used for the smaller houses).
Actually, the Zoysia is quite nice (a whole lot better than centipede or Bermuda). I liked creeping red fescue in the North but it wouldn't last a week here.
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On 7/30/2010 9:55 AM, Matt wrote:

depends on what he threw down. If it's K31, it does come up clumpy and will fill in. If it's anything else, it may have been put down too thin. Overseeding is always recommended ESPECIALLY on a new one. There's nothing wrong with using a contractor mix, but keep in mind that about 1/4 of it is annual rye which will spring up quick and hold the soil, but it won't be back next year.
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Steve Barker
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K31 is tall fescue, which, by definition, is a clump type grass. The individual plants can grow larger, to a point, but it will not fill in bare spots that a grass that will spread like bluegrass will.
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replying to Matt, John wrote: Contractors use the cheapest seed they can get away with. Overseed heavily with a mix of fescues. Water twice a day for 30 minutes each. Once early in the morning and again late afternoon. Do not water just before dark or you will end up with problems
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On Thursday, July 14, 2016 at 6:44:05 PM UTC-4, John wrote:

It's been 6 years sine the lawn was planted. His lawn has since been paved and turned into a parking lot. He rents out spaces for the local college football games. Burn barrels provided for free.
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