Compound Miter saw info and recommendation

Page 2 of 2  


Not sure about the 'new' Rigid line, but, I'd steer away from the Ryobi if you're planning on using in on a regular basis. You'll always find a project around the house where it could be needed.
I have a Delta 10" cmpd mtr saw. Had it for about 3 years, it does a great job and get a lot of use.
It will crosscut a 4x4 or 2x6. I'd have to flip a 2x8 over though.
I would think most 10" models would have similiar capacities.
I've had to make several miter cuts where the 12" would have been useful.
Go with the 12" if you can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Have you looked at Hitachi's sliding miter saw? It's far and away better than Ryobi, Rigid, Delta etc.
Boden
Ron wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I went through a similiar decision process and finally went with the Bosch 10inch slider. Tool Crib had it discounted deeply at the time.
Must say the saw is precise / smooth / relatively quiet/ and comes with a very high quality blade.
I've cut everything on it from 3/4" balsa strip 1/16" thick to all the 5/4 pressure treated deck boards and 4x4 posts for my new 16 x 32 ft deck. I can't say enough good things about it.
Get the hold down and the wings for it if you go that way.
Bobby

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm pretty sure the "new" Rigid line is made by Ryobi (and the one Ryobi tool I ever bought, for light use, lasted 2 weeks. That's a pretty lean definition of "light"). At least that's the general concensus from those at rec.woodworking.
I bought the Dewalt 10" 703. Great saw but I don't think it will cut a 4x4.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ron wrote:

Have you considered a radial arm saw?
I had one set in the middle of a 16 ' workbench. Not portable by any means, but much more versatile than a compound miter. Keep in mind that a miter saw only crosscuts. A radial arm will do all that the miter will do plus rip cuts. I could throw a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood on the bench and rip it in half.
It' not in the workbench now, I've got it on a makeshift stand in the living room of my cabin.
http://www.mts.net/~lmlod /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Portability isn't a major factor, but I already have a 10" table saw, an additional saw to do ripping isn't a big need. Besides, $600 or $700 is way out of my price range (and my needs).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Mike O.) writes:

What the other folks said about the Ryobi. It'll be OK for light use over a period of time but it won't last or stand up to heavy work.
The interior trim work you can hand cut (I lean towards mitering/coping rather than straight mitering), but a CMS is a must for construction-type work (as opposed to finish carpentry).
I've used the DeWalt 12" CMS (borrowed from a buddy) and currently own the DeWalt 12" SCMS. Good tools and will handle any of the dimensions you mention in your post, so my vote would be for the DeWalt 705, based on fence height, table durability, and solid lockdowns on the angle settings.
Most articles I've read comparing CMS/SCMS consistently rate the DeWalts highly, the only downchecks they get are weight (57 lbs for the SCMS), poor dust collection (don't bother buying the dust collection bag - sold separately), and some reviewers don't like the handle layout.
Me, I like the beast.
Best,
Marc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As opposed to the $30 circular saw I used when I did framing? :)
Granted, it was late 1970's so tools have improved in availability and price. I don't think I can hang a picture without an air nailer now days but when I was a kid we spent 8 hour days swinging a 22 oz framing hammer over our heads with 16D commons.
No, I don't miss it.
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff Cochran writes:

When I built my shed (10'x12') I used both (yep, my CS is a $30 Skil-speshul too). But for the repetitive length and angle cuts a stop block and locked down angle settings were a godsend rather than measuring/marking/cutting each piece separately.
Of course the half-lap joints for the framing on the 4"x6" headers I did with a hand saw . . .

Didn't use a framing nailer on the shed either. I agree, swinging those 22oz barstids gets old, especially when you're pushing 50 with an increasingly shorter story stick.
Best,
Marc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/03/2003 10:44 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com, "Mike O."

Hitachi, they patented the dual rail system.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
opined:

I'm not looking for a slider, too much $$ for my wallet & my needs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dewalt 705S 12" compound miter saw. Commonly available, nice accessories available, not too pricey. Very good ergonomics. We've had one a decade, I think, and it still cuts clean and square. $300 at Home Depot or Amazon, less when on sale.
We've occasionally considered upgrading the 705S (my other tools include a Unisaw, a PM54A 6" longbed jointer, and so on: we can spend some serious money on tools if we want) but never seen the need.
--
Dennis M. O'Connor snipped-for-privacy@primenet.com
I've got two riding mowers: one is 1200lbs, the other 5000 lbs...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Mike O.) wrote in message

Mike, I honestly think you might be asking for more headache by narrowing it down like this.
I also went that route some time back, buying at the lower end. It did not pay off. The waste of materials, the increase in labor, the annoyance factor, safety -- I wish I'd bought a Makita long ago. You pay once and you're good to go 20 years.
From the very first cut, the superior tool makes enough difference to make a difference.
Try a few saws, don't take anyone's word for it. Even at Home Depot, they have days when they can set up tools for trial use. Cut a few boards. (When I did that, I abandoned all thought of buying anything less than the Makita L1013, the unique twin linear bearing was so different in feel and comfort level, it was convincing.)
Don't forget that buying the tool is a down payment. You'd be surprised how much expensive material you can wreck with a cheapo tool. (And how quickly.) You need to set it up too. Sometimes that means a new blade (maybe $50) or a whole station - think $90 to $200 for a miter saw stand that suits your way of working.
If you really don't need to own a tool - why not rent? If that pinches the time element too much, buy a GOOD tool, keep it absolutely clean and in good shape, use it for your big project - then sell it. If you buy junk, it has almost no salvage value. Buy a big name brand and it will sell for almost what you paid for it a year later.
Heck, in Ebay, it can sometimes sell over retail.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.