Condensation

Hi new to the site
I wonder if anyone can help. In my home, on the inside walls which ar the reverse of the outside wall, over the last few weeks circles hav appeared which look like damp spots but are not. A casual enquiry fro friends is suggesting they are probably caused by 'institition o institution condensation' something about a dewpoint etc which left m puzzled.
The 'circles' match the 'dabs' spots ie the cement behind the plaste board. I have been in the loft and cannot see any water or dam running down the walls. The problem is only evident on the inside o the walls that are facing out. A quick check of the outside brickwor does not reveal any damp and my house is wall cavity sealed.
Grateful for any advic
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Could be cold spots where insulation is missing. Air could be getting in from outside in those areas, as in gaps in wood , holes in mortar. Exessive indoor humidity could make it noticable. Brick ties may be transfering cold, and improperly instaled. Are spots colder than surounding area. Look for bad mortar outside near spots.
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I have two rooms that seem to suffer badly from condensation. On cold mornings the Windows are covered in condensation and over a period of time the painted walls start to turn black. Is there anything I can do to cure this? Is there are special paint that I can paint onto the outside or inside walls to stop the walls from turning this colour. One room used to have a fireplace but I have now blocked this up. The other room a bed is up against the wall that shows signs of condensation. Any ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks
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Zinzan wrote:

You have a high indoor humidity problem. Is there a humidifier on the furnace? If so, turn it off.
The black is likely a sign of mold growth, not good.
You may also have an insulation problem which is allowing the wall surface to get too cold.
This is a complex problem with no easy answers. I would start by getting a hygrometer (humidity meter). In winter, a reasonably dry house should be around 50% or below.
Jim
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What is the humidity in your house, it is to high. Do you have forced air and a humidifier, if yes turn it off or disconect it . New tight house or old. you need to get air moving , fresh air in and lower the humidity. Use bleach to kill the mold and fix the cause first
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Buy a portable dehumidifier you have to much humidity in the house need to remove some of it or you have old cheap windows.
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I have two rooms that seem to suffer badly from condensation. On cold mornings the Windows are covered in condensation and over a period of time the painted walls start to turn black. Is there anything I can do to cure this? Is there are special paint that I can paint onto the outside or inside walls to stop the walls from turning this colour. One room used to have a fireplace but I have now blocked this up. The other room a bed is up against the wall that shows signs of condensation. Any ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks
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inside
against
============You can buy wallpaper size rolls of polystyrene (about 3mm thick) to prevent the condensation on the walls. You apply as normal wallpaper using anti-fungal paste and then paper over with your normal wallpaper.
Cic.
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From personal experience I can tell you this can work astonishingly well. In my last house this turned a wall where the wallpaper wouldn't stay up because of the damp into a permanently dry wall.
Another trick is to leave your windows open the tiniest amount, if you can do so without jeopardising your security. I've done so by removing the spacer between window and frame on my metal frame double glazing - just on one small top window per room. The effect is that the window fits slightly loosely - not enough to cool the room or cause a draft, but enough to cool the inside of the window pane.
This has eliminated condensation on my window panes completely. Admittedly, because I have double glazing, I started with less of a problem than many people, but it was still an issue until I tried this. It may at least reduce the amount even if it doesn't eliminate it completely.
Barbara
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inside
against
When I had this problem the only thing that cured it was a dehumidifier. They are not expensive nowadays, and work very well.
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Thanks for the information. It is a great help. One point though. I do have a de-humidifier. when it the best time to have this on, during the day to extract the moisture or during the night? thanks

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cure
a
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This might be worth a look http://www.safeguardchem.com/Damp/condens4.htm
Phian
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Condensation is only stopped by two things, heat and ventilation.
Your problems are made worse by having a closed fire place opening. If this was open it will allow air to circulate and reduce the condensation. With it closed off you will actually make the problem worse.
Your furniture needs to be at least 4" away from a uninsulated wall to reduce the black mould.
Your windows are easily resolved, open them. The amount of people who complain about condensation and then do nothing is staggering.
It is not a problem with the house it is the way you live imp afraid to say.
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you should really fit a air cover on the chimney breast, scrape the back stuff off the walls and check its not damp inside the wall, www.toolstation.com sell a Damp checker for around 9 the check upto around third of a inch into your wall for damp, if it is you need to dry that out (not a easy task)
If not wash the walls down with anti fungal paint, (B&Q) leave for a few days and cover as you desire...
Now you need to allow air into the room, the easiest but not cheapest option to change the pain of glass that has air inlet fitted. if you have just blocked the fireplace up, make a hole and fit a air hole cover.
hope this helps...

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