Compact Fluorescent light bulbs?

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I have not had luck... I keep wanting them to work so I keep trying them.. but none seem to last more than 6 months in my applications all over the house. Regular bulbs at my house also tend to have a very short life... may be flaky power supply (although I can think of no reason for that.. I live in a suburb, and have never known of any problems with our power supply) or my personal theory, my rough and tumble kids tend to literally shake the house when they roughhouse... so I am wondering if that leads to shortened lamp life (that may explain fillament, but would excessive vibration effect the CF bulbs?)
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Ask your local power company to check your voltage to see if it is higher than normal.
When I first moved into my present house, bulbs were burning out quite rapidly. The power company sent someone to check, and told me "no problem found". But strangely enough, from then on bulbs lasted a lot longer.
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Rich Greenberg Marietta, GA, USA richgr atsign panix.com + 1 770 321 6507
Eastern time. N6LRT I speak for myself & my dogs only. VM\'er since CP-67
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We have good luck on bulb life. One 26w/100w equivalent bulb in my office never gets turned off. The bulb currently in that fixture has been in continuous service for over 3 years.
Gideon
================ Jack wrote in message
I have not had luck... I keep wanting them to work so I keep trying them.. but none seem to last more than 6 months in my applications all over the house. Regular bulbs at my house also tend to have a very short life... may be flaky power supply (although I can think of no reason for that.. I live in a suburb, and have never known of any problems with our power supply) or my personal theory, my rough and tumble kids tend to literally shake the house when they roughhouse... so I am wondering if that leads to shortened lamp life (that may explain fillament, but would excessive vibration effect the CF bulbs?)
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On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 14:44:42 -0700, "Roger Taylor"

I got a couple at a surplus store for 2 dollars a piece. I think they were the previous generation.
Then two for a dollar each at a dollar store. Again, I think a previous generation.
They have a blue white light. I wouldn't use them by themselves, because I think the frequency range is too narrow. Of course I'm thinking of other fluorescent lights that, for example, make someone look ugly when that is the only light. Incandescent lights have a wide range of frequencies.
So I use one in a big room with an incandescnent light in the other fixture.

I found one that looks like a floodlight in the trash. The glass was broken, but I could just unscrew the whole cover and there was a regular coiled CF bulb underneath.
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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There is one other thing to be aware of. Equivalent CF bulbs are quite a bit longer than their incandescent equivalents. This makes them impractical for wall sconces, because the tip of the bulp pokes out through the top (or bottom) of the sconces. Other than that, they work well.
Call your electric company. The last time our power company had a sale on them, they cost a dollar apiece, and if you bought ten of a given wattage they tossed in two extras. I haven't tried any outside yet, but I'll give it a shot the next time a bulb goes. I did try one in a motion light once, and it flickered like a candle and never acheived full brightness.
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<SNIP>
In my experience, they work very well and are much improved compared to 3-5 years ago. Buy the "Energy Star" labeled versions. Those types have gone through an evaluation process to make sure that they meet life, light output and color standards.
Look at the lighting fixtures at www.lightingfortomorrow.com for some ideas about new lighting fixtures that are designed to use CFLs.
TKM
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<SNIP>
In my experience, they work very well and are much improved compared to 3-5 years ago. Buy the "Energy Star" labeled versions. Those types have gone through an evaluation process to make sure that they meet life, light output and color standards.
Look at the lighting fixtures at www.lightingfortomorrow.com for some ideas about new lighting fixtures that are designed to use CFLs.
TKM
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TKM wrote:

i found that topbulb.com has a nice supply and varieties, at least a year ago. they have a high kelvin rating for natural or white light(which i prefer, i do not like the yellow light).
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Interesting - but the designs can't use the screw-in CFLs (which are easy to find in stores) but must use pin-type CFLs which are a tad harder to find.
I guess they are trying to prevent folks from buying the fixtures and then screwing in a standard incandescent bulb.
Mike
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wrote:

That's right. If you install a light fixture designed only for CFLs, then it should not accept lamps with screw bases since then incandescent lamps could be substituted and the fixture may not be designed to safely take the higher heat.
Also, some electric utilities pay rebates for installing energy-efficient CFL fixtures. They typically won't rebate a fixture that can be retrofitted with incandescent bulbs.
Energy Star approved CFL fixtures require that the proper CFL lamp now be packed with the fixture. Maybe by the time that lamp burns out, (typically 10,000 hours) pin-base CFLs will be easier to find.
TKM
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I know that you can get almost any pin-type CFL (including some really bright ones like equivalent to 150W incandescent) at electrical suppliers (those that usually deal with contractors and large-building maintenance companies). But it's a lot easier to deal with the more common big-box reno stores.
It's about time that we can get fixtures specifically designed for CFLs. I've been annoyed for years that many standard fixtures don't fit the screw-in CFLs very well - they either assume the base is small close to the threaded part and don't clear the ballast or don't provide clearance for taller CFLs.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

