Condensors white or silver?

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If a refrigerator is used outdoors, in the summer. The condensor on the back, is black tubing. As we know, black absorbs heat from the sun shine, which makes the compressor work harder.
Of course, that condensor can be painted. Which color paint is coolest in summer, and works best to release the heat from the refrigerator? White, or silver?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Oct 19, 8:44 am, "Stormin Mormon"

I'd vote for silver. The more it reflects the better. But why is a fridge so exposed and so oriented outside that it's even an issue? If it's that exposed I would think there could be issues aside from the sun thing, which is probably minor.
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Temporary set up, for a camp that's only used during the summer.
One vote, silver.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I'd vote for silver. The more it reflects the better. But why is a fridge so exposed and so oriented outside that it's even an issue? If it's that exposed I would think there could be issues aside from the sun thing, which is probably minor.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

This ranks right up there with the debate on covering windows with aluminum foil: Shiny side facing out or facing in.
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On Oct 21, 6:07 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

No. Aluminun foil hats should be shiny side out, so the laser from the mother ship will be reflected and they can't control your thoughts. ..... Same for aluminum underwear.
When you get to be a grandfather, you gotta know this stuff.....
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"Stormin Mormon" wrote in message
If a refrigerator is used outdoors, in the summer. The condensor on the back, is black tubing. As we know, black absorbs heat from the sun shine, which makes the compressor work harder.
Of course, that condensor can be painted. Which color paint is coolest in summer, and works best to release the heat from the refrigerator? White, or silver?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org
What ever turns you on Chris. WW .
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Silver is a color of value, over the years. If you go to a fortune teller, she wants you to cross her palm with silver. On the other hand, white symbolizes purity. I need a few more votes.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
What ever turns you on Chris. WW .
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The condensor is black because black radiates heat better. To make it functioning that way, put an awning of some kind over the fridge to keep solar radiation off of it. White or silver doesn't make a difference, as long as it is as opaque as can be. In addition, rig a small fan up so there is additional cooling when the fridge is in cooling mode.
--
Best regards
Han
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"Black" in the visible range doesn't matter much at the far infrared wavelengths the refrigerator will be operating at. It matters some in direct sunlight because there is a significant component of sunlight in the visible range (duh!). My point is that its "color" in visible light doesn't mean a lot. The emissivity at the operating point matters.

Again, color doesn't matter, as far as the operation of the refrigerator, itself. If the object is to reflect visible sunlight, white is better.
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On 10/19/2012 10:24 AM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

An argument could be made that a specific type of silver paint, that with a high zinc content common in "cold galvanizing" types, might be a good choice because the zInc may be more conductive to heat transfer than an additional layer of regular paint.
Jon
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 10:30:35 -0700, Jon Danniken

That depends on the purpose. If it's to reflect sunlight, no, conduction doesn't matter (could make even the situation worse). Anyway, the point is that "white" is whiter than silver. White paint my have higher emissivity than a mirror.
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 13:24:23 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

How do you know that black paint doesn't radiate and absorb infrared better too? Because it's not visible, you can't tell by looking but you can by feeling.
I know that when I had a convertible with a black top, it was hot as hell in there after it sat in the sun. Once I caught on, I've had light green once and tan several time and it's almost comfortable even after sitting in the mid-summer sun.
Similarly a black steering wheel is hot enough to hurt one's hands when the inside of the car is hot. No other color I've had is. And the black seats would burn the inside of my thighs when I wore shorts, but tan and white don't do that.
And my home, which may well not have enough insulation in the attic, was too hot to go upstairs when I had a dark shingle roof, even with a roof fan. . The new roof is medium brown and it's comfortable now with just a fan in the bedroom (and the roof fan) . However I used to use the heat from the attic to warm the upstairs in the late fall and early spring. That doesn't work anymore, because it doesn't get as hot up there.
And the son of the owner of one of the two biggest department stores in Indianapolis (Block's) built a house next to his parents on their beautiful lot overlooking the White River. He had dark shingles and 1 or 2 months later in the summer they were replaced with white shingles. It was clear to me that dark shingles made it too hot inside.
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wrote:

