concrete cabinet bases in garage

Can I set concrete bases for garage cabinets, directly on the existing garage floor? Concrete bases are for providing a level surface and elevated surface for floor to ceiling style garage melamanie (sp?) cabinets. They would be approximately 4 inches tall, formed out of 2x4 or 2x6 depending on top elevation of base to garage floor slope. The garage floor concrete is new and I wasn't planning on any steel or connections from new/old concrete.
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You could use concrete, but easier would be a wood frame with adjustable legs
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m Ransley wrote:

Or just PT 2x4s fastened to the floor.
Only potential problem I can see with concrete curbs is the possibility of moisture wicking up to the melamine (particle) board. Not a real problem IMO.
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dadiOH wrote:

I'm thinking OP has sloped floor so he's thinking he can pour level...
2x works if shimmed or tapered, of course.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

I am in the arid southwest (az) and moisture doesn't tend to be an issue. The reason for the elevated concrete platforms is two fold. The garage floor slopes out to the door, and the concrete bases would be level at their surface. And with the cabinets elevated on concrete, I can hose out the garage floor without getting the cabinet wet or having them sitting in the water. It is a very common where I am at... I am trying to figure out if it can be done retrofitted on a garage floor, or if it is more common to integrate into the original concrete work...
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mesquito snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Sure you can, no reason not AFAIK. If it were me, I'd probably spike them to the slab with a few 1/2" rebar pieces set into drilled holes maybe an inch or so deep in the slab.
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mesquito snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Hadn't thought of it, but seems perfectly reasonable approach...
No problem. You planning on a solid block or just a 3" wide (say) dam to set the base on? Probably would pay to run a piece of bar through it to help w/ cracking if it's a very long run. If is going to be full raised slab would definitely put a piece of reinforcing mesh in...
If slab probably enough weight to not need to worry about tie into existing slab. Otherwise, I'd probably drill a hole in the existing slab and put a few pieces of short bar in to hold it in place....
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Solid concrete. Basically a 24 inch deep step that goes the length of both sides of the garage, similiar to a washer/dryer step up commonly found in the rear portion of a garage that has that equipment. I have alot of other concrete showing up for other jobs, so it just a matter of adding it to an order...
Duane Bozarth wrote:

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mesquito snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

In that case, just make sure your forms are adequate and the existing slab is clean and dampen it....laying down a piece of wire mesh would be good but not mandatory. You finishing? Got a corner edging tool to put a nice finish on the corners on hand?
OBTW, you might consider at least one or two expansion joints in a relatively thin pour like that for that length...
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If you wanted to get carried away, you'd dowel it (short lengths of rebar epoxied into holes drilled in the slab) and replicate any expansion joints in the slab in the new pour.
For such a trivial application, tho, I'd just have 'em pour the new concrete on forms in place on the wet but otherwise bare concrete. There'll be some motion and some cracking, but it's such a light duty use that shouldn't really cause any problems.
John
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On 1/25/2005 8:58 AM US(ET), mesquito snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

I just built a wooden frame out of 2 x 4s, tapered to level for my old kitchen base cabinets, now serving as storage cabinets. They aren't even fastened to the floor or to the cabinets. The cabinets are screwed to the wall studs, same as is done in the kitchen. Been there about 15 years now.
--
Bill

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On 25 Jan 2005 05:58:23 -0800, mesquito snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Don't see why not.
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