Concrete question


Plan to pour concrete slab and build on top of slab...One row of concrete blocks. The question I have - will mortar anchor blocks to concrete? or should I put some anchors to tie blocks to concrete? How is this typically done? TIA
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I would..for our CBS short walls on slab, I dropped in a 3' length of rebar every third block and filled those cells.
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On Aug 18, 6:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

You'll have to pull a permit, and follow local building codes. Go down to city hall and sit down with the inspection staff and get the right answers to your questions. It could even save you some time and money by avoiding common mistakes.
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Where's it gonna go?
Idea: After the concrete is poured, wander around the perimeter poking sections of rebar in the still pliable concrete such that about 8" is sticking up. Lay your cinder blocks. Wherever there's a rebar, fill the void with concrete.
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HeyBub wrote:

Is this down south where frost isn't an issue? Not sure that would even be legal up north here, other than maybe for a shed. IMHO, if a structure is going over a slab, the slab needs footers. They could be monolithic pour at same time slab is poured, with rebar hooks to add a row of block to keep the bottom of wall dry. But if it is a real building, I'd sleep better with a conventional foundation, and slab poured inside and resting on the foundation ledges. That is how garages and such have been built here in frost country for close to 100 years.
-- aem sends...
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This is for shed and it is in "frost country" 42" frost line........the concrete will be 4 1/2 inches with a 12" rat wall.
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Dave, if you mean the ground freezes to 42 inches deep, you will not get away with a mere 4 1/2 inch deep pour. Thats only for southern areas well below the freezing zone.
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On Aug 18, 7:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

"Anchor" is somewhat of a vague term, but that's what they use to set bricks.

If you're in an earthquake zone code might require it.

As cheap as possible.
I think you may planning a project more than a tad beyond your level of expertise. Unless you're building the most structurally significant doghouse on the planet I don't think laying block is a DIY- type thing. -----
- gpsman
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I don't think laying block is a DIY-type thing.
Sure it is but what I wonder is why he's only using ONE row of block. Then, is there a bottom plate and stud wall above (attached to) that ?
Ifso, why use ONE row of block at all ..whynot just put the bottom plate right on the concrete (with a gasket of some sort of course, in between) with anchor bolts as in common construction practice.
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Rudy wrote:

To keep the sill plate out of the puddled water or half-melted snow, of course. Exterior wood wall should never rest directly on a slab. Always give gravity a chance to take the water elsewhere. And even with a gasket (which fails at some point), having sill at floor level almost guarantees wet floor inside, especially if slab extends past the outside perimeter of wall.
-- aem sends...
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Not much of a builder would grade a lot to allow "puddles" right next to the structure and if its a buildup of snow we're talking about, a single row of 8" block isnt going to keep much snow off the exterior wall.
I daresay there are thousands of homes built on "raft slabs" or post tensioned slabs where the bottom plate rests right on the slab(gasket).
I' ve seen them framed that way in both timber frame (regular "2 by" and also PTL) bottom plates and metal framed as well.

Now that, I ve never seen- the slab shouldnt extend out past the wall(s) and wouldn't likely be passed by a plan/building inspector.
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