Condos-common walls

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Good Life wrote:

Which does not belong on the list?
1. Gonorrhea 2. AIDS 3. Herpes 4. A Condo
Answer: #1. You can get rid of Gonorrhea.
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I think you guys have probably saved me from making a major mistake. I will now rethink my housing plans. I never would have thought so many problems could arise in what looked like an ideal housing choice for someone who is getting on in years. Thanks to all at home repair.
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Good Life wrote:

Glad to be of help!
If the problem is maintaining your home you might ask your neighbors and friends about a handyman type, for minor repairs, and hire someone to cut grass etc.
Even those these cost bucks it will be far cheaper than selling your home and buying a condo.
just consider the realtor fees and fees to sell a home. 6 or 7% of the total equity in your home:(
If your short on cash and up in years investigate a reverse mortage, which will draw down on the equity in your home while paying you enough $ to cover costs.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Good Life) writes:

Ranch house (no steps) Or a modern trailer on a small lot. (Fairly cheap, allow you to put money you've put in your current house into something earning interest to help you live with the reduced income) Small yard (less maintenance, cheaper to hire out if you need to do so.) Close to local stores. (walk or scooter to the store)
The trouble with some of those, is that it can often mean less safe neighborhoods. Of course, the thing to do there is to work on a call tree with your neighbors. Something bad happens, call the police and then call your neighbors, who call the police and more neighbors...etc. The police know that if something happens in that neighborhood, they'll be getting a ton of calls... and eventually put the area on regular patrol. A friend of mine helped organize this in their "transitional" neighborhood and it really helped to clean it up. Not sure if this amounts to harassing the police though.
--
May no harm befall you,
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
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but I can see where they make sense for people in certain situations, like the snowbirds who are gone a third of the year, or folks like you that don't feel up to doing outside upkeep any more. You just need to go into the situation with your eyes open, do a lot of research, and take everything the sales guy says with a big grain of salt. If you can find a community where you already know some people, asking them for an honest account of their ownership experiences is a good place to start. A few hundred bucks to a lawyer to examine the tiny-print boilerplate contract before you sign anything is a good idea, too. Ask about worst-case scenarios- can the condo association spring huge suprise assessments, and are you locked into arbitration by their designated service in the case of any disputes?
Might I suggest renting a condo for a year? Perhaps you can find a rental in a community where the owner you rent from isn't quite ready to sell? If you can rent, and get the owner to share the paperwork over a years time with you, that would give a good taste of how well the place is run, how competent the management company is, etc. IIRC, the IRS gives you a couple of years to roll over the proceeds from selling your current house.
As to the physical aspects of a condo- most of the ones I have seen are physically similar in quality to mid-level apartments. The upper-end condos are about the same price as buying a fancy house, and just hiring a lawn service and regular handyman to do the outside work. Only the upper-end ones will have similar quiet and solitude to a private house.
Yet another idea- if you own your current house free and clear, and like it, and if you have the income to afford it, have you priced out just hiring out the work you don't feel able to do anymore? My father stopped doing yard work around ten years ago when he started having vision and balance problems, and found a guy to do the yardwork and simple outside upkeep. Costs 80-100 per month, depending on how fast the grass grows. That is comparable to the monthly hit in many condo communitys.
aem sends....
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:)
-- Cheri

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My sister just moved out of a nice condo to a different condo place. The old neighbors were so loud she got sick of calling the police. She moved to a better town, so the trashy types didn't have enough money to move to the new town. I'd have to be desperate before I ever moved to a condo. Couldn't stand living so close to people like that.
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They reminds me of where I used to live. I didn't like having to listen to loud Mexican music every evening. Then there was the dog that bit people (dog belonged to the Mexicans).

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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