I just replaced one of those "7-year" CFL bulbs (44W). It failed after only 18 months, but what the heck, I only paid $2 for it at one of HD's sidewalk sales. Out of curiosity, I pulled the base apart to see what the Chinese put into these things. There were eight, hand-soldered wires from the four tubes that ended on a round electronic ballast circuit board. The board has four coils/transformers, nine capacitors, a few resistors, and two transistors. All of the components were average quality, and I can see now why these ballasts fail at high temperatures. These parts were never intended for use at extreme temperatures, and even a little moisture from condensation would short something out if the lamp were started cold.
It would make sense to put more money into the quality of the ballast electronics and use pin-type, replaceable lamps instead of the throw-away crappola currently used in the screw-base CFL bulbs.
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Absolutely true, but a tad pricey if all you want is to replace the bulb in a lamp. If you are remodeling a house/room, doing it with pin type certainly makes sense.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

Another issue I see with the screw-in CFLs is the way heat is dissipated. As long as the bulb is above the base, heat from the ballast circuit board will rise up and away from the components. Mounted in any other position, heat will soak the circuit board and could cause to premature failure. The circuit board I took out had one, large electrolytic capacitor mounted on long leads to put it toward the base end of the lamp. These capacitors tend to dry out and become useless if they're exposed to heat, and that's probably why the Chinese tried to locate it away from the other components on the board. Overall, quite a kludge -- I'm surprised UL approves these things.
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I agree that fixtures should be more "CF friendly." But I should point out that we've had good luck with some "unfriendly" fixtures by purchasing socket extenders, which are very easy to find and rather inexpensive.
Gideon
================ Michael Daly wrote
It's about time that we can get fixtures specifically designed for CFLs. I've been annoyed for years that many standard fixtures don't fit the screw-in CFLs very well - they either assume the base is small close to the threaded part and don't clear the ballast or don't provide clearance for taller CFLs.
Mike
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the compact flourescents are measured in kelvin, where for example 2700K gives you the soft warm incandescent-like color. higher numbers give you the cool white. we now avoid the dollar store bulbs with premature burnout. the next step in our future will be LED's. right now the replacement bulbs are pricey and not really ready for the home market. i predict a big future for the 3 watt and 5 watt luxeon bulbs now in flashlights. oudoor seasonal lighting and hallways indoors: since last year we have been using 100 bulbs to the string use only one watt total LED christmas lights from a wholesale club at $9.99 a string of 100 in either christmas colors or white. yes that's only 1 watt of ac for 100 led bulbs, but they appear faint or out in daylight when used outdoors. the newer brighter style of a brighter LED in limited supply at walmart gives a more satisfying illumination for a few watts of ac per 100 bulbs. we are using the new white string at a shadowy outdoor entranceway for additional illumination to find the door key. search also for reading at http://www.energystar.gov/ we are looking forward to using this free software to convert and compare our electricity KWH to natural gas therms. http://www.joshmadison.com/software/convert /
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My first batch of CFLs lasted 10 years. Some bulbs are still going strong.
They used to be ridiculously expensive. Recently stocked up at Albertsons a 3 bulbs for $ 1.00 (26/100 Watts). Threw out all incandescents except a few to use with dimmers.
At the prices shown at servicelighting.com it would seemingly take a hundred years to see a measurable monetary benefit.
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Walter
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My TI solar calculator won't work with these bulbs. Wrong wavelength. So I use double fixtures, one incandescent, one CFL and the calculator works ok.
Bob

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You can get dimmable CFLs at many big box reno stores like Home Depot.
Mike
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What brand and what rated lumen output are you getting for $0.33 per bulb? Your cost is almost as inexpensive as incandescent bulbs purchased at four for a dollar.
Gideon
===================== Walter R. wrote
Recently stocked up at Albertsons a 3 bulbs for $ 1.00 (26/100 Watts). Threw out all incandescents except a few to use with dimmers.
At the prices shown at servicelighting.com it would seemingly take a hundred years to see a measurable monetary benefit.
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