connecting electrical cords in a home


Is there a safe and accepted (NEC) way to splice/connect two regular electric cords/wire where the connection is not inside a box ? I have a need to make a number of splices with regular extnsion cord type wire (reasonably heavy duty) and it would be much easier if there is some type of clip on type slicer. The lights came with clip on type plugs....is there a similar splicing clip for connecting the wires
Thanks, TR
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Be smart,,, buy a longer cord. You could be asking for trouble by rat shatting a bunch of cords together.
Trust me,,, I've seen what happens when trying to take short cuts.
tr wrote:

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tr wrote:

If you are willing to take the time you can do a creditable job by soldering the wires together, shrink tubing over the individual joints and then shrink tubing over the whole spliced area and about 1-1/2" of the cable jacket on each side of the splice. I can't comment on NEC relative to that.
It takes a bit of planning and the correct sizes of shrink tubing. I strip the wire ends only about 1/4" and interdigitate the strands before flowing solder into the joint.
Works for me....But, if you don't have the equipment and skill, take the safe route and buy longer extension cords.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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It's not so much the splice, but the legality of having an open splice in a non-approved box. There are temporary boxes for sale (for locations like construction sites) with legal bushings, covers, etc.
If your slipshod spice causes a problem (fire, electrocution, injury) you might be responsible for the damages.
Beachcomber
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On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 20:44:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.none (Beachcomber) wrote:

Is this a low-voltage lighting setup, something inside the walls, or an actual extension cord? The rules are different for all the cases, and I, at least am not totally clear on what you're trying to do, and why.
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I am not trying to be anal. I am trying to learn.
I would punctuate the last sentence as
The rules are different for all cases, and I, at least, am not clear.
Could you....The rules are different for all cases. And I, at least, am not clear.
I don't think starting with And or But is good practice either.
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I have used a butt splice kit to splice a feed to a well. The kit has a heat shrink that fits over the butt splices (you need a 20$ tool for this or a friend that has one) You can use a blow dryer or propane torch to shrink them. This was then buried in the ground.
I don't know if these are permitted on an exposed connection. The instructions on the kit should say.
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tr wrote:

Don't think NEC has anything to do with extension cords. There are a lot of ways of connecting these. I hope you are not using extension cord wire for permanent in house wiring! That would be a problem.
Those clip on type connectors, where you push a sharp point into the wire, should be left to low amp uses--10 amps or less (you said it was heavy duty wire so I assume more than 10 amps). If appearance is not a problem, just solder the wires together and wrap the joint with tape. If looks is a problem the best solution would be to just buy the cord in the lengths needed to eliminate joints. Or, you could just buy plugs and sockets and install on the cut ends and plug them together (buying new wire lengths would probably be cheaper). Or, you could buy and use plugs, outlets, and metal boxes to connect the wires
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It's already mentioned that it's a poor and probably unsafe idea to string extension cords together. But if you feel it is safe for whatever your application is, why not just put an outlet on the end of one and a plug on the end of the other? Of course I'm taking your subject as worded - you are talking "in a home" and not "outside a home". All bets are off if you are speaking of such a junction in an exterior application. I'm also not sure what kind of "lights" you are referring to in your last sentence.

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Sounds like an electrical fire waiting to happen. If you need a longer cord, replace it with a longer cord that is UL approved. Or, better yet, install an outlet where power is needed. Extension cords are only intended as a temporary arrangement.
On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 03:10:13 GMT, "mwlogs"

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