Continual cleaning v/s Self Cleaning oven Which is better?

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I use to have a Self Cleaning oven and I have to say I was very happy with it. I would put it on the Auto Clean cycle and except for having to replace the Lock once, it worked great. I don't recall it ever failing to clean up a mess. I wouldn't do anything except use the auto setting once or twice a year, then MAYBE sweep out the dust.
Then I moved to a home with a Continuous Cleaning Oven. I didn't realize that me "I" was to be continuously clean the thing. It looked bad when I got it and though I cleaned it (per directions), it was soon back to a mess. It looks quite bad.
My question is, "Is this the common experience, or is mine the exception?" I would like to hear from those of you that have had experience with both.
Thank You.
RC
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Years ago we had a continuous clean oven. What a crappy idea. It was never really clean. Go back to a self clean if you can.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Was that the hting which supposes to absorb dirt or something. I don't think they make it any more. Another idea did not pan out I guess.
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replying to Edwin Pawlowski, Sue wrote:

We bought a cottage with an old continuous clean oven, and I LOVE it! Not because it's so great with cleaning, but for this reason:
If you leave it on "preheat" instead of "bake", say at 350', both upper and lower heating units click on to maintain temp. I LOVE this feature! I use it for certain recipes, potatoes, veggies, anything I'm roasting that I want to brown a bit also. Works great! You can get brown and crispy on top and bottom.
Of course, gotta remember to switch over to just "bake" if it's a cake in the oven. I need to replace my range at home, and can't find anything that calls itself continuous clean anymore. Most newer ranges of course will preheat, but once desired temp is reached, only lower unit engages. I'd really like to find a range where I could maintain a steady temp and have the heat coming from upper and lower unit heating coils.
Any advice? I don't want to pay a fortune for expensive convection oven.
Thanks, Sue
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Sue wrote:

They don't even make continuous cleaning oven.
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wrote:

I am sure I just saw a Kenmore continuous clean oven advertised recently - and GE too???
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On Tuesday, August 11, 2015 at 8:31:13 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

self cleaning is the only way to go..... they are better insulated so more energy efficent. and although its not recommended i put my gas grill parts in my self cleaning oven on a short cycle, they look brand new when they come out.
once they go thru the self cleaning cycle i let them get cold, and put them in the dishwasher....
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On 08/10/2015 11:06 PM, Tony Hwang wrote: ...

Au contraire, ... <http://www.homedepot.com/b/Appliances-Cooking-Ranges-Electric-Ranges-Double-Oven-Electric-Ranges/Continuous-Clean/N-5yc1vZc3q5Z1z0ypvt>
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In alt.home.repair, on Tue, 11 Aug 2015 08:01:18 -0500, dpb

That turns out to be listed as self-cleaniing, not contiuous. And convection.
Google will do that, find a different word from what's asked.
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On Mon 10 Aug 2015 09:06:54p, Tony Hwang told us...

Perhaps not now, but at one time they did. IIRC, it was during the 70s, perhaps 80s.
They were found in various formats including larger toaster ovens, countertop convection ovens, and conventional ranges. The oven cavities were coated in some type of dull-finished, semi-rough porcelain. Apparently, typical spatters from roasting, etc., would be vaporized over time by this coating. Serious spills, OTOH, would need to be cleaned up using detergent and water.
I once lived in a brand new apartment that had a brand new gas range that had this feature. It was *not* a self-cleaning oven, and the instructions cautioned against using conventioinal oven cleaners. I noticed that I never had to clean the walls of the oven, except for the glass window in the door, although I did have to clean up a few bottom spills.
Unfortunately I cannot find an exmple nor remember the brand of stove I had, but they did exist at one time.
I also owned a Farberware contertop convection oven that had this feature. This was also during the 70s.
My current electric range has a self-cleaning convection oven that also has the "easy clean" feature. The oven has a solid bottom with no exposed heating elements. To use the easy clean feature, one puts a measured aount of water in the bottom of the oven and runs a heating cycle. When cool enough to work with, the interior is wiped down. This really amounts to nothing more than steam cleaning.
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In alt.home.repair, on Tue, 11 Aug 2015 01:44:02 +0000, Sue

I don't think they make them, and I looked at least 4 years ago. I liked mine, because you didn't have to do anything. There was nothing you could do. Using oven cleaner or any kind of cleaning just ruins the continuous cleaning surface
Of course it's never perfectly clean but it's never very dirty either. I suppose one coudl gte it cleaner by running it for a while with nothing in it. Or smething that never makes a mess, Bread?
I woudl still have mine if I hadn't set fire to it.
You could look on craig's list or better yet, list yourself on craig's list as wanting to buy one.
That's how I replaced the one I set fire to**. I needed Harvest Gold and within a couple days, someone called and sold me his. Looked like new, Perfect. I don't know how they managed that. He said his mother was compulsive. Nothing else would account for it. I would have thought it *was* new but I found a tiny bit of dirt in a couple corners. $100 iirc. This one has self-cleaning, which I do about once a year. The model number gave a model that was entirely diffrernt, but eventually, trial and error and looking for similar numbers, I found a manual that fit this one.
**Actually the guy who sold me the oven found my ad because he was looking for "fire" wood, and I mentioned the fire. By chance he wanted to get rid of this oven, which was his second, that he got when his mother moved out of her home. Though he said he was going to buy a replacement, I don't know why.

