Concrete Porch Higher than Threshold

Two weeks ago, we poured a concrete porch 8' X 12' X 2' high with a 5' wide concrete ramp. The forms were built up to the slab level at the front entrance to a log building used for church services. Total cost: $700 and much labor.
The water in the building after the rain confirms that the porch is too high and/or the slope away from the door is inadequate.
Here is a pic of the entrance before the porch was poured:
http://www.fototime.com/6F34F91E482C1DB/orig.jpg
The location is 60 miles north of Houston Texas.
The options that I can see: Build a roof over the porch to keep the porch dry. Break up the top of the porch and repour it lower. Build up the threshold and hope no one trips over it. Chisel a gutter in the porch along the building to channel water.
We want a solution that is safe, cheap, and easy on our backs if possible. What are our best options? Is there a solution I missed?
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on 10/7/2007 12:39 AM Charleyboy said the following:

Ok, except for driving rain, unless you build a lobby around the door, which is probably a good idea in any event.

$$$ and not so easy on the backs

No. The ramp was built for wheelchairs and oldsters, right?

Maybe with a metal grate over it so that no one steps in it and turns an ankle or falls.

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Bill
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I think it would be cheaper and more positive to modify the threshold and the entry interior.
The door can be shortened. The threshold can be raised. You can use weather stop thresholds, though most of these don't honestly meet handicap. You can raise the floor on the interior -create a tiled entry -ramp up a concrete floor with tile or carpet over floorstone. -modify a wood floor as required.
A covered entry is always nice, but won't stop wind driven rain. It may well be a nice addition to reduce the problem. It will be difficult to make a porch that blends gracefully with your eave overhang unless you continue it out for both car and walk traffic.
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On Sat, 06 Oct 2007 21:39:09 -0700, Charleyboy
Threshold:

I would build a roof over the porch. That will provide a dry-area just outside the door. Given how much rain you get, that should be an advantage.
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Porch roof, protected out of weather safe spot for everyone. Done right can be nice building accent.
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Nothing will stop some wind driven water from getting through the door in this case. The best solution is to lower the porch. I would seriously consider a roof and side enclosure to protect the entry from the rain if not willing to lower the porch.
Don Young
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