Constitutionality of light bulb ban questioned - Environmental Protection Agency must be called for a broken bulb

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James Sweet wrote: ...

Again, there is _not_ a "ban"...
--
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Not only is it not a ban, but this also is not a matter of constitutional law.
The people who are saying it's a ban, and/or crying infringement of constitutional rights are either just plain idiots, have reading comprehension problems, have an agenda, or some combination of the above.
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I have been looking for dimmable florescents without luck. Where do you find them - can you tell me the brand?

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GE brand at Target.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Cold start CFL floods are available at 1000Bulbs.com
They also carry dimmable and decorative CFLs.
The upside to this government action is that you're going to see major improvements in incandescent technology in the coming years. GE and Sylvania aren't about to close up their light bulb business and say "oh well."
The immediate downside is that the CFL manufacturers are going to have to get their act together REAL fast. Their defective rate out-of-the-box is really bad. Plus, their actual versus projected life is, well, pure fiction. And even though the mercury is a fraction of what it costs to burn coal for the same lumen/life span, none of the numbers make sense if the bulbs don't actually last as long as the projections.
This is the price we pay when we change technologies--a shake out of the good from the bad.
As for ethanol in gas---it's an oxygenate to reduce pollution. It's in there to replace MTBE which is REALLY bad stuff. As soon as you come up with a less expensive alternative, lets us know. In the meantime, I'll choose less pollution over slightly increased cost (increased cost being a relative term--because if you count in the medical costs due to increased pollution, the ethanol is actually cheaper) any day of the week.
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On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 21:01:46 -0500, Rick-Meister

Hi Rick,
All Energy Star CFLs must conform to that programme's performance standards governing a wide range of operating factors including service life and rated light output (e.g., if the manufacturer claims their product provides the same amount of light as a 100-watt incandescent, it must produce at least 1,600 lumens).
See: http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/product_specs/program_reqs/cfls_prog_req.pdf
In terms of Hg, a Philips 25-watt SLS25 CFL contains 2.64 mg of mercury. This lamp has a rated service life of 15,000 hours and produces 1,750 lumens or slightly more than a standard soft-white 100-watt incandescent at approximately 1,550 lumens.
Over the course of its 15,000 hour life, this CFL will consume a total of 375 kWh of electricity, whereas the equivalent 100-watt incandescent will use 1,500 kWh; a difference, in this case, of 1,125 kWh ($135.00's worth at $0.12 per kWh).
Based on the U.S. national average, our incandescent lamp would result in the additional release of 13.7 mg of Hg, as well as an additional 1,533 lbs of CO2, 6.11 lbs of SO2 and 2.37 lbs of NOx, plus other nasties such as As, Cr, Cd, Ni and Pb in various quantities.
A breakdown by state can be found here: http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/documents/eGRID2006V2_1_Summary_Tables.pdf
Cheers, Paul
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Ive had maybe 1 or 2 failures with maybe 60 of HDs cfls, many are on photocell at near 2 years at down to -10f without a failure. I know they are made by maybe 20 plants in the far east so im sure alot of junk is made. HD does have a 9 year warranty.
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That's a blanket statement that doesn't hold water. Some are really good in this regard, others are really bad.

Again, That's a blanket statement that doesn't hold water. Some are really good in this regard, others are really bad.
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says...

Strawman. Not all electricity comes from not need come from coal.

Exactly the point.
-- Keith
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Roughly half of all electricity generated and about 60 per cent of what is generated by electrical utilities.
Source: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epa/epat1p1.html
Cheers, Paul
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snipped-for-privacy@ns.sympatico.ca says...

When was the last one built? When will the next be built? IOW, another asinine argument from a leftist weenie.
--
Keith

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Since you asked so nicely, according to the latest DOE report (February 18, 2008), as of September 20, 2007, there were 28 coal-fired power plants under construction (14,885 MW), 6 more nearing construction (1,859 MW) and 13 more that had received construction permits (6,422 MW). There were a further 67 plants (42,394 MW) that had been announced, but had not as of that time been issued permits.
Cheers, Paul
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Paul M. Eldridge wrote: ...

And to round out the picture, last I looked about a month ago, there were 28 iirc formal filings for licensing docketing by the NRC thru next fiscal year and some 20 others projected for the next couple of years beyond...
--
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Plenty of A19 lightbulbs 40-100 watts are USA-made. So are plenty of 4-foot fluorescents.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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wrote:

First of all, Congress did not "ban" incandescent lamps -- they simply set minimum efficiency standards, as they have with other consumer products such as air conditioners and refrigerators. Secondly, lighting manufacturers already sell high efficiency incandescent lamps that meet these new standards. You can buy these ones at Home Depot:
http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/consumer/hes/display.php?mode=1
Cheers, Paul
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On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 10:47:48 -0700, Jim Thompson

Hi Jim,
A 70-watt soft-white Philips Halogen Energy Saver has a 3,000 hour rated service life and produces 1,600 lumens (22.8 lumens per watt). A Philips Duramax soft-white A19 incandescent has a rated service life of 1,500 hours and provides 1,550 lumens (15.5 lumens per watt). Watt for watt, a 70-watt Halogen ES generates 1.5 times more light.
Sources: http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/halogen/pdf/p-5901.pdf http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/incan/pdf/p-8493.pdf
Anything else we can clear-up for you?
Cheers, Paul
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CFLs will reduce mercury entered into the environment, the coal burned to generate electricity releases 2-3 times the amount of mercury over the life of the bulb.
What isnt made in china, even 30-45% of dental caps etc are made in china. how about poes tv, etc etc
Its not a ban,
Since when was an incandesant Effecient, do you know only 4-7 watts of a 100w bulb are out put as actual Light you can see, the rest is heat, Thats effecient? Put in 11, 100w bulbs and you have a 1000w heater, and now pay more to run the AC to remove that heat, and release more mercury from Coal plants to run that AC, They should be Taxed to death and CFLs rebated, not banned.
Poe is a moron and so are you for not seeing the facts and posting this crap, incandesants should have limited use in todays world
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wrote:

Seen any CFL's that'll work outdoors in the winter? I need a few for my yard lights. Got any that'll work on 3V DC? Need some for my flashlights. Will CFL's work in cars? Lots of incandescents there. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Speak softly and carry a loaded .45 Lifetime member; Vast Right Wing Conspiracy Web Site: www.destarr.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
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On 6/20/2008 2:30 PM David Starr spake thus:

Well, he did say "incandescents should have limited use in today's world", which pretty much covers what you've described; the great majority of light bulbs are used for domestic, commercial or industrial lighting, where CFLs are appropriate. The few exceptions where incandescents can't be replaced or where it's impractical to do so are small potatoes by comparison.
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When you eventually buy a new car, new yard lights, or flashlights, they'll use LEDs. Manufacturers are already starting to switch over. You're stating a non-issue. Additionally, you'll still be able to get incandescents for those kind of utility needs. The efficiency law doesn't affect those types of bulbs. Go to the source and read for yourself.

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