Contractor Broke Pipe -> Water Hammer

Our concrete contractor broke a PVC pipe while doing our front patio. After shutting off the water, they removed the broked pipe and capped as necessary. Since turning the main water back on, we experience water hammer everytime we flush the toilet in one bathroom. This has NEVER happened since we bought the house three years ago.
The concrete contractor suggested we open all faucets in the house for a short time to relieve pressure in the pipes, but this has not solved the problem..
My question: what recourse do I have with the concrete contractor to resolve this. If it is necessary to pay a plumber, can I get the concrete contractor to pay for this? Thanks for any help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
there's really nothing the broken pipe fix could have caused.
You may not have gotten the proper procedure for eliminating the water hammer. The water supply needs to be shut off, then open something below the level of all the other faucets, etc to drain the system. When draining, this is when all the faucets, laundry connects, etc need to be opened. The hammer arrestors are vertical pieces of tubing that may not drain out unless the nearby connection is opened to break the vacuum.
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Any contractor should have liability insurance, which you *did* check before hiring him, right? He should pay for the damages.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

What was the purpose of the pipe they capped?
Did it bring water to/from something?
Have you lost the use of water somewhere in/around your house?
Try posting the "who pays" question on misc.legal.moderated
I'd 'spect the answer to "can I" is "Maybe", and to "will I" would be, "Two chances - Slim and none." (And Slim rode out of town yesterday at noon.)
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the replies. Yes, the concrete contractor is licensed/insured. We capped because we decided we didn't need that pipe anymore.
Just so I have this straight, I should shut off the main water, open all faucets all the way, and then turn the main back on at a low level? Should I flush toilets, turn on washing machine, etc. How long should I leave everything running? Then I turn off everything and turn the main back up to a normal level? Thanks again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

I'd say that's about it 'cept I would flush the toilets but not bother with the washing machine or dishwasher.
If you DO have upright capped sections of pipe installed as water hammer arrestors and they were located senseably, that should do it.
If it doesn't, I'm out of ideas, but frankly, I too can't think of why the contractor shutting off the water and capping a pipe would have caused water hammer arrestors to lose their air cushions.
You chose not to tell us what the pipe they capped used to do, only that you didn't need it anymore, and while I can't think of a scenario offhand, it'd still be interesting to learmn what it was you "didn't need anymore" just in case there's a clue to the sudden onset of watter hammer hiding there.
Cheers,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The pipe was connected to an after-mkt faucet for a drip-system installed by the home's prior owner. We ended up pouring concrete in that area, so that pipe was just removed and the connection was capped.
Thanks again. I'll try your suggestion right now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It sounds like what ever the pipe you capped went to was acting as your water hammer arrestor. Possible? Perhaps.
--
Steve Barker



< snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Could be caused by air trapped in the pipes. Checkout:
http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/waterhammer.htm
For all you wanted to know about waterhammer and more!
In any case, if the concrete contractor is customer friendly, they should hire a plumber and get it fixed.
--
________________________________________________________________________
Richard Thoms
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So you have an unused modification to your plumbing that was acting as air chamber and arresting water hammers solely by accident and that was capped off in the completion of another job. Add a proper air chamber or expansion tank an be done with the water hammers and quit screwing around.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.