Conditioning old blacksmith tools

While moving my mother out of her house we inherited some old blacksmith tools. The tools show just about every grade of rust from bad to worse but I would like to clean them and treat them. I plan on power washing (1800 psi husky) drying out in the sun. My question is if I plan on storing them for a year or so could I lightly treat them with 10-30 motor oil, and when they get to there final display destination would this grade oil slow the rust? Opinions welcome..................Doc
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Most people wirebrush and use black rustoleum, but I think that looks tacky. One year, for a gag gift for my brother, I had this 40" gear off an old tractor or something, that I paid 20 bucks for at a yard sale. I took it to local metalfinishing place and had it media-blasted and clear-coated with some sort of protectant. 10 years later, still looks good. He was supposed to make a sundial out of it, but never got around to it.
For what you want, brush off the rust and lightly oil it. You will probably lose the work patina. You want it to look like active railroad track or manhole cover- not rusty, but not babied. I'd use gun oil, not motor oil, if they will live inside. Or for no-stink, no-smear, use cheap car wax, just wiped on thinly and not buffed.
aem sends...
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On Aug 4, 7:04 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Before you power wash the items, check out Permatex Rust Dissolver Gel, #81756 8oz. bottle or # 82138 sray can. These are competently formulated versions on the well known Parkerizing or iron phosphating process. More effective and less work then wire brushing and leaves a rust rsistant coating behind, suitable for whatever protectant you want, or even paint if you'd rather. Some of the shop results I've seen so far in car restorations are quite impressive. HTH
Joe
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Joe writes:

Phosphate treatment is what you can buy in the store and is suitable. I like Loctite Extend spray.
Parkerizing is something else. Not something you buy in a store or easily applied.
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wrote:

Before you power wash the items, check out Permatex Rust Dissolver Gel, #81756 8oz. bottle or # 82138 sray can. These are competently formulated versions on the well known Parkerizing or iron phosphating process. More effective and less work then wire brushing and leaves a rust rsistant coating behind, suitable for whatever protectant you want, or even paint if you'd rather. Some of the shop results I've seen so far in car restorations are quite impressive. HTH
Joe
Adding just a little to Joe's solution, which is the right one... I would like to suggest that after you get them nice and clean... how about a nice coat of semi gloss polyurethane?
I've used it on things like an old milk pitcher and old tools. It works great. Even a coat of tung oil would leave a nice finish without ruining the look of rustic metal with paint.
--
Kate
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On Aug 4, 8:04 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I suggest removing the rust using the "battery charger" method:
http://www3.telus.net/public/aschoepp/electrolyticrust.html
After cleaning off the rust, then coat it with wax. Any kind will do, I use the car wax from out in the garage.
Ken
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