concrete "wall" over brick

So here's my story:
I was attempting to waterproof my back patio by chiseling out some cracks on my patio and then was going to patch and seal it. However, we have angled cellar doors out of the basement. The cellar door rests on angled brick which was covered with concrete some time ago (who knows when). You know, it's like a right triangle:
|\\ | \\ | \\ back of building ->| \\ <- cellar door | \\ | \\ ---------------- <- concrete patio
It looks something like that, but the angle of the door is much shallower (about 45 degrees).
Anyway as I was chiseling cracks on the side of the cellar door structure, the concrete basically all fell off in a few big chunks, clearly water had been seeping in and separated it from the old brick underneath.
Now my question is what should I do? Doing some reading, I'm thinking of scraping all the remaining concrete off, down to the original bricks, then making a cast out of plywood or somesuch and pouring fiber-cement to create a new, stronger, covering over the brick.
The brick is very old and I'm sure not weather proof (that's why it was covered with concrete, I'm sure). It does seem to be supporting the cellar door fine (not loose), which is bolted into the brick.
Any advice?
Also, while I'm here. My building is brick, attached on one side. The front is still exposed brick - in good condition. The side and back have been covered with concrete. Is there a name for this coating? Is it just concrete or some specific exterior treatment?
Other than cracks is there anything else I should be looking for in terms of damage? There are some cracks below the 1st floor window sills, but otherwise it visually looks to be in good shape.
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A photo is better
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Yeah.. you're right, I'll try to post one.
I guess the way i should've framed the question is, is it better to sort of plaster the concrete onto the brick, or build a cast and pour it in?
I feel like whoever did the last job, just coated it as water protection, but with the cellar doors putting strain on the concrete, it eventually cracked. Hence thinking that pouring a stronger, more permanent concrete around the bricks might be better & stronger.
On the other hand, I'm new to this and don't want it to turn into a major project. That said, there's no way to learn like doing.

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I completely agree. I might have to go buy a new bulkhead door and remount it on the new concrete footings or whatever you would call them.
But that said, I think it was pretty old. Also, terrible design. The bulkhead had weights on pulleys to make the doors easier to open. Since the weights were obviously put in when it was brick, they would knock into the concrete on their way down every time the doors were opened. There was clearly repair work already done to the "smack down" area. Pretty hilarious really, if it wasn't so stupid.
I've already removed the weights. A little more muscle is required to open the doors, and a strong wind might bang them shut ­ but much preferable to the concrete destroying weights.
I'm hoping that the lack of constant banging will make the new concrete last longer.
But I agree, if the old door is crap and unsealable, it will be a bigger project. C'est la vie.
I'm more concerned that it's leaky than it's moving. It seems pretty well bolted into the brick, and the brick seems pretty solid in terms of movement ­ just old and chipped and worn away.
-Ben
snipped-for-privacy@westnet.poe.com wrote:

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Well, you could just replace the whole shebang with something like this: http://www.gordoncelladoor.com/featcdrd.htm
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WARNING: Trying to fix a bad design with stornger concrete isn't goingt o help much. If the door is moving around relative to the house, then the concrete is going to crack. You could sink in bolts, put in concrete (which ever way is most conveinent) and then use the bolts to keep the connection strong, but...

So don't turn it into a major project. If you make this connection super strong but don't fix the underlying cause of movement, all you'll do is cause something else, whatevers weakest in the system, to fail. How old was what you removed? If you reapir it in the same way, it should last about as long... Failing that, build in expansion strips to absorb the movement. There are expanded faom strips that work fine.
John
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