Connection to cable constantly lost

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Thanks! Very interesting information, and I appreciate it.
MaryL
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On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 08:33:46 -0600, "MaryL"

Try and re-install the software drivers for the hardware devices. The drivers can become corrupted. Reset the router, via the small button, if necessary.
If the ISP changed, what are the DNS server IP numbers. Are they set in the router?
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wrote:

All of that has been done. My ISP number changes every time I log on (or maybe every time I access the Internet) -- a dynamic ISP number, not static.
MaryL
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On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 17:29:30 -0600, "MaryL"
I would also post your question to 24hoursupportdesk.help Lots of computer geeks over there.
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"MCSE" wrote in message wrote:

Yes, I have used them in the past. That should probably be my next step.
Thanks, MaryL
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On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 17:29:30 -0600, "MaryL"

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wrote:

A couple of things come to mind. One is a general comment on testing routers, the other is more specific to your problem.
General comment:
You said: "I frequently...lose connection to cable and to the Internet."
Which obviously means that sometimes you have a good connection.
You said: "He suspects that the router is at fault. However, he tested the router and it responded correctly. Moreover, the cable company was able to "ping" it from the home office. "
Which means the router was working when the tech tested it and when the cable company pinged it.
Has the tech tested the router (from your side) when the cable/ internet *wasn't* working? Has the cable company pinged it (from their side) when the cable/ internet *wasn't* working?
Not finding something wrong when the system is working doesn't mean the router is OK. If it has an intermittent problem, the problem may only show up - ready? - intermittently. :-)
Now, specific to your problem:
I'm assuming you have 2 routers: The LinkSys Wireless-G that you own, and the cable company's router, right? OK, you said "I frequently...lose connection to *cable* and to the Internet."
If you are losing your cable connection at the same time, it can't be your LinkSys router can it? Your cable TV doesn't go through the LinkSys does it? If that's correct, then tell the cable to change their router whether it passes their tests or not.
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clipped

the cable company. I have dial-up internet and satellite TV. Of course, the satellite signal disappears whenever a storm blows through. When at my daughter's home, I use their cable TV and internet, which has fairly frequent drops of internet connection and unavailability (this was on comcast). The cable company probably sends/receives everything by satellite, right? A friend of mine, when her cable TV service was iffy, called the cable TV folks and they could communicate with her cable box. Have you called cable folks when the stuff is not working?
One other thought, and this is recollection of something I read long, long ago.......when I owned my first UPS, it said that it should not be plugged into a plug-in strip with surge protection. Any such warning with yours that might apply to the whole-house surge protection?
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One thing the cable tech should have done is measure the signal level at your cable modem and TV. This can also be done using some cable boxes. F connectors are notorious for being bad. He should have gone through the installation, cut all the ends off the cables and replaced the connectors. Sometimes this doesnt help because its the female part of the connector thats bad. Usually it only takesa small improvement in signal quality to cure the problem. My problem went away with only a 1 db improvement and he continued working on it and managed to get a 3 db improvement. No problems for over a year now.
Jimmie
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MaryL wrote:

Both you and your tech did not do most simple basic things. Did he measured aseband signal level? Every connector incurs ~2db loss when connection is proper. Is your router properly configured and does it have a lastest firmware loaded? Utilized ping and ipconfig command to see what is going on? Eliminated all the gadget accessroies and tried basic TV or/and Internet hook up? Use common sense, think logic. Replacing this and that is a good method of trouble-shooting. When you replace something you must have a valid reason. Good luck,
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Unfortunately, I don't have any idea how to do most of what you described. I can tell you that the tech measured signal level (but I don't know what "aseband" is). He measured at each connection point and also went outdoors to check the entry into the house. My computer is only a few months old, and I hired tech support to set everything up, including wireless for the laptop (but the desktop is not wireless). That person went through a number of ipconfig commands. The cable company was able to ping the router. Gadget accessories? Unless I miss your meaning, I don't have any. I have the CPU, monitor, printer, and a small TV. And, of course, there is the router and cable modem. The tech support I hired downloaded all drivers. I'm not even sure what you mean by "basic" TV and/or Internet hook up. I went through a routine -- numerous times -- where SuddenLink had me unhook just about every cable and connect and re-connect components. Finally, they sent someone out as I described in my original message. We did lose Internet access on one occasion while he was here, so he saw it but still did not solve the problem. He did call the home office, and they could ping the router and modem. The technician they sent "suspects" that it is the router even though they could ping it.
MaryL
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wrote:

re: Gadget accessories? Unless I miss your meaning, I don't have any
I believe that Mr. Hwang is referring to the surge supressors, UPS, etc. Calling them "gadgets" might be excessive, but a fairly standard troubleshooting technique is to get the "system" (all components from input to output) down to it's simplest configuration and get it working. If the problem goes away, you can start adding "gadgets" back in to see which one is causing the problem.
In your case, you might want to start with just one computer and the cable modem, then add in the LinkSys router, then add other devices to the router, then add in the surge supressors and UPS's, one at a time.
BTW - and don't take this wrong way, I'm only trying to help...
In various posts, you have used both UBS and USB. I believe you mean UPS as follows:
UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supply, essentially your battery backup system. UBS - An investment firm headquartered in Switzerland USB - Universal Serial Bus, the modern day standard for connecting peripherals to a computer.
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re: Gadget accessories? Unless I miss your meaning, I don't have any
I believe that Mr. Hwang is referring to the surge supressors, UPS, etc. Calling them "gadgets" might be excessive, but a fairly standard troubleshooting technique is to get the "system" (all components from input to output) down to it's simplest configuration and get it working. If the problem goes away, you can start adding "gadgets" back in to see which one is causing the problem.
In your case, you might want to start with just one computer and the cable modem, then add in the LinkSys router, then add other devices to the router, then add in the surge supressors and UPS's, one at a time.
BTW - and don't take this wrong way, I'm only trying to help...
In various posts, you have used both UBS and USB. I believe you mean UPS as follows:
UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supply, essentially your battery backup system. UBS - An investment firm headquartered in Switzerland USB - Universal Serial Bus, the modern day standard for connecting peripherals to a computer.
You're right, I did mean UPS. "Starting with one computer" is easy. I have a laptop with networking capabilities, but it is seldom used. So, this all relates to my desktop computer. It also started with my previous computer (replaced just a few months ago) and continues with the current computer. All peripherals or "gadgets" are new and have been replaced since the problem started *except* the router. We did bypass the router as a "test." That did not have an effect. Following instructions by phone, I also disconnected the surge protector and used the wall plug. Again, no effect. And you can't imagine how difficult it is for me to do that because I have to crawl on the floor under a very heavy desk to get to the outlet, and it is difficult to see the back of the CPU. That's not a problem that anyone on a newsgroup can alleviate, of course, but it does mean that I get very tired of doing the same thing over and over again as each person I contact instructs me to go through the same routine -- and the results by then are predictable. That is, we still have not eliminated the problem.
Thanks, MaryL
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wrote:

In an earlier post someone suggested "Replace your dodgy router and be done with the problems."
To which you replied: "I think that's what I am going to have to try."
Then in this post you said: "We did bypass the router as a test. That did not have an effect."
To which I reply: Why would you consider replacing the router if you've proven that it's not the problem?
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In an earlier post someone suggested "Replace your dodgy router and be done with the problems."
To which you replied: "I think that's what I am going to have to try."
Then in this post you said: "We did bypass the router as a test. That did not have an effect."
To which I reply: Why would you consider replacing the router if you've proven that it's not the problem?
Because it's the only thing I can think of to do and it is the only component that has not been replaced since all of this started (and the reason I posted my original message). Despite the fact that bypassing the router -- and even the SuddenLink cable guy did that when it finally malfunctioned while he was present -- he still says that he suspects the router. I don't know quite how to describe it, but he talked about being able to ping a router and have it work on some occasions but not on others. Actually, bypassing the router -- and also disconnecting *everything* from the wall -- sometimes works and sometimes has no effect at all. Sometimes, it is a matter of minutes before I regain connectivity and sometimes it is hours. I just can't find a pattern. SuddenLink claims that their tests show that the cable connections are working. Incidentally, the only time when I can *almost* predict that I will lose a connection (that is, it happens frequently but not always) is when I send a large e-mail, which I need to do frequently for a newsletter. That will go slowly and then the problem often occurs. It is not simply a timeout because I lose all access. However, even that is not consistent, and I also will sometimes have the same problem simply by surfing the Internet. I'm even beginning to wonder if I need to consider DSL instead of cable.
MaryL
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wrote:

All I can say is that if you are able to consistantly duplicate the problem with the LinkSys router disconnected, then I don't care if it's a month old or 400 years old - it's not the problem.
Well, OK, I'll say one more thing: If the SuddenLink tech took the router out of the circuit, experienced the problem and then said he still suspects the router, he's a friggin' idiot. Blaming a router that is not connected to anything is akin to blaming the refrigerator, your mini-van or the neighbor's goldfish. You might as well replace them all to see if it helps.
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MaryL wrote:

changing out antenna?
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I am currently using a Dell Inspiron 530 and Vista Home Premium. Vista is full version, not OEM. HP w2408h widescreen color monitor Logitech Cordless Desktop MX 3200 Laser keyboard and mouse combo
However, the problem started more than a year ago (and has gotten noticeably worse over time). At that time, I was using a Compaq Presario T8000 and Win XP-Home Edition. Corded Microsoft mouse.
I also a HP Pavilion dv6830us notebook computer with Vista Home Premium (OEM). However, this computer is rarely used at home, so it is usually not turned on. It is primarily used for travel.
Connection to the Internet (for several years) is by cable. Origially Cox, now SuddenLink.
What antenna?
MaryL
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wrote:

You have an intermittent. Therefore if you bypass the router - connect direct to the cable box - well that intermittent is not causing failure. Therefore the test says nothing useful.
He had baseband numbers. Almost nobody here knows what is being measured - probably not even the technician. Numbers that mean nothing to him (other than they must be so large) or to you, also means that the next reply could be massively informative to the only person here who knows what they mean. If you short your help of information, then you get useless replies based in speculation.
Ok. TV cuts out periodically. You did not list which channel numbers cut out and which do not. So little is learned there.
Only Eudora fails on the internet? You mean another Window on that computer using Internet Explorer still accesses web sites while the first Window with Eudora does not? Yes, have multiple Windows open simultaneously (multitasking) so that both tasks access the internet at the same time. Then we have a serious fact to isolate the intermittent and make a useful reply.
Previous posts suggested using Ping. This is a test that even a 10 year old has performed. Open another Windows using Command Prompt. Enter the ping command as recommended to constantly ping that laptop (obviously laptop also connected to your network). Do same on the laptop to ping the Desktop. Leave those Windows open and pinging constantly. When Eudora does not access the internet, do those two pinging programs see a failure or do they still work constantly.
We must break an intermittent down into what works during failure and what does not. Ping tests when the intermittent is not happening tell us nothing. Everything in this post and in my previous posts is routinely performed by any adult. But some adults have never done it before - therefore assume it is too complex. It is not too complex even for a teenager. No fancy equipment is required. Anybody can do what was posted. But many so love to fear as to fear to even try. Ping comes on all computers. Set it up and do the test. The idea that you cannot only comes from silly fear - the reason why so many cannot learn.
You have right here the best help you could ever want. But you are shorting your help of facts. And leaving your help with gapping holes that result in replies based upon assumptions. If we must add assumptions, then the reply can be completely misguided. If you want to solve this, then every question - especially the ones you fear most - must be answered.
As posted previously, setup the desktop and laptop to ping each other constantly so they will be pinging (or failing) during the intermittent. List the TV channels that fail and do not fail intermittently - also no tools required. UPS does nothing for this problem. Its only function is to provide power during a blackout as posted previously. UPS and protectors do not solve anything related to your current frustration and, if connected to the cable, may even make problems worse. As posted previously and which is why the cable company so accurately recommends it, remove those protectors.
Never got back under the heavy desk to reconnect them. They do nothing useful. Never again connect them (against advise from every technically knowledgeable poster) only after the problem is solved. They can only make things worse. So once they are disconnected, you never again need to go behind the desk.
Finally, when Eudora does not work, does another Window on the same computer still access a web site? Another important question (and test) so that the best help you could ever ask for can post something helpful. No reason to go anywhere else. The problem is not 'where' you are posting. The problem: you are shorting your help of facts - not answering every question. If you don't answer all those questions, then the only replies will be from others who know only by wild speculation. And if you don't understand the question, then ask. Some recommendations are intentionally posted short so that your help can judge whether or not your really want to solve the problem. You don't ask for clarification, then you only want the wizard of Oz - not a solution.
You have an intermittent. Therefore the easiest recommendation typically solves nothing. That is the nature of intermittents. Your tech even saw the problem - and could not identify it? Well, he did only what techs understand. He did not have someone like me to talk him through the next obvious steps.
BTW, is your cable grounded to the same earthing electrode as the AC electric? Connected where both enter the building. Again, that observation is easily performed by anyone. If not, then that can contribute to your problem AND is a safety code violation. Remember that previously posted expression 'canary in the coalmine'? A human safety problem. Just another concept that cable techs either forget to check or never learned.
You posted:

