Compact Flourescent "Lamps" for Ceiling Fan(s)

Page 2 of 2  

Go to HD and get the small spirals that ae equal to 60 watts.They fitin my schoolhouse fan light John Gilmer wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Gilmer wrote:

I think you'll find fluorescent bulbs are not a good replacement in ceiling fans and other places where the lights are on for short periods of time. From the Department of Energy's assessment of CF lights:
"Repeatedly switching a compact fluorescent light on and off reduces the life of the bulb. Therefore, compact fluorescent lights provide the biggest savings when they are used to replace incandescent lights that are used several hours per day." (http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/lighting/chap3.html)
Use CFs where you need to have a light on for long stretches, such as your living room, porch lights, etc., but not where there are short on-off cycles such as bathrooms, bedrooms, etc.
We put CF bulbs in the kitchen, bathroom and vestibule, and they burned out much faster than standard incandescent bulbs every single time. In the long run, that costs more and wastes more as you contribute faster to the landfill and manufacturing energy use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have 2 of those fans (those with the small light globes). One is used occasionally, for short periods of time. It has an incandescent (smaller, called "ceiling fan bulb"). The other one is used for several hours a day, and has the CF I posted about earlier.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Jan 2007 07:20:27 -0500, "John Gilmer"

Some ideas that I might think about:
1. Replace the light kit of the fan with a bigger one. 2. Replace the globe for a bigger one. 3. Operate without a globe. 4. Get the 'full spectrem' CF bulbs, they look brighter for the same wattage.
Just some guesses,
tom @ www.Japanese-Beetles.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@here.com says...

1. Is there an issue (heat or otherwise) mounting a CF upside down? 2. Are they suitable in a high vibration application, such as this?
I put a CF in mine, just checking before I shut it all up again It's over the stairs and a PITA to get to).
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There's no problem using CFLs either base up or base down and vibration shouldn't be an issue either (unlike most incandescents).
Cheers, Paul

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 13 Jan 2007 03:37:20 GMT, Paul M. Eldridge

Some CF bulbs have warnings against 'fully enclosed indoor use'. Not really sure what this REALLY means, since I used some inside globes and they have small vent holes in the base. I wonder if this means like air-tight.
Follow the directions, I think even some CF bulbs are marketed for ceiling fans too.
later,
tom @ www.BlankHelp.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Tom,
Practically speaking, I don't imagine there would be a problem using just about any 13 to 15-watt CFL (60-watt equivalent) in this type of application.
The Philips Marathon Universal (available at Home Depot) has an operating range of -30C through to +60C (-22F to +140F). Although we're told "use in recessed cans or totally enclosed indoor fixtures could result in reduced lamp life", the accompanying comparison chart shows this lamp is compatible with "surface mount" fixtures; the representative picture, in this case, is of a marine-style fixture with a fully enclosed, air-tight lens. You'll have to draw your own conclusions.
See: http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/can/ecatalog/cfl/pdf/p-3754.pdf
Please note the data sheet should read 60C, NOT 60F.
Cheers, Paul
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom The Great wrote:

i believe the heat build up is reason they do not want them inclosed. i believe the cfs can't stand the heat as reg bulbs do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

True, there are electronics in the CF bulb, just wondering what is 'enclosed'? Air tight? Are globe with small vent holes ok?
tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Tom,
Heat build up shouldn't be a problem if there are ventilation holes and the CFL is in the range of 13 to 15-watts. If you're curious and have one of those electronic indoor/outdoor thermometers, you could stick the outdoor probe inside the globe and monitor its temperature over a two to three hour period. If it remains below 40C (104F), you should be fine. If it runs a little higher than this, the Philips Marathon Universal is rated for temperatures up to 60C (140F).
Cheers, Paul
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom The Great wrote:

tom try topbulb.com they have some good info and that is where i get mine. i pay more for the 26 watt 6400k bulbs. i like white light not yellow, which is 2700k.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.