Colored Electrical Outlets

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wrote:

true any more) meaning the "U" ground was not connected to the mounting tab.
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Many building have three types of circuits. Commercial: Same old stuff you got at your house. Essential: These are backed up by generator. Critical: These are backed up by both a generator and an Uninterruptable Power Supply similar to the battery backup you may have for your PC. The critical circuits are marked so people will not know not to plug things into them they shouldn't like blow dryers, personal heaters, and janitorial equipment. Also it lets them know you could plug in a heart-lung machine there. There may also be rules about what you can use on essential circuits so they may also be marked.
Jimmie
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Colored-Electrical-Outlets-389158-.htm elecwired wrote:
William Munny wrote:

------------------------------------- The color is the grade type (heavy duty, ect)
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On 9/21/2010 11:35 AM, elecwired wrote:

red or orange indicates that the outlet is on the UPS system (aka back-up battery/generator system), so it will still keep working when the lights go out. So that is where you want to plug the ventilator and such into.
The shape of the slots indicates the 'heavy duty' outlets. The little side leg on one slot means 30amp, IIRC, but it goes both ways, and normal stuff can also be plugged into there. Numerous web sites have diagrams, if you are curious enough to Google them.
--
aem sends...

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outlet's electrical charicteristics, like voltage, amperage, phase. There are numerous types and shapes of 30 amp outlets, as well as outlets of every other amperage
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Furthermore, color of the outlet in computer centers and other locations can indicate isolated ground - a design the reduces surge impact on sensitive devices.
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separate insulated ground that goes directly to the panel instead of being grounded to all the other grounds and metal boxes and conduit along the way like the normal ground. Causes less electric "noise" in that particular ground for some electronics that might be sensitive to it.
Red IS emergency backup power (UPS connected)
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Yellow is corrosion resistance contacts.
Green dot on the face is Hospital Grade.
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On 9/21/2010 10:53 PM, Keith S. wrote:

Per the wikipedia article (FWIW, of course): Color code
The color of a device does not identify the voltage class or power system for the device. Since the colors are not regulated by national standards, the purpose of color-coding a receptacle is set by the building owner. Brown, ivory, white, almond, grey, and black receptacles in the 515 configuration are selected to blend with the decor of a room.
* Blue receptacles may indicate built-in surge suppressors. * A red receptacle may indicate a special-service outlet such as one connected to an emergency standby power source. * At least one manufacturer makes a yellow receptacle which identifies it as corrosion-resistant. * A receptacle with a green dot is a so-called hospital grade device; such devices are tested to survive harder use than wiring devices intended for residential or commercial purposes. The NEMA standard does not define green as a color for wiring devices.
A receptacle with an orange triangle is an isolated ground device, where the grounding pin of the receptacle is connected to ground independently of the frame of the receptacle and wiring outlet box. The receptacle itself may be any color, but contrary to popular belief, a receptacle is no longer an isolated ground device because the receptacle itself is orange, although this was formerly the case in the United States.[14]
-- aem sends...
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On 9/21/2010 10:55 AM, aemeijers wrote:

The orange outlets indicate that they are isolated ground, the ground circuit is not bonded to the mounting ears. They are specified for data processing equipment to keep from sharing the ground circuit with possible sources of electrical noise. Red outlets typically indicate that they're hooked to an emergency power source that will continue if the main power goes out. You usually see red outlets in hospital rooms and this is what things like respirators/ventilators will be plugged into.
TDD
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 23:21:08 -0500, The Daring Dufas

IBM figured out in the early 80s that this isolated ground boondoggle was snake oil and they stopped including IG in the specs for their equipment. There are some self proclaimed "experts" who still cling to this fantasy but it is finally dying the death it deserves.
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On 9/22/2010 11:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A lot of older equipment was susceptible to electrical line noise. Heck, the first personal computers I worked on back in the late 70's and early 80's would conk out due to the static electric charge from you touching the case after you walked on carpet. I'll use the isolated ground receptacles in commercial situations where there a lot of motors and refrigeration/AC compressors on the same power system.
TDD
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 05:11:26 -0500, The Daring Dufas

IG will do nothing to stop an ESD hit through the case. The real "PCs were very noise tolerant and by the time IBM came out with the PS/2 they were using a multi layer board that didn't even need external shielding. I made several of them with wooden cases
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/woody.jpg
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 11:10:56 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

radiate RF all across the spectrum.
Computers using the old linear power supplies were VERY sensitive to line noise - which made isolated ground power circuits almost a requirement in many applications.
Switch mode power supplies of today are extremely noise tollerant - but a very large majority of them are also extremely noizy - with little or no EMI filtering to stop the hash from the chopper circuit from radiating back into the power supply, along with the associated harmonics.
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 21:34:40 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That was what I was told but we did do some rudimentary testing with a field strength meter and this was not noisy at all. It was certainly meet FCC class A spec.

What PC used a linear supply? The first PC-1 5150 used a switcher supply and every one after that did too, Virtually every linear supply I ever saw at IMB was ferro resonant and very noise tolerant.

They are all required to have a line filter to keep this out of the power cord. None of this has anything to do with IG. IG is intended to keep noise off the EGC
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On Sep 24, 12:13am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not surprising, since the class-A spec is 10dB below class-B. If they passed class-B as an indivicual board (with the 6dB allowance for the case), they'll pass class-A without a case with at least a 4dB margin.

Computers (before PCs) once did use a lot of linear supplies and T-R packs.

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On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 01:13:25 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I can categorically deny that as being even remotely possible, having been in the computer manufacturung business for 5 years, and having had numerous designs tested for FCC and DOT compliance. A full foil lining on the wood case, at a very minimum, would be required to pass.

I didn't say PC. I said computer. I've got several linear computer power supplies stashed away in the "way back" box., as well as 2 operating 6809 boxes with linear power supplies.

"Required" and "have" are at least 3 different things it appears. A very LARGE percentage of low end PC power supplies have NO EMI filtering on the line input. Noise in the power cord WILL end up on the ground, to one extent or another - and an IG keeps it more or less localized to that circuit.
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On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 13:12:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I started in the computer biz in 1966
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On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 14:17:50 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

back too. Not quite as far as you though!!!! I got out of the manufacturing business many years ago - just before the manufacturer went "T.U."
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On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 13:12:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

QRZ, I suppose, too.

You're *clearly* wrong. Computer components must pass *without* a case (with a 6dB exemption). A component designed for class-B will *easily* pass class-A limits without a problem.

No, they're required to pass the test. That's made a lot easier with the line filter, but the filter is not a requirement.

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