I keep saying you are shorting your help of facts. You never said that before. Now I must assume you are not sure or ... well look. What exactly was connected to what when the cable guy saw the intermittent happen? Suddenly we discovered the router was not connected when failure happened? If that was true, then the cable guy did not suspect the router. Why did he suspect the router when it was not connected during the failure? You did not say why which means we are all adding assumptions to your posts. Just another reason why useful replies are not forthcoming.
You said you tried everything you could think of. But one who has far more technical knowledge than you, the cable guy, or most other responders said to check the cable and AC electric share a common ground. Why do you ignore that suggestion? Because you 'know' that could not be a problem? Again, stop shorting your help of necessary facts.
Provided again are things that you next post should answer such as the pinging test, never connecting that UPS or protectors until long after the problem is identified (yes identified - because fixing it comes later), and list of TV channels.
Look. You only think the surge protectors are doing anything because they are entitled 'surge protectors'. As posted previously - they do not even claim to provide surge protection. They are only protectors - not protection. How many people keep posting to remove all those protectors and UPS - and never connect them again until the problem is solved? The problem is not your replies. Problem starts by you making conclusions that only make a solution impossible - such as reconnecting those surge protectors. The fact that you have those surge protectors says you don't have the necessary basic knowledge. Stop shorting your help of facts. Stop making the problem potentially worse and impossible to solve by reconnecting those protectors and UPS.
Earlier in this post are numerous tests, list of numbers, and inspections. All must be done. If you really want to solve the problem, then you never reconnect those protection AND you do what is posted. You do it because it makes no sense to you which means it is probably the best solution you have.
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wrote:

You have an intermittent. Therefore if you bypass the router - connect direct to the cable box - well that intermittent is not causing failure. Therefore the test says nothing useful.
He had baseband numbers. Almost nobody here knows what is being measured - probably not even the technician. Numbers that mean nothing to him (other than they must be so large) or to you, also means that the next reply could be massively informative to the only person here who knows what they mean. If you short your help of information, then you get useless replies based in speculation.
Ok. TV cuts out periodically. You did not list which channel numbers cut out and which do not. So little is learned there.
No, the TV does not cut out. It works even when I have this problem with the Internet.
Only Eudora fails on the internet? You mean another Window on that computer using Internet Explorer still accesses web sites while the first Window with Eudora does not? Yes, have multiple Windows open simultaneously (multitasking) so that both tasks access the internet at the same time. Then we have a serious fact to isolate the intermittent and make a useful reply.
Again, no. The problem occurs most often when I attempt to send a large message through Eudora, but then I cannot access anything on the Internet. Moreover, although I see it more frequently with Eudora than elsewhere, the problem also crops when I am doing something simple on IE -- for example, when I click on a link within CNN.com. It also happens on some occasions when I am reading or sending messages in newsgroups. I'll try what you said (cannot predict when it will happen), but I think that essentially is what has been occurring anyway because I sometimes have IE open when I use Eudora and sometimes not. In either case, once the "drop" occurs, I cannot use either Eudora or IE.
Previous posts suggested using Ping. This is a test that even a 10 year old has performed. Open another Windows using Command Prompt. Enter the ping command as recommended to constantly ping that laptop (obviously laptop also connected to your network).
Exactly how is that done? What do you mean by "as recommended"?
Do same on the laptop to ping the Desktop. Leave those Windows open and pinging constantly. When Eudora does not access the internet, do those two pinging programs see a failure or do they still work constantly.
We must break an intermittent down into what works during failure and what does not. Ping tests when the intermittent is not happening tell us nothing. Everything in this post and in my previous posts is routinely performed by any adult. But some adults have never done it before - therefore assume it is too complex. It is not too complex even for a teenager. No fancy equipment is required. Anybody can do what was posted. But many so love to fear as to fear to even try. Ping comes on all computers. Set it up and do the test. The idea that you cannot only comes from silly fear - the reason why so many cannot learn.
You have right here the best help you could ever want. But you are shorting your help of facts. And leaving your help with gapping holes that result in replies based upon assumptions. If we must add assumptions, then the reply can be completely misguided. If you want to solve this, then every question - especially the ones you fear most - must be answered.
I am not deliberately leaving out any facts. You are undoubtedly correct, but I can't give any facts if I don't know what they are.
As posted previously, setup the desktop and laptop to ping each other constantly so they will be pinging (or failing) during the intermittent. List the TV channels that fail and do not fail intermittently - also no tools required. UPS does nothing for this problem. Its only function is to provide power during a blackout as posted previously. UPS and protectors do not solve anything related to your current frustration and, if connected to the cable, may even make problems worse. As posted previously and which is why the cable company so accurately recommends it, remove those protectors.
Again, no problem with the TV. There actually was a problem with the TV when all this started, but the SuddenLink technician solved that. I have not had any further problems with the TV.
Never got back under the heavy desk to reconnect them. They do nothing useful. Never again connect them (against advise from every technically knowledgeable poster) only after the problem is solved. They can only make things worse. So once they are disconnected, you never again need to go behind the desk.
I would need a power strip if not a surge suppressor because the outlet does not have space for all the plugs involved.
Finally, when Eudora does not work, does another Window on the same computer still access a web site?
No, everything is gone.
Another important question (and test) so that the best help you could ever ask for can post something helpful. No reason to go anywhere else. The problem is not 'where' you are posting. The problem: you are shorting your help of facts - not answering every question. If you don't answer all those questions, then the only replies will be from others who know only by wild speculation. And if you don't understand the question, then ask. Some recommendations are intentionally posted short so that your help can judge whether or not your really want to solve the problem. You don't ask for clarification, then you only want the wizard of Oz - not a solution.
You have an intermittent. Therefore the easiest recommendation typically solves nothing. That is the nature of intermittents. Your tech even saw the problem - and could not identify it? Well, he did only what techs understand. He did not have someone like me to talk him through the next obvious steps.
BTW, is your cable grounded to the same earthing electrode as the AC electric?
Both are grounded where they enter the building, but I don't know what an "earthing electrode" is.
Connected where both enter the building. Again, that observation is easily performed by anyone. If not, then that can contribute to your problem AND is a safety code violation. Remember that previously posted expression 'canary in the coalmine'? A human safety problem. Just another concept that cable techs either forget to check or never learned.
You posted:

