Computer monitor problem

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wrote:

Too bad Microsoft dont think this way! According to them, we need to keep upgrading, (for no real reason), which often means buying a new computer, reinstalling all the programs, (and some no longer will work), re-learning the new operating system, and all upgraded or new programs, and finally about the time you get all of that completed, it's time ot begin all over again with the latest bloated crap from MS.
I was perfectly happy using Windows 98 to operate my "tool". I finally bit the bullet and went to Windows XP. I was prefectly happy with that too. (And still am, because that's as far as I am willing to upgrade). But now MS stopped supporting XP.
Windows XP, Windows 98, and even MS-Dos served me well, and were useful tools. I still use all three of them. Maybe these are like comparing a hand saw and an old basic circular saw to a modern push button saw with hundreds of bells and whistles, but those OLD "TOOLS"work just fine and make me productive. Give me one of these new fangled saws, and I'll spend the next month reading the manual and wasting a lot of lumber. It's the same with computers. I know exactly how to use my old computers. I have no need for more bells and whistles or more power or anything else, nor am I willing to waste the next year trying to relearn it. I already know I'd stick the new computer in the closet and go back to my old one after a few days, and lots of cus words.
MS can "offer" upgrades, and that is fine, but FORCING us to upgrade is WRONG!
I'm sure someone will reply to this by telling me to switch over to Linux. Dont bother..... I tried it and briefly played with it. I hated it. It's far worse than relearning an upgrade to a MS operating system. Not to mention lacking any real support, and also not able to run all the programs i already know, so I'd have to relearn everything. On top of that, Linux is doing the same thing as MS. Constant bloated upgrades!
Several years ago, I managed to install a 5 year old version of one of the Linux distros. I had it on a CD which someone gave me, so I installed it on a spare computer and for the first time ever, I got Linux to install and work without a glitch. But although it was installed, I found little usefulness from it. I went on an online web forum and asked some questions. I was nearly decapitated with remarks about using an outdated version, almost as if "HOW DARE YOU". I downloaded the newest version of that same distro, it would not install. I went back to that forum, and was given info that I did not understand at all. That lead to a couple dozen people telling me to use a different distro because the one I had was junk. So, I left there with suggestions for instaling 20 or more different distros, and no help whatsoever with my original questions..... I tossed that CD in the garbage and turned that spare computer into my file storage computer.
Linux is like having a tool in my toolbox, which does nothing but take up space. I'll never use it, because it serves no purpose!
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc writes:

Too bad for you.
I hope anyone reading this doesn't miss the part about you installing something 5 years old and then expecting help.

For you.
Personally, I've been running Linux for a very long time now, well over 20 years. One interesting thing, I use the Fvwm window manager. My user interface is exactly the way I want it and hasn't changed one bit in all that time.
--
Dan Espen

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On Wed, 02 Dec 2015 17:27:39 -0700, Don Y

the counterfiet electrolyte was used in the capacitors were doing GOOD to last 5 years without some performance degradation from the bad caps.
The new boards with "solid" caps should last 20 years.(or more) - outliving 4 or 5 power supplies.
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On Wed, 02 Dec 2015 21:27:57 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

One of my computers is 15 years old and works perfectly. When I first bought it, I put in the maximum RAM it would handle. I have replaced the hard drives, but not because they went bad, I just needed more space. The original internal CD drive died too, but I did not need it, and I just use an external one on the rare occasion I need a CD drive.
I did have to replace the power supply about 6 years ago. Otherwise it's all the original system.
Last summer I took the whole thing apart to remove all the dust that had built up under the mobo and inside the power supply, etc.
I use it almost every day. It's a Lenovo!

What are SOLID CAPS (capacitors)?
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On Wednesday, December 2, 2015 at 10:24:06 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

It could be an IBM...but not a Lenovo! 15 yrs is just too old to even run XP!
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On Thursday, December 3, 2015 at 9:26:40 AM UTC-6, bob_villain wrote:

...to the morons and anals: I'm not saying it won't run...it's just pointless in something that old when there is free (or next to nothing) that is much better. 10 yrs ago (approx.) they had DDR2 and SATA.
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On Thu, 3 Dec 2015 07:26:27 -0800 (PST), bob_villain

that Lenovo took over IBM - so he likely has an IBM thinkstation - same thing as was later sold as a lenovo.
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On Thu, 3 Dec 2015 07:26:27 -0800 (PST), bob_villain

