Contact cement problem


Yesterday I used DAP water-based contact cement to attach a laminate edge strip to one edge of a counter top that has a pine edge strip (smooth but with no existing finish) already. The strip of laminate already had a coating of that same contact cement that had dried long ago, so I put an additional coat on that surface and also gave the pine edge strip its first coat. After an hour or so, they bonded together just fine.
Later in the day I put a coating of the same contact cement on another pin edge and on another strip of laminate. They will *not* bond. I applied another coat of the contact cement to both surfaces, but they still would not bond.
What could possibly be the problem here? The contact cement is less than a year old and appears to be fine: it is still a milky liquid with a *faint* solvent smell. But even if it were approaching the end of its shelf life (one year), how come it worked on one strip and not on the other?
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

I never have liked the water-based contact cements but that shouldn't be the problem, just a comment...
If it isn't the cement, only one real thought comes to mind and that is that the pine is porous enough you still don't have a good covering coat.
I'd probably try one more coat then get a new can of solvent-based cement if that didn't cut the mustard...
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    I agree. I have not had the problem.
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In my albeit limited experience, contact cement just doesn't work well on laminate edge strips. I've had problems every time I've tried it. It's fine on the large surfaces of course.
I use two-part expoxy for the edge strips now, and it holds up every time.
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The main thing I have found is that you have to let the Contact Cement dry for at least 15 minutes (up to about 30 minutes max) before sticking the two parts together. Sticking them together before each piece dries often prevents it from working. Contact Cement is different than other glues in that respect. But, I think that's why it is called "Contact" Cement -- you put in on both surfaces, let it dry, and then it works on contact between the two pieces. Did you do that part -- i.e. letting both pieces dry first before sticking them together?

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As a matter of fact, contact cement instructions used to say to the effect for a removable bond to assemble before it totally dries.
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On Sat, 23 Jan 2010 15:05:22 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

I would not think contact cement is the best choice for wood. Yellow wood glue beats a contact cement for wood. Edge clamps eliminate nails or other fasteners.
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