Color-specific primers

I've been hearing lately that certain colors should have certain _other_ colors as their primer. For example, I've heard a grey-tinted primer makes blue finish paint more vibrant. Is that just the paint companies trying to sell more product? I'm repainting a bedroom with sound, clean walls and wasn't going to prime but if I decide to prime, and if the colored primers make a different, I might as well use them. Any thoughts or experience to share?
Chris
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Chris wrote:

On the paint color chip it will be indicated whether a tinted primer is recommended for a particular color. My experience is with Benjamin Moore; they use a little symbol, like a triangle or a dot or something. Otherwise I guess they assume you'll use a white or neutral primer.
The only time I've encountered it was with a deep rich red, and I was very surprised to find the primer tinted a distinct medium yellow. I figured it was a mistake but the dealer assured me it was as intended. The yellow adds an undertone or something that gives the finish coat just the exact color that's intended. For sure the final result would have been kinda the same without it, but not precisely as intended.
If you're springing for high-end paint, you might as well follow their instructions.
Chip C
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Auto painters have used different primers for different reasons for 50 years that I know of.
It is also possible to tint primers for typical use in home painting.
Results will vary with different types of paint. Lacquer is going to be different than latex wall paint in that regard.
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Think about it...
1. The purpose of paint is to add an *opaque* covering of a particular color to an obkect.
2. Being opaque, undercolor won't show through unless the surface isn't thoroughly covered.
3. If the surface isn't thoroughly covered it is because you either applied the paint too thinly, you need another coat or the paint is junk.
IMO, it is much easier to paint a surface that is markedly different in color from the paint being applied...makes it easier to see what you are doing.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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Chris wrote:

Tinted primers are generally tinted the same color as the paint that will be used. I can't think of a reason for using a different color, unless it would be to cover an underlying color that contrasts strongly with the topcoat (orange over blue, etc).
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Many posts have asserted primer is CLOSE to final color but lighter to enable differentiating painted for unpainted surfaces.
wrote:

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