Concrete Expansion Bolts For Railing Fastening ?


Hello,
I have the typical waist high wrought iron railing on the steps going to my front door.
It has been fastened to the concrete via a few blank holes. It looks like the screws they used were just fastened to the holes via a concrete mix.
After a large number of years they have pulled out.
I can clean up the holes in the concrete using, I guess, a concrete bit in my drill.
I think that I would like to use some type of expansion bolt made for concrete that is recommended for jobs like this. Is this the best approach ?
There seem to be zillions of different types available.
Anyone care to recommend a good type (& brand/style)for this ?
And, I guess, even more important, what kind to stay away from ?
Any thoughts would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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When I did the same thing I used the rivet type, about 1/4" hole, insert and smack with a hammer. I chose that one because that is what all the builders were using at the time.
Still going strong after 15-16 years.
If you ever need to take them out you just grind off the heads.
Colbyt
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Bob wrote:

Hilti is the best, many styles available for the particular task.
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The fact that the original bolts failed makes the chances of getting a good anchor with expansive bolts risky. If the concrete was new and well cured it would be different. A much used safer technique these days is to drill and clean the holes out and install stainless steel studs bedded in epoxy. There are several companies supplying material for this and the end result is far more permanent than Tapcons or Redheads from a corrosion standpoint. The cost is a bit more than the expanders, and there is a wait for cure time. Also, low temperatures mean waiting for better weather. This technique is frequently used for repairing rusted out toilet mounts on slab foundations.
Joe
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OP-
I would concur with Joe's comments & suggestion. Expansion anchors work by applying "expansion" forces to the concrete & can crack the concrete if there isn't enough edge distance.
I recommend SIKA AnchorFix #1 or #3. Number 1 is super fast set, gel in 3 to 5 minutes, cure in 1 hour. Number 3 is much slower, 1 hour gel, 24 hour cure.
If you choose Number 1 be ready and prepared to set all the SS rods QUICKLY....otherwise the product will harden in the mixing nozzle! And you only get two nozzles per cartridge. :(
The nice thing is, they work in a standard caulk gun.
In SoCal, SIKA products are available at HD.
I would suggest minimum 3/8" SS threaded rod. www.mcmaster.com if you cannot get it locally. Or use some fully threaded SS bolts & cut the heads off.
As Joe mentioned, low temps will slow the cure but with the #1 this would be an advantage.
cheers Bob
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I third Joe's advice. Use epoxy, not mechanical expansion.
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