Constructing a Garage Office/Studio

We have a two car garage in our new home, which is about 8 months old. We didn't get the garage insulated, which I'm kicking myself now for, but I'm throwing around the idea of insulating the walls, ceiling, and garage door to possibly use it as a garage office and/or studio. We're in Central Texas so our summers are extreme and winters can have a bite as well, so I have a few questions.
The insulation part I think is fairly start forward since I'll have to cut a hole in the walls between each stud and just blow insulation in, which I can use the same thing in the ceiling. As for the door I'm looking at the Corning insulation kits, but is there any suggestion on how to completely seal the door from drafts, bugs, and critters? When it's closed I'd like it to be tight.
For flooring I'm thinking either indoor/outdoor carpet or even possibly some type of coating or stain. We've never parked in the garage so it's fairly clean with no oil or anything. Any suggestions here?
Heating and cooling is another hurtle because I don't think our HVAC unit could handle adding that much square feet to it's workload. My thought is a portable Heat/Cooling unit where we'd just run the condensation line outside, but what other options do we have? The garage has no windows, so a window unit isn't possible.
Has anyone ever tackled something like this before? Unfortunately since we'll have to keep the door attached (per HOA rules) there's no way to get rid of that garage look, but I'd think it could make for a nice place to hangout and work.
Thanks for any thoughts or ideas... or even pictures or suggestions from people who've gone through such a project before.
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Depends on the final use. There are rubber type of flooring that can easily be washed if you are using it as a workshop. Carpeting has the benefit of noise reduction and comfort.

You can cut a hold in the wall and use a window unit mounted in a frame or you can just drill a hole and use a mini-split system. If you have gas, heat can be done with a variety of open or closed flame heaters. Propane is a possibility also. Electric is simple if it is not cost prohibitive where you are.

Depending on your budget, you can remove the door, frame it and paint it to look like a door. Trompe L'oil comes to mind.
In any case, I'd look at cutting a window into the room. I don't like living in a cave.
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Don't even think about blowing in insulation unless you know you have a vapor barrier under the drywall. If not, junk the drywall, put in bats or whatever you like and cover with 6 mil poly sealed every where. But frame your window(s) and AC opening first if you choose to go that way.

Consider simply using a 2 part epoxy floor paint. Not fancy, but durable. If you need a homey look use an area rug, or similar.

Do at least one nice big window or two small ones. North light is dandy if possible.

Overall, not that big a deal. Ed's faux door plan above is spot on for keeping you and the HOA happy. Don't put semi-permanent things outside in front of the 'door', though, as that might cause small minded complainers to get upset. Joe
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You could remove the opener and permanently seal off the door on the inside, then put in a false wall with insulation and a vapor barrier and then sheetrock it just like toe other walls, after you insulate them, On the outside it will still be the original door, and if you sell you can tell the buyer that the false wall can be removed and the space converted back to a garage. You will loose a few inches due to that new wall being slightly thicker due to the original door being thicker than siding would have been, but if you are hurting for a few inches, then your garage must be awfully tiny. Bggest problem I can think of is electric outlets on the new false wall if you want to put something against that wall. Any wiring needs to be code, in case of a fire or other disaster. You don't say if you will try to get a permit or not.
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You could remove the opener and permanently seal off the door on the inside, then put in a false wall with insulation and a vapor barrier and then sheetrock it just like toe other walls, after you insulate them, On the outside it will still be the original door, and if you sell you can tell the buyer that the false wall can be removed and the space converted back to a garage. You will loose a few inches due to that new wall being slightly thicker due to the original door being thicker than siding would have been, but if you are hurting for a few inches, then your garage must be awfully tiny. Bggest problem I can think of is electric outlets on the new false wall if you want to put something against that wall. Any wiring needs to be code, in case of a fire or other disaster. You don't say if you will try to get a permit or not.
A nice way to do this is to leave 6 feet or so between the wall and the door so it can still be opened. The space can be used as storage. Locally the city picks on people who convert their garage and won't let them park in their driveway any more saying it is not a driveway but part of their yard since they do not have a garage. Leaving the door there and working would help fool everyone into thinking there still is a garage.
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Just remember taht you rfloor is probably sloped to the garage door. Everything you put in there will be tilted to some degree and may need leveling. For example: A desk, things will roll off it fast! Drill press, bit will roll off it too, and etc.:-) Hank <~~~ a little of kilter too
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