Complexity of dyes in kitchen cabinets

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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

And you tried to change it to a spec - which would have been an initial spec. The response above is perfectly appropriate to a change in a spec. I think you're wandering off the discussion at hand - and going in circles.
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-snip-

Actually- the OP [Sam] asked how come his guy wanted $750 for a job he didn't think should cost that much. He asked- but hasn't returned so we don't know if they were administrative fees or not.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I appreciate the correction Jim. Had not really followed this thread from the original post, so I missed that.
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"Robatoy" wrote:
To elaborate on my comment to Lew...... A quote should already include a percentage for contingencies. A stain change.... a reputation is worth more than those few bucks you can maybe squeeze out of client. Industrial business is a different story. ------------------------------- My comments reflect my exposure to the industrial/government markets.
Resi is a different world.
Remember the $700 toilet deat?
Lew
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Smitty Two wrote:

That statement just begs for more explanation and insight.
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Smitty Two wrote:

To not charge extras even with industrial customers would seem to imply some good reason for that practive. Extras are a reality in the commercial world so it only seems likely there is a reason why you don't charge an extra dime to satisfy your industrial customers.
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Yo! Prosperity is legal and encouraged! How else could you send money to foreign aid?
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"Smitty Two" wrote:

What you lose on the apples you make up for on the oranges.
That's one way to run a business, just not mine. ---------------------------------

It also helps to insure survival.
Lew
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On 11/2/2010 12:10 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

In retail,they may use the term "loss leaders". That may be a bit of a stretch here, but not an insurmountable one.
Bill

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Smitty Two wrote:

I guess we would have to differ on what constitues greed, but it doesn't really matter - you should run your business as you see fit.
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A customer requested change is not a contingency item. It is an extra.
The OP is requesting a change, we have no idea what is involved in the change, but there is general agreement that a $750 charge for a couple of cabinets worth of changed stain is a "Whatchya talking about, Willis?!" Q&A session with the contractor.
To the OP, please post the contractor's explanation of the seemingly high charge when you get it.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

This might have already been said - and I confess I have not been really following this thread... I have experienced (too many times), when after a price and a scope of work has been agreed upon, the "can you just"'s start happening. You know - what is called scope creep. I've seen it in my professional life and I've seen it in my side jobs. The consumer is seldom aware of the real costs to this little extra and that little extra, since to their uneducated eye, it looks like a simple enough little add-on. After a fashion, you decide you don't want to deal with these things, so you come up with some sort of scheme that makes it more difficult for scope creep to happen. Adding prohibitive costs is certainly one very valid way of addressing this. What's amazing is that it's easy to see people who are on the receiving end of this complain about it, while at the same time, they will often be the advocate of it when they are speaking from the supplier's side of the story.
What people often forget is that it is not alway about the real work involved. It's often about the impact to schedules. A business will schedule work out in advance of the work at hand. Start adding extras to the work at hand and very quickly, you can't start the scheduled work behind it on time. Now you've got a problem. You have to make the problems pay for themselves.
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On a tangent...
Does anyone else have "I don't want this job" pricing? When I get someone or something which I foresee as having way too high a *PITA factor, I will often just set the price so high that I figure they'll either balk or if they accept it, I'm making so much it's worth it to put up with all the extra crap involved.
(*pain in the ass)
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It depends on what the project is. In a lot of situations it almost doesn't matter how much you'd charge as you're going to take a hit anyway. If you highball the estimate to make them go away, they'll whine to everybody they know that you're overpriced. If you highball them and they still go for it, they'll fight you every step of the way, make what should be enjoyable into a nightmare, and at the end they'll still bad mouth you to everyone they know.
Best thing to do is to politely beg out of giving them an estimate at all, citing job backlog, "our company isn't a good fit for your sort of project" or some such, and then refer them to your competition. ;)
R
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On 11/1/10 3:04 PM, RicodJour wrote:

That's usually my Plan A. In the specific cases which jogged my memory enough to bring up this scenario.... I was the competition who got referred. :-)
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Ouch! At least it means that the competition is looking to mess you up - that's a good thing. ;)
There must be PITA people that get passed around like that from contractor to contractor. I wonder what their cocktail party conversation's are like...
"I can't get a price from a single contractor in this town! They're all such pains! Why I could tell you stories about..." "...oh, look. They brought out some shrimp. I'll talk to you later! "
R
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On 11/1/10 5:17 PM, RicodJour wrote:

I use the term "competition" loosely, only because I'm not really in competition with anyone. I have the luxury, as a self-unemployed musician, of taking or leaving woodworking jobs.
What happens is that those cocktail party people to which you referred, are music producers and such and since I'm in those circles, people find out I do woodworking, too, so I get calls. Then they find out how anal.... um, meticulous... I am and get called again and referred. With the demand and meticulousness comes a hefty price tag, however. :-)
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't be fun listening to you operate a roofing nailer.....
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On 11/1/10 5:49 PM, Robatoy wrote:

Look man... sometimes I have to turn the radio off if the music's not "in time" with whatever woodworking activity I'm doing. Hammering or nail guns are pretty easy to subdivide into whatever time signature and tempo a song is in.
But hand sanding can get weird. :-)
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-MIKE-

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mmmmm weird you sayyyyy
Put on some hoofer music from an Astair movie. Throw some sand on the floor, and get your hands and feet shuffling away.. here's a good sanding song: (btw... you will never be able to hear this song again without thinking of this video....)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyXgTHvO1MA

For a lot of sanding there's always this one...( try to make it to the end..)
http://www.wimp.com/jumpinjive /
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