Geezzzzzz, I cant win either way..... If I say it's an IBM, people always correct me and say it's a Lenovo. Now I'm getting the reverse..... Yes, it IS an IBM. It's a 2000 model.
I also have a newer laptop computer that says IBM (Thinkpad) on the lid, but the built in (software) Operating Manual says Lenovo. Thats from the mid 2000's.
I never tried to run XP on the 15 year old desktop computer. It came with Win 2000. I have both Win 2000 and Win98 on it. (dual boot). It's main use is for file storage and graphic editing. It does everything I need it for, in fact I prefer it over XP for what I do with it. Not to mention that Win 2000 and Win 98 do not need to be reinstalled every few years like XP does. The laptop has XP on it, and it seems like XP just slows down after a year or so, and that's even after I remove all the cache, and other temp or junk files regularly. Finally it gets so bad that a reinstall is required. This is a pain in the ass, because then I have to reinstall all the programs and tweak all the settings.
On the other hand, Win 2000 and Win 98 dont need to be reinstalled. If I were to have a problem, I can just copy the entire operating system from my backup drive to the user drive and not lose any settings or installed programs.
By the way, I'm not connected to the company or advertising, but I have had very good luck with all the IBM/Lenovo computers that I have. They just keep working year after year.... I cant say this for Dell..... I've seen much newer Dell machines just self destruct.
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On Thursday, December 3, 2015 at 3:21:41 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

I liked W2K, to me it made XP unnecessary. I haven't had much experience with Lenovo to judge...but my new and used Dells have been excellent. I can't say the say for the HP's I've run into!
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote: ...

right after you do this next time get a partition image saved to a USB. makes the next round as easy as a partition restore. much easier than redoing all the install/settings.
songbird
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On Thu, 03 Dec 2015 15:18:51 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

service pack 2 installed (on xp - SP 1 on 7), anyway.

I runClean My PC registry cleaner from registry-cleaner.net. I have the paid version, but even the free version does wonders for a slow XP machine.
There are other "registry-cleaners" out there that STINK. This one works. IOBit's Advanced SystemCare does a good job too.

Hell. I have good luck with the higher end Acers too.
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On Thursday, December 3, 2015 at 4:09:54 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Stick with automotive repair...it seems you know that...most all PC experts/professions say reg cleaners are "snake oil"!
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On Thu, 3 Dec 2015 14:19:06 -0800 (PST), bob_villain

are snake oil - others work. These two work. I do not need to reload windows to solve slow running computers. That says something.
My last computer, running XP, went over 5 years without a re-install. The only re-install prior to that 5 years was due to a failed hard drive.
You are free to disagree and continue reloading windows. No skin off my back.
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On Wed, 02 Dec 2015 22:21:29 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Not sure if they are tantalum,polyester, or what - but quite a few high end boards are using them, particularly where low ESR is required
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I was getting some flicker and spontaneous exit (from MS-Word) problems whe n using MS-Word. Nothing rendering my computer inoperable but a definite an noyance. MS-Word is the application I have been using most lately. Many her e suggested replacing the power supply. I googled on the net for the expect ed life of power supplies, and my impression is that most people say ten ye ars is way too long to go without replacement (either pre-emptive or due to a power supply failure). Yesterday I replaced my computer's 10-year-old 35 0 watt power supply with the least expensive one I could find in stock at B est Buy. This turned out to be a 400 watt unit, priced at $40 before taxes. It has reviews by over 300 people at the Best Buy site, and a 4.7 out of 5 stars rating. It was easy to replace. I fired up the computer and instantl y noticed a faster response for loading applications. I used MS-Word for a half-hour and did not have any problems.
Thank you to all for sharing once again. It's so liberating to be able to d o one's own repairs and so minimizing being a slave to technology.
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On 02/25/2016 09:35 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

<bullshit snipped>
Too soon for April 1
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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On Thursday, February 25, 2016 at 9:49:53 PM UTC-7, Tony Hwang wrote:

No, just spontaneous distortion of the letters when in MS-Word on occasion, and occasional spontaneous closing of the application with a request to se nd an error to Microsoft.
I was using MS-Word yesterday and flipping through spreadsheets for a coupl e of hours. Everything is running flawlessly and faster. I am delighted. I checked eBay and Amazon and think I could get the same, brand new 400 watt Insignia power supply for around $10 less. Now that I have some experience on this point, next time I will buy a power supply from the net.
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On Wed, 02 Dec 2015 13:53:29 -0700, Don Y

They most likely had the defective capacitors that swamped the chinese (and even low end japanese) electronic world in the late 80s or early nineties (and even into the early 2000s)

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On 12/2/2015 7:23 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I first saw the cap problem on a "quality" IBM desktop. I've also seen it on high end Dell servers.
(plus, of course, the run-of-the-mill machines).
They're common in monitors (esp LCD's as those tend to bottom feed in terms of quality) as well as TV's and assorted power supplies.
But, all electrolytics will eventually fail given enough hours at a high enough temperature. Be especially wary of those that are in "condensed" packages. I.e., if you're having problems finding the same value/voltage device in a particular physical package size, chances are the (original) device *will* be a problem!
I've also encountered under-rated caps in power supplies in cheap consumer kit (like the $19 DVD players), professional grade organs (think "rock bands"), etc.
[One advantage to volunteering at a recycling center is you get to see how devices fail and "bad design choices" -- important if you're interested in making quality products in big quantities! As well as which products to PERSONALLY avoid!]
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