Condensation around chimney

We just got done with a very cold winter.
On some of the coldest days there was a lot of condensation in the house right near the ceiling adjacent to the chimney.
I have a standard gas furnace that's about 22 years old and there is NO liner in the chimney. Various chimney repair companies have told me I should get a liner installed to avoid condensation.
I was about to do so then realized that I'll probably need a new furnace within the next few years anyway and now might be the time to not only get a high efficiency furnace but to get central air instead.
The 100 amp service in my 116 year old house is maxed out so I have hired a contractor to upgrade the service to 200 amps.
Now, my question: I still have a gas hot water heater using that chimney which will be otherwise unused. Is it likely I'll still get condensation on cold winter days?
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'philo*[_2_ Wrote:

I guess it all depends on why that condensation was forming. If it's a masonary chimney, then my guess would be that the cause of the condensation has nothing to do with the amount of flue gas rising up through the chimney, but the fact that masonary is a lousy insulator. Basically, the ceiling around the chimney was cold because the chimney was cold, and that's why the condensation formed where it did.
--
nestork

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On 06/08/2014 10:06 PM, nestork wrote:

Yep , it's a masonry chimney but the condensation was not always there. I've only had it since my present furnace had been put in in 1993...and we've had so many mild winters that most of the time there was no problem.
Though it's not a high-efficiency type it's certainly more efficient that the previous one that had been in there.
At any rate...it looks like I will need to do a better job of insulating that area...would it just be as simple as putting fiber glass insulation around the portion of the chimney that's in the attic?
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They tapped into the chimey on my gas water heater. It has a 6 inch ceramic liner. Seems ok, but I still need to install top hat. On the other house, I got same condensation problems. No liner, and the hole is over 10 inches. It also feeds to the older gas furnace. I don't intend to fix that situation, but I still need a top cover. On my old house, I installed a galvanized pipe down through the asbestos chiney. I figured it is best to narrow the system. It was easy as the roof was not steep, and had easy access, so I did it myself.
Greg
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On 06/09/2014 12:58 AM, gregz wrote:

This is not a job I'm consider doing myself. Even when I was younger, the roof here is too steep for me to ever have considered going up on.
I guess when I get the new furnace they will know how best to how to deal with the water heater. If it does need it's own exhaust pipe if it's not too expensive I'll of course get it done...otherwise I'll just switch to an electric water heater.
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On 6/9/2014 7:57 AM, philo wrote:

the regular ones, but it might be cheaper than the alternatives. I have one (LP) and my only complaint it that it is the noisiest water heater I've ever heard. It's not only noisy in the basement, but it's noisy outside where it vents.
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On 06/09/2014 07:27 AM, Art Todesco wrote:

<snip>

My water heater is only 4 years old, it seems too new to replace.
Well, thus far I have only committed for the new 200 amp service. That's something I needed anyway. When that gets done and I have separate circuits in the kitchen I won't have to worry about having the toaster and coffee maker on at the same time.
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I am putting my reply here rather than individually.
My house was built in 1898
I have been here for about 35 years and there is always something to do.
Since this is going to cost a few buck I guess I will only get part of it done this year.
If I get a high efficiency furnace and an electric gas heater and no longer need a chimney at all, what's the best thing to do then?
Should it just be insulated and capped?
To remove it entirely would be expensive.
If it does get removed I'll be saving that job for when the entire roof needs to be replaced...possibly in five years.
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On 6/9/2014 2:01 PM, philo wrote:

I would cap it. If you remove it you might influence the historic value of your house. Some historic society may tell you can't change anything outside the house that would change the appearance. This is common with older houses built in the 1800's.
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I'm not an expert on any of this, but we have a very similar situation. There's a chimney that's now taking only the water heater vent and there's a dead chimney. I hadn't heard the idea that the chimney might be too big for the vent. It seems to work fine. But we never had condensation, either. I find it hard to imagine that venting just the water heater through the chimney might be a problem. It's not a heck of a lot of heat produced. Mostly I'm just relieved that the furnace now vents outside with PVC. The house was built in 1835. It made me nervous to have the furnace venting through such an old chimney, which is partially buried in walls with no way to check for leaks or parge it.
We also have a dead chimney that I think had been used in the 1800s for wood stoves. The living room and upstairs bedroom both had a vent hole. It's been long dead now and was cut off under the roof, in the attic. When I remodelled the attic I capped it with concrete, mainly for two reasons: To prevent field mice possibly coming up to the attic from the cellar, and for safety, in case someone ever decides to put in a wood stove without checking the furnace first. (They'll get an awfully lot of smoke but at least they won't set the roof on fire. :)
In your case I don't imagine there'd be any reason to do anything about the chimney. It would take some work to dismantle it and reroof. As long as the bricks aren't falling, who cares?
|I am putting my reply here rather than individually. | | My house was built in 1898 | | I have been here for about 35 years and there is always something to do. | | | Since this is going to cost a few buck I guess I will only get part of | it done this year. | | | If I get a high efficiency furnace and an electric gas heater and no | longer need a chimney at all, what's the best thing to do then? | | | Should it just be insulated and capped? | | To remove it entirely would be expensive. | | If it does get removed I'll be saving that job for when the entire roof | needs to be replaced...possibly in five years.
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'philo*[_2_ Wrote:

That's where I'd start.
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nestork

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Went up into the attic.
When I insulated the attic 25+ years ago looks like I missed a spot. It's right where the condensation is worst.
I now have that part insulated.
Should I also insulate the portion of the chimney that's in the attic?
As to getting a new furnace with central air...so far this is shaping up to be a very cold Summer, so have postponed that project until next year.
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I think insulation would be good. I don't have an attic, insulation, or vents.
Greg
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On 06/11/2014 11:39 PM, gregz wrote:

Yes, I might as well insulate it
and also try to get rid of some up that junk I've stored up there.
When I was up there I found a lot of old computers and even a vacuum tube amplifier.
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On 6/12/2014 8:44 AM, philo wrote:

Vac tubes have a following. Please list on Ebay.
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On 06/12/2014 10:36 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'm keeping all my vacuum tube stuff that's small.
The large console radios, I can hardly even give away.
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Seems like collectors who restore them, are the only ones interested in them.
Greg
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philo  posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

Try an auction house. Depending on condition some people just eat this stuf f up and you could make a buck. IDK about EPlay because it would be a massive crating job to ship.
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Tekkie

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On 06/13/2014 07:53 PM, Tekkie® wrote:

The best I ever did was sell about six of them to a collector in Ohio...but I had to deliver them.
Since I was going to PA I dropped them off along the way...then the guy told me he'd have to pay me later.
Since I needed the van to be empty when I got to PA I had no choice but to trust the guy and...I'll be darned, about six months later he paid me the full amount.
I am no longer going to haul these off anywhere...it's more trouble than it's worth
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