Considering detached metal clad workshop questions/comments

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snipped-for-privacy@xmail.com0.invalid says...

So, you drive coast-to-coast because it's too "dangerous" to fly? Life is a risk, but it beats the alternative. Grow up and join the rest of the adults.
--
Keith

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krw wrote:

Hey, Keith! You really don't understand any of this, do you. OK, just for you we'll give the "Dick and Jane" version.
There are many facets of our lives and makeup where primal or basic fears are not necessarily overcome by logic and science, or even observation. That spinning helicopter rotor blade is 3 or 4 feet higher than your head . . . but most people still duck going underneath it. I "know" that the airplane I'm on most likely won't fall out of the sky. But that doesn't prevent the tiniest little bit of anxiety when it takes off. (I've logged almost 700,000 air miles in the last 12 years.) I also know that I am quite safe inside my shed during a thunder storm. Still . . .
Here endeth the lesson. Have a nice day.
FoggyTown
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I, too, have an opinion on this. DON'T DO IT.
Now, that's just an opinion. I have a 750 sf metal detached shop in the Northwest. Some general observations about it:
1) The constant dripping. It RUINS your tools, your projects, your life. If I had to do it over again, I'd tear this thing down and build a new one. I've spent hours cleaning and waxing iron tool tops (lathe ways, ts top, jointer, bandsaw, etc) and come out a couple of days later to rust spots on everything. If you have any humidity, you're going to be in sad shape. Water/condensation collects on everything inside the roof, and drips, drips, drips. I've had finishes ruined with water spots, constantly clean and wax everything, and still it's a problem. Granted, in the NW, it rains every day except Christmas, but it's still an annoyance, especially given the humidity of the south.
2) The noise when it rains. It's charming the first time - after that, it's a headache-generator. It can get DEAFENING. And it drips more when it rains.
3) Lack of finished walls inside. The previous owner had to sheetrock/insulate everything just to have walls to hang things on, and it's turned into a nightmare. Because of the condensation, I now have mold growing inside my walls. It's unsightly (growing THROUGH the sheetrock) and unsafe. I don't want my son or wife even near the shop. Not to mention that if you don't, you're messing with conduit, air lines, everything else having to be somehow fastened to the metal walls, and that's just a mess.
4) Did I mention the dripping?
If I had to do it over (and I may) I may save the foundation and just knock this thing down and build a real shop. Real wood walls, real electric work (I've got a 150amp line running 100 yards from the house underground - NOT cheap), real attic, real roof, real walls, real stable.
If I needed something to keep a roof over the head of some sheep or an old tractor, I may use a metal shed again. No, on second thought, I would NEVER own one again.
But, YMMV. Maybe it's different in the south? Up here, it's a friggin nightmare, and I really dislike my shop. Who'd have thought?!?!?!
foggytown wrote:

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Make sure you are comparing apples to apples.
I read through several posts and many talk about a tin shed and the inherent problems with same. Were you going to build a plywood shed with no insulation and no attention to detail? You couldn't hang anything inside a simple exterior skinned wood building either.
I assumed you were talking about a metal building. There are many stores, offices, and school buildings that do just fine as metal buildings.
As you talk to a builder, make sure you are talking about an insulated steel building. If you use a drop ceiling (works well for heat and cool load, dust control, troffer fluorescent lights, etc) make sure it is insulated and at least 10' clear above the floor. Walls can be framed for drywall or wafer board and provide space for wiring and substantial insulation. I would look very seriously at hydronic heat in the floor. There are many farm shops that use hot water heaters and a circulating pump to warm the shop. If your feet are warm, you're comfortable.
______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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I too am considering a metal workshop. I have read about the dripping, and I can understand the heat /cooling issues. I am wondering about the basic frame being done in metal with iron girders spaning the ceiling(I would like a second floor or loft for storage). I am not sure what the cost is, but to have 2*14 joists spanning 28 feet for the ceiling will be expensive. Would iron be cheaper? Once the frame is done in metal, I will put up plywood in the corners, insulation board and vynal siding on the exterior. I will also put up insulation and plywood for the interior walls instead of drywall. I am hoping this will eliminate some of the metal shed issues, but am not sure what the cost will be.
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Top posted for your convenience.
Really appreciate the commentary! Senior moment was cause of my 13A circuit breaker goof, reality check discloses a preponderance of 15A and a few 20A breakers. House had major re-do about 15 years ago and a second panel was added although it has mostly 15A also. Have struck out getting electricians to return calls although one did and set an appointment that wasn't kept. "Been on vacation and didn't know that he didn't keep it" with follow on call with "Guess you'd better find someone else as we're swamped". Builders are running the same course.
Considering the multitude of Store It Yourself building being metal it doesn't seem like condensation with drips falling on content could help them survive. Understood that they probably lack heat & air but still. Either way air & heat are part of the equation! Our DIL asked a local builder for rough estimate for 20X40 building, not specifying what material but I presumed wood, and got "About $35K to $40K" that included air & heat. Call to his office about 25 miles away got "We don't have much going on in your area but I'll let him know and if interested he'll call" but no call to date.
Still pondering and really hoped for users of the metal clad observations. Got one user saying he's ready to tear his down and replace with wood frame. Window air unit is dropping humidity and keeping garage somewhat livable but we moved into the house in Jan 2006 so don't have winter experience. More chatter welcomed!
On Sat, 19 Aug 2006 08:42:15 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

Well here's a good point. You've priced the wooden option, now price the metal. You should see a significant difference.
FoggyTown
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AYUP, except the original included sheet rock walls and the ~$15K for the metal clad didn't. Nor did it include plumbing, etc. As Omar observed, roughly, "The moving finger having writ moves on and all of your piety and wit removes not a word of it and all your tears will not wash out a bit of it". I'd rather get it done and behind as time rushes on! A local contractor visited yesterday and he acts as a GC and will work up estimate for consideration. He lives in the same community so gas prices aren't important compared to the one 25 miles away.

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On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 09:42:03 -0400, nospambob wrote:

I have a buddy who put up a 30x40 foot metal truss / metal skin building a few years ago. He had the foundation work done by a pro and did everything else himself. Dual 240/120 outlets every 6 feet. Eight foot fluorescent lighting, insulation, heating, and cooling. Doing all the work himself (including excavation for the foundation) his cost was about $20,000. He uses it for a combination woodworking/metalworking shop. He is happy with it. Condensation isn't much of an issue seeing how it's in Albuquerque, NM.
D. G. Adams
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