His parents house was old and grand. It was built, I think, before home air-conditioning was invented, and I'm sure used a lot of design features to keep it cool in the hot weather, including being shaded by many trees. I suspect he was used to haviing the windows open and when he married and built his own home, he still wanted his windows open and no AC on most summer days, and so the dark hot roof was a real problem for him. The builders chose roof color for style, but he wanted white for comfort. And he had the money to change roofs a short time after the house was built. And why shouldn't he, since the roof lasted 20 years Ithink even then., 1962
Here's the google maps address of his house. 39.866245,-86.162188
I think it's the big white roof.;
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You don't. That's the point. The color in visible light has little to do with its emissivity at the (much) longer wavelengths. "White" paint might be much better.

So was my white car. So? See below.

So do my "cream" colored leather seats. So? See below.

Well, you do know that the sun emits energy in the visible range, right?

Ah, because it was the White River, it was cool in the summer, right?

See above.
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I was working on the bright shiny galvanized roof on my shed. It's was too hot to rest my hands on. I should try and measure temp of shingles next to it attaching garage. I got more cool or cold days in my climate, but my insulation on the house part is sufficient to overcome roof temp.
Greg
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On Sun, 21 Oct 2012 19:11:34 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

You don't know by looking but you can tell by feeling. In all the cases below, white and light colors don't absorb or radiate heat like black does.

I don't think so, but maybe under some special laboratory conditions. Can you show me any example from real life where that is true.
You just make light of all my examples below, but they are similar to the refrigerator condensor in the original question. If you want metal, just put a piece of white painted metal next to black painted metal in the sun and you'll see the same thing.

What are you saying? That the sun doesn't emit IR? Not so. Or that visible light causes heat? Of course it does, when it's absorbed by something,, and that alone is one reason black things absor and radiate more heat than white.
If he wanted to paint his awning whte, that would help a little.

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No, you really can't. You can pull a piece of aluminum foil directly out of the oven but don't try it with a cast iron pan.

Wrong. Visible color has nothing to do with it's performance in the infrared.

I *KNOW* so. Some materials are transparent in the infrared and opaque in the visible range, just like some materials are red, or yellow. What matters is the emissivity at the wavelength(s) of the incident radiation.

Other than the fact that the sun has a significant visible component, you're wrong.

I've only said it a dozen times now. Perhaps you can read it if I put it in all CAPS?
WHAT MATTERS IS THE EMISSIVITY OF A MATERIAL AT THE WAVELENGTH(S) OF THE INCIDENT RADIATION.

Idiot...
...doubled down.

WRONG, unless they're incandescent!

Some, because there is visible light in sunlight, but I've already said that. Perhaps you should READ.

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On Mon, 22 Oct 2012 09:29:38 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

You're dragging in thermal capacity Everything before this was about two things of the same nature of different colors. Not something that is 3/8" thick with something that 1/100" of an inch thick.

That doesn't contradict what I said. I didn't compare color and IR but the effect of black on both.

I asked for an examples from real life. and you don't even give an example from a laboratory.

This is not what you were saying in the sentence I asked about. That read. "Well, you do know that the sun emits energy in the visible range, right?" I presume you were trying to make one of the two possible points I could think of, but you don't reply civilly to either of my choices.

"glowing or white with heat. " No. It doesnt' require that.

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No, *you* are dragging it in by saying that your senses can determine this stuff. They can't.

"Black" is a color which you can only sense in the visible range. You're not making any sense.

Good grief! There are examples everywhere. Have you ever seen colored glass? It is transparent at some wavelengths but not (absorbs at) others. That's why it's colored. The same thing happens at infrared vs. visible. The lens on your TV remote control is opaque in the visible range but is transparent at infrared. There are millions of such examples. THINK!

There are two points. In sunlight, the color does make some difference because the sun emits radiation in the visible range. HOWEVER, the 'fridge's radiator does NOT incandesce so its color is meaningless. It could be any "color". I suppose you've seen anodized aluminum heat sinks? A blue one is no less efficient than a black one (IIRC, blue anodizing is actually better).

You're as wrong as you can be. The "color" only matters at the wavelengths being radiated. For a 'fridge's coils,that's *NOT* in the visible range.

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