Compressor/Nailer Advice

I'm starting on several projects that will require finish work. All of my windows will be replaced. And I'm remodeling my kitchen/dining area. I will have all my window casement to replace, some door casement, and all of my baseboard on the main level. When I finished my lower level, I hand nailed the trim. Never again!
I'm shopping for a compressor and finish nailer. I already have a Dewalt 18-gauge brad nailer (D51238K). It was free with a table saw I bought last year. I'm currently debating between the Dewalt D55155 Air Compressor and a Porter Cable Pancake compressor. If I go with the PC, I can get 2 or 3 PC nailers in a combo deal. If I go with Dewalt, I have to buy a finish nailer. Either the 15-gauge or 16-gauge.
Any experiences that point one way or the other?
Should I get a 15-gauge or 16-gauge finish nailer?
Thanks for your help,
Steve
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Go with the 15-gauge angled. Its a good compliment to the brad nailer you have. Angled will get into tight spots better plus you will have more nail choices. The Dewalt aircompressor used to be, or is, made by Emglo I think (Some Dewalts anyway). Its an oil lube design. It will be a bit quieter and will last longer. I also like the design. Should do everything you are asking of it. The PC pancake will also work but will be louder, need to re-charge more frequently, etc. Also, the dewalt looks like the guts are protected by a plate and the fittings are mounted to that plate, the pancake IIRC is not like that. If that's the case the pancake is likely more prone to damage. The PC is a great value though. If I wasn't too price sensitive, if it were me, I would go with the Dewalk (Goven your two options). If I was shopping on price alone then the PC would be my choice. Good luck. -B
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Steve,
I personally would buy a belt driven compressor. Once the pancakes piston or connector rod breaks, it's history. If the compressor breaks on the belt driven compressor you can replace it. Plus you have more air capacity. On the nailer, of all I own if I could only keep one it would be the angled (Stanley Bostitch SN60FN) nailer. Replacement parts are easy to find and it's easy to work on, a very good nailer. Hope this helps.
J
lefty wrote:

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Sure the belt driven compressor is more durable, but the better ones are not very portable. He is going to be working in every room of the house. He is also doing a home improvement, not running a production shop. The pancake makes a lot of sense that way. Mine has been flawless for 5 years now. It does what I need to do at reasonable cost.
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Talked to a guy at Seven Corners Hardware in St. Paul, MN tonight. He recommended the Dewalt D55155 compressor over PC pancake compressors. He also recommended the Hitachi finish and brad nailers. He said Dewalt, PC, etc. are all made by the same company. They see too many problems. Hitachi and Senco are the way to go. He just liked the Hitachi products more. Another contractor supply store recommende the Hitachi as well.
So as of right now, my package would include:
Dewalt D55155 compressor Milton Flex hose, 1/4" Hitachi 15 gauge finish nailer Hitachi 18 gauge brad nailer
Unfortunately, none of this stuff will ever be on sale. But I have a month or so before I will be forced to purchase. I'll keep my eyes open for any deals. 7 Corners hardware is priced the same as Amazon, Home Depot, and others. Advantage is they service everything they sell. I will have to put money in the hands of the local guys, I think.
Check them out:
www.7corners.com
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