Maybe you can you rewire whatever oven you have. It only requirs that the switch be able to carry the current for both of htem. The thermostat will work the same. And that the connection not be permanent, that is, you don't want that any time you broil you also bake, and that any time you bake you also broil. The solution to that is a toggle switch, marked Both and Separate. You'd need a heavy dury switch.. If it's double pole or more, connect them all in parallel.
If you wanted to be fancy, you could make it a push button and a relay, so that every time you turned the oven off, evenif they were connected to gether before the relay dropped out and you'd have to push the button to make it be both again. This would also mean the heavy current would have a shorter path but I don't thin that is significant. Others may disagree. You'd need a heavy load relay that also won't be damaged by the heat of the oven. They have them online. If it's double pole or more, connect them all in parallel.
I rewired a room AC so it woud turn completely off, instead of just the compressor, the fan too, just by moving three clips around, to rearrange where the switch went. Here you ight need some oven wire, whatever that is. And you wouldn't want to so c

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replying to Edwin Pawlowski, Sue wrote:

We bought a cottage with an old continuous clean oven, and I LOVE it! Not because it's so great with cleaning, but for this reason:
If you leave it on "preheat" instead of "bake", say at 350', both upper and lower heating units click on to maintain temp. I LOVE this feature! I use it for certain recipes, potatoes, veggies, anything I'm roasting that I want to brown a bit also. Works great! You can get brown and crispy on top and bottom.
Of course, gotta remember to switch over to just "bake" if it's a cake in the oven. I need to replace my range at home, and can't find anything that calls itself continuous clean anymore. Most newer ranges of course will preheat, but once desired temp is reached, only lower unit engages. I'd really like to find a range where I could maintain a steady temp and have the heat coming from upper and lower unit heating coils.
Any advice? I don't want to pay a fortune for expensive convection oven.
Thanks, Sue
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On Tue, 11 Aug 2015 01:44:02 +0000, Sue

Continuous clean has a "catalytic" coating that burns off deposits under normal temperatures. Self clean heats to extreme temperatures to clean. Self cleaning ovens are NOT designed to be used in a tight fitting space - they require an inch or two of clearance on both sides. We pull ours out to run the clean cycle (the few times we use the clean feature)
Go for the convection oven - the feature is NOT that terribly expensive, and it is VERY usefull and actually uses less power to do the same cooking job.
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On 08/10/2015 9:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

Not _necessarily_ true; the one here is in the cabinet row just as any other; it has sufficient insulation that is in the owners manual to be allowed. It's a 30+ yr old GE with also the microwave in the oven; no longer available and will be sorely missed if it ever does give up the proverbial ghost...
It's gone thru the cleaning cycle in situ any number of times during that time with no issues.
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On Tuesday, August 11, 2015 at 8:59:01 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

Same here. I had an older 30" oven/microwave in a cabinet. I replaced it with KitchenAid 36" dual ovens and had to rework the cabinet to make it fit, with essentially zero clearance on the sides. I was a bit worried about the cleaning heat, as one side I had to glue on a new piece of oak veneer. But it's worked fine. When cleaning, the side gets a bit warm, but nothing worrisome. What counts is the installation specs for the actual oven.
As to continuous vers self-clean, no opinion there. These ovens are self-cleaning and work great.
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On Tuesday, August 11, 2015 at 8:59:01 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

Same here. I had an older 30" oven/microwave in a cabinet. I replaced it with KitchenAid 36" dual ovens and had to rework the cabinet to make it fit, with essentially zero clearance on the sides. ...
This is an old farm house w/ small kitchen and no spare counter or cabinet space--if the ability to house the microwave inside the oven were to disappear, there's no practical place to put an additional appliance... :(
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On Tuesday, August 11, 2015 at 9:46:01 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

There are cases where a built-in microwave can make sense, so I see your point. The problem with built-in microwaves is that they are expensive, expensive to repair, they aren't any bigger/better than a counter top one. In fact, the ones I looked at were smaller, crappier than a $150 counter top one, while costing $1000. If the counter top one blows up, you just chuck it and get a new one. I have the counter space and having two conventional ovens has advantages so it made sense for me.
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On 08/11/2015 12:31 PM, trader_4 wrote: ...

That's the point; this isn't what you're thinking of a second small microwave unit; the unit is in the regular oven and so is as large as it is (which is a full-size oven in a standard 30" free-standing range).
Thus it takes _zero_ extra space and can be used simultaneously with the oven which makes things like baking potatoes and the like a dual-edged sword...otoh, it does make just "nuking" a cuppa' coffee tougher if the oven is in use for something else, but that's a compromise we've become well adjusted to.
There is, afaik, nobody still making them (and I don't know that anybody but GE ever did). Mom saw this one when she was substitute teaching in home ec at the high school and it was the new dealer-supplied one in the home ec kitchen.
I've stockpiled a replacement magnetron; other specific parts are getting difficult or impossible owing to its age.
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On Tuesday, August 11, 2015 at 1:41:40 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

I've never seen one of those, only the typical dual ovens where you get one microwave, one regular oven.
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On 08/11/2015 2:06 PM, trader_4 wrote:

...

Not many have... :) I don't know how long they were in production; this one was purchased in 1978 by the invoice date.
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