Concrete problem

The concrete in our garage is not cracked but is best described as decomposing. The top layer is turning to sand around where the car is parked. We have tried various sealers and paints without success but nothing sticks to the concrete. A contractor said it must be removed and a new floor poured. We bought this home new 40 years ago and that expense at this time would best be avoided, if possible. We use the garage as a doorway; consequently we bring the cement residue into the home on our shoes. We thought about garage type carpeting but wonder if anyone had success with an alternative? Thank you for your recommendations,
--
Lidia


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Lidia wrote:

There is no real fix other than replacing what you have. However - if the situation allows, you may be able to add a few inches on top of what is there. I really don't suggest it as you will still need to dig out some at the entrance to provide a "ramp" to the new level and ... well it is just not that much cheaper to do it right.
One other suggestion would be a commercial type carpet runner at the entrance.
http://www.consolidatedplastics.com/acbnew/index.cfm?&DID 
Is where I get mine. Quality stuff. There are other sources, but the stuff at the local big box store is not.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Thanks for the web site info and recommendation. They have much to choose from. We have a Home Depot and Menards, both stock a rubber product called Parking Pad made by BLT. Also, if the floor is raised I would need to have the door re-installed as it too would have to be raised an equal amount. Lidia
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You may have a bigger problem that that. Fire code requires that the garage floor be 4" or more below the house floor. If you encroach on that distance you may be kicking a bigger tar baby.
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you
Thanks, I did not know that. I just checked and the garage floor is 8" below the house floor. However, the outer garage walls are not finished on the inside so the 2X4 which lays on top of the foundation would be covered if another layer of cement were applied. I don't know if that would be a no-no?
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I would not bury wood in concrete. You could form up the inside the wall with something like Durock and pour to that. You still will have to get as much of the bad material out as you can to provide a good substrate for the new concrete. I would talk to the concrete contractors to see what they think is the thinnest overpour they will gurantee. There are some grinding machines that will knock that crumbling concrete out but I have no idea what they cost to rent or hire with an operator.
BTW I bet your floor failed because it dried out before it cured. Concrete doesn't reach most of it's strength for almost a month. You should keep it wet and allow it to cure slowly. If it dries out too soon the top will be significantly softer than the bottom, which did stay fairly moist and it will "spall" off with the changes of seasons and the effects of expansion, contraction cycles. When you get your new floor, I would recomend that you keep it covered with plastic for at least a week and that you squirt water under the plastic every day. You want to see the plastic "sweat" over the concrete.
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Your floor most likely doesnt have enough Portland Cement. No paint will hold, A top coat of cement may crumble with the tire friction. I had extra indoor out door carpet I just used strips where I walked , it was slippery. You may find a large commercial rubber mat, but it has to be designed for tire friction , tires turning. Start ckecking auto stores or car groups . If you skim coat it may last years but a failing - weak base will eventualy lead it to fail. If you try coating removing as much as possible will help.
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Eh, our garage floor is level with our house floor.... Does it make a difference if the whole house has a base made of cement or not?
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This is a fire code. It has to do with flamable liquids and vapors coming into the house. There should be a step up into the house.
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In the UK at least, an acceptable way round this is to raise the doorway, put a step in it, so that you step up onto the step, then down again to get into the house.
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decomposing.
tried
concrete. A

home
but
There are come concrete toppings that MIGHT help. Prep of the area will be critical. You will probably need a powered concrete rougher to get into the body of the concrete. Just putting paint/epoxy down never works. Try going to a Sherman-Williams dealer, they have some concrete stains, at least around here they do. Read up on the prep needed for the work before you consider this. The topping might come off after a few years any way.
I have seen this before but never on something that old.
Call around for some topping applicators and see if their prices will be any less. Probably will be close to new concrete. Check the guarantees
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Thanks for the help; I have called the 4 companies listed in the yellow pages under Concrete Coatings and Restoration. All have answer machines and none have returned my call. Business must be good? I saw an epoxy coated floor at the auto dealer which was (beautiful) but could not find out who applied it. I bet it cost more than a new concrete floor. I have read that there is a bonding agent but as you pointed out it is all in the preparation. Also, if the floor is raised I would need to have the door re-installed as it too would have to be raised an equal amount. The house is 40 years old but the problem began maybe 20 years ago (I guess) and just gets worst. It is a progressive decay that keeps spreading. Lidia
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<< The concrete in our garage is not cracked but is best described as decomposing. >>
This is typical of concrete that is short on portland cement. If it is exposed to even small quantities of salt from winter de-icing the decomposition spreads like a rapid cancer. There is no cure for this problem. Live with it and set aside budget money every month until it can be done over right. Then make your contractor understand that you want minimum 5 1/2 bag mix or better concrete. Anything you spend on this problem now is money wasted. HTH
Joe
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spreads
I had the house built by a general contractor. Begged, borrowed and stole the down payment plus a 20 year mortgage. Over the years I came to believe that the contractor got 50% or more out of it. Lots of problems! I think you have the answer to the floor, if Portland cement is expensive I would bet the mix was 0%. I appreciate your reply. Lidia
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Sounds like you bring something that deteriorates concrete in on the car and it falls on the foor. Could be salt or other chemical from snow control if you live in the north or something else if you live where there is little snow.
First, you need to wash the floor with a power washer to help stop the deterioration. A temporary solution is to cover the concrete with something. Take you choise: Plywood, vinyl flooring, outdoor carpeting, or other. A cheap solution may be to find carpet in good shape but just ripped out of a house because they didn't like the color anymore. You can't imagine how long carpet can last-- I've seen carpet laid out in the alley and constantly travelled over by lots of cars that lasted for years (looked like hell and was very dirty but lasted). They only caution is that anything you actually drive on should be tied down securely by glue, mastic, or screws into the concrete or your car might not stop (the covering slide) when you put the brakes on. Good Luck
Lidia wrote:

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I live in the Chicago vicinity so our winter highways see lots of salt or sodium chloride, a long time ago they spread ash. Salt could very well have contributed to the problem as it stared in the location of the car tires. I am searching for a runner of some sort that will cover the walk in portion of the garage. I looked for a material with a surface that will not be a slipping hazard when wet but I did not question if the material itself could slide. Some indoor/outdoor carpeting I saw has a rubber backing which might be OK? Thanks for your tips.
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