I keep saying you are shorting your help of facts. You never said that before. Now I must assume you are not sure or ... well look. What exactly was connected to what when the cable guy saw the intermittent happen? Suddenly we discovered the router was not connected when failure happened? If that was true, then the cable guy did not suspect the router. Why did he suspect the router when it was not connected during the failure? You did not say why which means we are all adding assumptions to your posts. Just another reason why useful replies are not forthcoming.
I may not have expressed that well. I meant that the failure happened once while the cable guy was here. *Then* he had me bypass the router, but it did not cure anything. I don't know the answer to "why," and I even asked him that.
You said you tried everything you could think of. But one who has far more technical knowledge than you, the cable guy, or most other responders said to check the cable and AC electric share a common ground. Why do you ignore that suggestion? Because you 'know' that could not be a problem? Again, stop shorting your help of necessary facts.
No, the cable guy did not tell me to check that they share a common ground. If he had asked me to do that, I would have asked him to show me how. However, he made a couple of trips out to where the ground is and told me that everything is okay. He also changed out the splitters even though he said they were not causing a problem.
Provided again are things that you next post should answer such as the pinging test, never connecting that UPS or protectors until long after the problem is identified (yes identified - because fixing it comes later), and list of TV channels.
Look. You only think the surge protectors are doing anything because they are entitled 'surge protectors'. As posted previously - they do not even claim to provide surge protection. They are only protectors - not protection. How many people keep posting to remove all those protectors and UPS - and never connect them again until the problem is solved? The problem is not your replies. Problem starts by you making conclusions that only make a solution impossible - such as reconnecting those surge protectors. The fact that you have those surge protectors says you don't have the necessary basic knowledge. Stop shorting your help of facts. Stop making the problem potentially worse and impossible to solve by reconnecting those protectors and UPS.
Earlier in this post are numerous tests, list of numbers, and inspections. All must be done. If you really want to solve the problem, then you never reconnect those protection AND you do what is posted. You do it because it makes no sense to you which means it is probably the best solution you have.
Some of the instructons don't "make sense" to me in the sense that I have no idea how to follow through on them. It's like reading Greek.
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