Compression fitting leak

Page 1 of 2  
Under my trailer, some 1/2 inch soft copper sprang a leak. It's not in a great place for working. I called the trailer park, and they sent thier man out to shut off the water. I cut out about a foot of tubing, using a tubing cutter. I sanded the ends of the tubing, using some sand screen. I used two compression unions to put the new tubing in. Well, hours later one end of one fitting is dripping, about one drop a second.
I tried tightening the fitting down a little harder, and it's still dripping. Any good old country wisdom for stopping a compression fitting from dripping?
--

Christopher A. Young
.
.



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
easy, just go to the hardware store, buy a small bottle of pipe thread dope....use it on the threads of the compression fiting.....it is not for sealing, but rather for lubrication of the threads....you will be able to tighten the nut a full turn or more with the lube....it is amazing how dry brass threads bind up...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did spray the fitting with WD-40 before tightening. Might need thread dope, or some grease on the threads to slick it all together.
--

Christopher A. Young
.
.

"news" < snipped-for-privacy@bbc.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Keep tightening? Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's the easiest answer.
--

Christopher A. Young
.
.

"tom" < snipped-for-privacy@msn.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I seem to get more leaks when I sand it then when I don't. I know you are an HVAC guy, why not solder it together with refrigeration couplings?
JK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually, that's my next step. I've got some more tubing. It's just in a challenging spot, and there's fiberglass hanging from above that gets on me.
Old copper, I find stick braze works better than solder. For whatever reason, solder is less likely to seal old copper.
--

Christopher A. Young
.
.

"Big_Jake" < snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Big_Jake wrote:

I thought all those HVAC guys would, following their own advice, call a professional plumber ... and that business was so good they didn't live in trailers.
--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Big_Jake posted for all of us...

He is no HVAC guy he's a hack.
--
Tekkie GRIP = Get Rid of Incumbent Politicians

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So far none of you have it right use no dope and don't over tighten as this will only cause it to leak worse. And never use a ring that has been used once then retighten it again. I have a suggestion look to see if your tube is true round as if it isn't you will get leak, if it is solder it which is the right way compression is for weekend plumbers who are to lazy to learn how to solder. 35 yrs plumbing has taught me that do it once or do it forever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin Mormon wrote:

I don't sand. You may need to get a new fitting and slide a new ball over the end of the tube. Before I did that, I'd try taking the fitting loose again and then wrapping the threads with teflon tape, then retightening. I always used teflon tape for compression fittings... both stainless and copper... back in the day when I was maintaining a scuba fill station. If it didn't leak with 2500-5000 psi of air behind it, it won't leak with 50 psi of water either.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My best results have been when I used steel wool (no "digs"), then coated threads and mating parts with Si. grease. Use two wrenches to dog the fitting down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's a good thought. I'll try teflon on the threads, and then crank it down. Or, maybe I'll cut that all out, and silver braze in some new tubing. The silver braze is more work, but more likely to last.
--

Christopher A. Young
.
.

"Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You must have a flaring tool. Use a flare union.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've had success twisting teflon pipe thread tape into a "string" and putting about two turns of it around the pipe adjacent each end of the ball.
Easy to see why that works once you think about it.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 22:33:53 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Is the ferrule slid onto the tube fully? Is it compressed symmetrically?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is the ferrule slid onto the tube fully?
CY: Yes, it should be. I pushed the tube good and hard into the end of the fitting.
Is it compressed symmetrically?
CY: I don't know. Since I don't have X-ray vision, I'm not sure how to tell.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Take it apart and see if it crimped equally.
A compression fitting on such a low pressure system should seal without any problems. It should never need any tape of sealant.
If your install is leaking then the tubing is scarred or cracked, the fitting is defective, or most likely you introduced grit into the ferrule which prevents it from sealing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 22:33:53 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

I always coat the compression ferrule and the fitting threads with rectorseal (sp?) pipe dope before assembling and tightening. This lubricates and seals at the same time. I've never had one leak since I started doing this.
HTH,
Paul F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Paul Franklin wrote:

Ferrule... that's the word I couldn't think of when I posted my last response. If he has any doubts at all about the integrity of the tubing ends, he needs to recut them, slide the nut on each end, then the ferrule until a little bit of tubing pokes out... maybe a 1/8" or so. Then with teflon tape on the male threads of the fitting, put it together and torque it down using two wrenches in opposition. The ferrule will slide within the compression nut to wherever it needs to be as it's tightened down and will deform within the fitting to seal itself as well.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.