Concrete tents - easy to build they say.

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Hope this isn't ot - these could be used for a garage, shop, chicken house, etc. Bob-tx
http://www.wimp.com/concretetents /
But, all that glitters is not plastic - read below
LONDON (AlertNet) - Two British engineers have scooped a global innovation award for an inflatable concrete tent, designed for rapid deployment in disaster zones, but aid workers differ on its practical viability. The inventors, Peter Brewin and William Crawford, say they saw a need for the structure given the inadequate protection provided by tents in the aftermath of disasters such as the Pakistan earthquake. 'With shelter and medical facilities it is possible to rebuild shattered communities from day one of a crisis,' they said in a statement. The tent, made from fabric impregnated with concrete, can be put up by an untrained person in 40 minutes. It takes 12 hours for the concrete to set, but once done, the tent can last for up to 10 years. The two designers, both 26, developed so-called Concrete Canvas during an industrial engineering course at the Royal College of Art in London. Their efforts were rewarded on January 26 at a ceremony in New York with the presentation of the top prize at the Saatchi & Saatchi Award for World Changing Ideas. Media reports say the invention has attracted interest from the United Nations and several international humanitarian agencies. JUST ADD WATER 'If this was available now, we would buy 10 today,' Monica Castellarnau, a programme director at M'decins Sans Fronti'res, was quoted as saying by Wired News. Its combination of ease of assembly with durability has also drawn praise. The logic of Concrete Canvas is simple. Each unit ' weighing 227 kg (500 lb), making it light enough to transport by plane or truck - comprises an inflatable plastic inner bubble, wrapped in the treated fabric and packed in a plastic sack. To deploy the tent, the sack is first filled with 145 litres (32 gallons) of water, which is absorbed by the cloth. The sack is then cut open, the tent is unfolded and the plastic bubble is inflated. The canvas then moulds around the bubble and sets to form the solid infrastructure of the tent. The finished shelter covers some 16 sq meters (172 sq feet) of floor space and the cost per unit is estimated at '1,100 ($2,100). But some aid officials are not convinced. 'At first sight it looks marvellous,' said Rishi Ramrakha, a logistics officer at the British Red Cross Society. 'But the real practicalities look a bit difficult.' According to Ramrakha, there are several central problems. First, the unit is too heavy to be carried easily into areas where there might not be access for aircraft or trucks. The second is the amount of water needed to erect each tent. 'Where are you going to get 145 litres in a disaster zone?' he asked. Experts also point out that displaced populations are accommodated in temporary shelter because they will eventually be encouraged either to go back to where they came from, or to make homes and a new life in a better place. The construction of permanent structures, particularly in conflict zones, could hamper that process, they say.
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"Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote in message

It's heartwarming that you're worried about OT posting something that actually has to do with homes in AHR.

That was my first question. My second is "how do they do the doors and windows? My third is "I've seen this sort of thing before" in Puerto Rico, I believe, or at least the same sort of building techniques. I recall someone describing the difficulties involved with all concrete homes and they were intense.
Used in places like Pakistan I'd imagine they'd become permanent slums. Way back when (when we were still friends with Quaddaffi Duck) the company I worked for used to ship flight simulators and spare parts in those big Sealand containers. They would never come back because Libyans would take them and turn them into instant houses. And we're worried about them?
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

How many disasters happen in deserts?

Doesn't have to be clean, potable (drinkable) water.

You don't think they already live in permanent slums there?
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http://www.google.com/search?q=water+shortages+in+disaster+zones
Click the above link and educate yourself. I'm a little too busy to do it for you. I'm married to a retired Army logistician. Water can be awful hard to come by in a disaster area, especially an earthquake zone where pipes break and water towers collapse. It does NOT have to be in a desert by any means. There are three things that are part of every disaster relief package. Water stations, generators and temporary housing. There are entire US Army manuals devoted to the subject. Google around, I'm sure you'll find information about it.

Osama had a nice $1M compound in a very nice neighborhood in Pakistan. Not everyone lives in slums in Pakistan, India or in many places in the third world, contrary to your assertion. Wealthy neighborhoods suffer the same kind of earthquakes that poorer ones do. The fear of relief agencies is that emergency housing would cause people not to move back to their original towns or rebuild their original housing.
Emergency housing is almost always erected on someone else's land, not the land of the occupants of that shelter and that can cause serious disputes. In India such relocation has resulted in many deaths as rich farmers, who often own the land emergency shelters are built on, hired men to displace the people they see as squatters. As you can imagine, those squatters fight hard to stay because they usually have no place to go. So that's why experienced aid workers might see a problem in the concrete shelters.
-- Bobby G.
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"Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

-snip-
Not to mention that a concrete tent is a little more difficult to take down and move than a canvas one.
But for a quick and semi-permanent outbuilding, I think it might be interesting to play with. Didn't Bucky Fuller make some of his domes with concrete covered fabrics?
Jim
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Bob-tx wrote:

I remember years ago the Marine Corps experimenting with structures whose main characteristic was inflation.
The structure - as I recall a 12x12' dome - came in two boxes. The first contained a balloon in the desired shape and an air compressor. The second largish box contained some spray-on foam.
After the "tent" was inflated, the air compressor was hooked up to the foam machine and about a foot of expanding foam (think Great Stuff) was slathered over the plastic bubble. The foam set up rather quickly and doors could be cut with a saw.
Think igloo.
The Marines discarded the idea.
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On Jun 14, 6:33am, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

might be useful for nuke power plat accidents, like the current japanese one
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On Tue, 14 Jun 2011 05:33:26 -0500, Bob-tx wrote:

I'm gonna build a concrete car.
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I've seen concrete boats. Why not? Airplane anyone? ;-)
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On Jun 14, 7:36am, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Mythbusters built and flew a balloon made of lead so why not.
Harry K
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You're comparing apples to bridges.
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And you're not?
Harry K
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Huh? What comparison did I make?
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" I've seen concrete boats. Why not? Airplane anyone? ;-)"
Shouldn't need to have that pointed out. You compared one type of transportation to another and I did the same. You seem to trying to get a fight started or something. Have a problem with my rare posts do you?
Harry K
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Go back up-thread and figure out who posted what.
You're quoting from other people's posts and attributing their words to me.
Apology accepted in advance.
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"Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote in message

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On Jun 14, 6:33am, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

The article says "To deploy the tent, the sack is first filled with 145 litres (32 gallons) of water, which is absorbed by the cloth. The sack is then cut open, the tent is unfolded and the plastic bubble is inflated"
The video says the tent is inflated first then saturated with water.
The video method seems to make more sense since I can't see how a folded up tent is going to absorb water evenly.
What happens if it rains for few days as the concrete is setting?
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Probably nothing. Concrete can be poured and will cure under water. I did that with a very small irrigatin dam. Had to put the concrete down a big pipe or it would mix with too much water on the way down.
Harry K
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How does it mix with too much water on the way down but not mix with too much water once it's actually down?
As the dumb jock once said about a Thermos keeping hot stuff hot and cold stuff cold:
"How does it know?"
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Once in place thd watet does not mix into it. On the wayi down the mix is fluid, agitated, etc.
Concrete is commonly placed underwater but usually by being pumped, not dumped as I was doing.
Harry K.
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