Concrete Driveway Patch Job

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Just looking for a patch job so it's at least presentable and last maybe a year. I'm sure the right way is to dig up entire sections, new pack, etc.
http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic$mbwqb&s=5 http://tinypic.com/view.php?picrzrc4&s=5
Have no real knowledge of concrete/driveway work. Thoughts are to cut out bad hole area with maybe a rental tool, dig out some whatever is there, toss in some stone, put in some concrete or something, hope.
Been sortta keeping an eye out for someone having driveway work done to hit em up for a side job but no luck yet.
Anyone wanna toss out some hack attacks?
Red...
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Chisel or jackammer out the bad section. Google concrete repair. Buy some good concrete tools. It doesn't look like a big job, and it'll last longer than a year. Keep it covered with plastic for a while when you're done to keep it wet.
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mike wrote:

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic$mbwqb&s=5http://tinypic.com/view.php?picrzrc4&s=5
That looks bad to me. I'd wait till you had the money and replace the whole thing. Looks old and crack in other areas. Patching concrete never works and looks like crap. Make sure new driveway has plenty of expansion joints so the crack shows up in the joint not in the middle of the slab.
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I tried patching a hole like that and it heaved up the next winter.
Any chance you live in NC, I think I know that driveway.
This isnt a good time of the year to do concrete work I would wait a few weeks for things to warm up a bit.
Jimmie
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That's why you need to chisel the edge so that the bottom of your hole is larger than the top.
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That crack down the middle could be a tripping hazard. I think you should try to grind down the high side edge and clean out the crack and caulk it. The big hole in the center needs to be pulled out and replaced with stone and at least 4" of concrete
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tmurf1 wrote:

Geeeez the whole damn thing is a mess. I wouldn't even bother unless you're planning on replacing the whole thing. You're talking concrete saws, jack hammer and compactor and that's just to prepare it. Get a bobcat in there and tear up the whole thing and pour a new driveway. I day and it's done. Get some damn estimates all it takes is a phone call!!!
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wrote:

I agree. This is beyond a patch job. If you're planning on staying in the house for a while, might as well enjoy a new driveway. If you're planning on selling, the patch will stick out like a sore thumb. It'll be easer to sell with a nice new drive.
Get some estimates.
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On Apr 7, 12:24pm, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:
m> wrote:

This isn't the facade of a building or a kitchen countertop. It's just a damned driveway. If it's functional and looks a little worn, I wouldn't mind saving thousands of dollars that can be put to much better use.
I-5 has worse patches where I live. :))
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On some of the bridges in NYC, at one time there was a news spot where they showed from the roadway where you could see the Hudson & East River through holes! At least you could see rebar where there was missing concrete:-)
Yea it's functional and not getting worse by the month. I don't plan to be here that much longer and could beef up a lot of other stuff for the bucks. The pics isolate the bad part and I agree, looks nasty. Just wanna "soften" things up. Those two sections showing represent like 1/3 the length of which the rest is decent, not perfect but acceptable. There's also a 20x24 carport with smoothed concrete that has flaws at all.
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Presumably the OP is planning on selling the property in the next year or so. The problem is that first impressions are critical in the current real state market and a crap driveway will send a significant percentage of potential buyers on to the next house. It's not like they don't have lots to choose from.
It would actually be better to replace the drive now rather than next year as it will give the vegetation time to grow back and look a little less raw.
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On Tue, 07 Apr 2009 19:24:27 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

I see local ads, for 8x20 4" patio pad -- complete for $800.00. People need work and a new driveway may be real cheap right now.
Construction here hit a wall. It's a good time to have work done...
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wrote:

Yep, FAY. Still ringing a bell? If so, where do you know it from?

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I think you would be better off just replacing the entire driveway. If you wanted to save some money, you could rent a jack hammer and take the old driveway out yourself.
Any patch is going to look like a patch.
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I think that if this was my driveway I might hire one of those guys with the big wet saws to cut out the bad spot and perhaps a couple of strips in the old work to remove the worst of the cracking and make the patch look less like a patch and more like a geometric design.
Then you can compact the substrate and pour inserts (with expansion joints between). The whole shooting match can then be painted or sand blasted to obtain a more uniform look.
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I think you'd find that the labor to do that will come close to or equal the cost of hammering out the old drive and completely replacing it.
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*I'm wondering what kind of base there is? From those holes it looks as though there is just dirt. That may explain why the driveway has come to this. I think you are better off waiting until you can do it right. Why waste time and money on a crummy patch job. Maybe you can get someone to come in with a big wet saw and cut it up into manageable pieces and then remove them one at a time.
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My hack attack idea would be to knock out the bad hole area as you said, clean out the whole, mix and pour in some concrete, and smooth it out. I wouldn't bother with any rental equipment for such a small area that is already broken up. A sledge hammer and a crowbar will do it easily. You could try some cement crack patcher/filler to fill and level out the long cracks if you want.
Can you have an asphalt driveway put in where you are? I am not sure how big your driveway is, but it doesn't look to be too big. I had an approx. 900 square foot driveway removed and replaced with ashphalt about 2 years ago for $2,800. I got a few estimates and they all came in at almost exactly the same price except for one that was 50% higher. All of the estimates included removing the old driveway, adding some modified stone to the existing base and digging out and adding a new base of modified stone for part of the driveway that was being widened, compacting the modified stone, adding a 1 1/2 to 2 inch coat of ID2 asphalt as a stabilizing layer, rolling and compacting that layer, adding a finish coat of ID2 asphalt on top of that, and rolling and compacting that. No deposit up front. They did it all in one day and I paid them at the end of the day when it was done. While there, 3 other people on my street asked the same guy to do theirs and he did them all (including mine) over a 2-3 day period while he had all of his equipment there. It looks excellent two years later.
To get the estimates, I made a list of asphalt contractors and called about 10 of them. I left a message describing what I wanted done and I gave them the address. Many never called back. 3 or 4 did. One gave a price over the phone based on the dimensions. 3 others looked at it and gave me an estimate. It's an outside job so you don't have to be there for them to go out and look at it and give you an estimate.
Red Green wrote:

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That is what I'd do. No matter how you do the patch, it is going to look patched, the only clean spot. If it does not lift out by hand, leave it alone and patch with a couple of bags of Sakcrete. You should get a year or more out of that.
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I would probably want a new driveway. It looks like the rest is pitted as well, which means you will never really get a match with a patch job. You could powerwash to help the colors come closer, but the pitted areas will pick up dirt more quickly.
That being said, I suppose a decent patch would be to remove all of the loose pieces and undercut the edges to prevent heaving as best you can (which may not be much). A layer of stone, 4" of concrete, and broom finish it. Then I would address the crack as a possible tripping hazard.Since you probably aren't going to slabjack that, maybe a sloping patch. Once that is all completed, a pewter or gray concrete stain (after sufficient curing time, which is months to a year, I believe) may make the whole area look a little more uniform. I saw that paint was suggested, but it might be better to use a stain which doesn't reduce traction.
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