Concrete curb repair

On the street in front of my house there are 3 broken sections of curbing, each about 20 inches long.
The total opening where the sections should be is about 60 inches long. The 3 broken sections fit together fairly well(like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle) and I plan to put them back in place,cement them, level them.etc.
Some of the aggregate stone is missing on the underneath of the pieces and from the spots they go in.
Our city used to do this, but no longer does so(that dept. was cut from the budget).
Any tips on the most efficient and least costly way of accomplishing this would be most appreciated. I am assuming that some combination of sand/concrete/ and stone will be the answer.
However perhaps there is a patching material that would work just as well to hold the sections together.
Thank you very much,
Bob
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wrote:

The most effective way is to cut it out, build up a good foundation of gravel and repour them, like the city used to do. If you are just trying to stick them back together, epoxy and doweling with #3 or #4 rebar may be the best solution but it is a lot of work for a sloppy fix of 5' of curb.
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Bob wrote:

problem, wonder when the first lawsuit will be filed against the city. Replacing curb and gutter is not that easy specially if asphalt is involved. Your solution will not work, first major rain storm will erode you temp. fix. You need to take that section of curb out and probably some of the road surface to get it formed. Then replace asphalt. This is not a homeowner type fix. Your city has morons sitting on its council.
If I were you I would trip over the broken curb and sue the shit out of your city. Bet they would fix it then.
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evodawg wrote:

In all odds, the <city> didn't build the curb, or do any replacement of sections. It was probably one of the local concrete flatwork companies, under contract. City crews might do the digging, but setting up the forms and doing the pour is skilled labor. Some profiles of curbing are actually slip-formed, sometimes by a machine. Cities can go years without needing any new curbs- doesn't make sense to have all that just sitting in the barn.
If it bothers you enough to pay for it, I'm sure a few phone calls will find whoever locally has the forms and concrete finishers to do the job. Note that city will have to give permission- they either own the land the curb is on, or have an right-of-way easement from you that the street sits on. This will not be a new type of request for them- people with commercial frontage often spring for new curbs and pretty driveway aprons, rather the the crude curb cuts they would get from the city, or replace city-owned sidewalks in front of their stores if they are too nasty looking.
But no, like the others said, there is no practical (or cheap) means of repair- when a section fails, remove and replace is the indicated cure. From your description, it does sound like there is some sort of washout under there, from a big chuckhole, failed drain, or whatever. The new curb sections will need a good substrate, or they will quickly fail as well. If street has never been resurfaced, they may be able to get away without cutting back the asphalt, as long as they don't find any voids that extend under there.
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aemeijers wrote:

In my city and most in California the developer installs curb and gutter and sidewalks. When the project is sold out and before the second lift of asphalt is placed the city goes through and marks out the damaged areas for replacement. Contractor comes through and breaks out the damaged areas, re pours them, (city approves or finals curb and gutter and sidewalks)strip of asphalt is replace, and final lift of asphalt is laid. City buys off on project and owns them. If tree roots damage sidewalks or curb, city replaces them or contracts them out for replacement. Even if a sidewalk lifts due to tree roots or compaction problems they get replaced. City is liable. Also at all intersections wheel chair ramps must be installed on all corners.
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evodawg wrote:

I don't know where you live, but a lot of local municipalities have trouble funding essential services like police and fire departments, let alone curb repair.
Greg M
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wrote:

I have over 300 feet of broken curb. When my house was constructed the heavy construction equipment broke up the curb. Someday the city will charge me to fix it, and it won't be inexpensive. In your case you might get by with Quikcret concrete patch.
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I have the same problem. Patching it is just a temporary fix as the old concrete sections moves independent of each other (side-to-side and up-and-down) which results in cracks in the new patch/repair after a few months or within a year or two. Today I'm going jack hammer the broken sections out, level out the subbase and tomorrow compact with plate vibrator and pour a new section with rebars. I'm recycling the old concrete for another project as the dump fees are ridiculous here.
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yep and the first time a vehicles tire hits the curb it will break again:( instantly:(:(
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