Cold room construction

I would like to put the drywall and tiles into cold room , will thy drywall/tiles crack because of the low temperature or condensed water happens ?
Thanks,
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Never tile over drywall. It's not durable and not water resistant. Use concrete board or backer panels. And use thinset mortar rather than tile mastic. That will give you a mortar wall that should hold up, and except for the hassle of cutting concrete board it's not any more work.
|I would like to put the drywall and tiles into cold room , | will thy drywall/tiles crack because of the low temperature | or condensed water happens ? | | Thanks,
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On Wednesday, 26 November 2014 10:05:58 UTC-5, Mayayana wrote:

Thanks for the reply, my original question is not clear I am not putting the tile over the drywall
currently, the cold room only has concrete
I want to put the drywall on the wall and tile on floor,
I wonder does it has any problem the cold room does not has any insulation
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| currently, the cold room only has concrete | I want to put the drywall on the wall | and tile on floor, | | I wonder does it has any problem | the cold room does not has any insulation
If you'll never heat it that should be OK. But I don't see why you'd want to put up stud walls in a room that will never be finished as a living space. If it might end up being heated, assuming there's no water leaking through the concrete, you can put fiberglass insulation in the stud wall, then staple plastic over it all before the drywall goes up.
It's hard to know the best approach without knowing the room. If it's damp I'd avoid any of what you're considering.
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On Wednesday, 26 November 2014 14:20:39 UTC-5, Mayayana wrote:

we want to keep the cold room clean and cold the room is still using for storage (fruit / can / etc .. ) The heat will not get into cold room
we already paint the floor, however it seems dusty awhile maybe that is coming concrete dust from the wall.
should we paint the wall , will that help to keep dust away ?
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| we want to keep the cold room clean and cold | the room is still using for storage (fruit / can / etc .. ) | The heat will not get into cold room | | we already paint the floor, however it seems dusty awhile | maybe that is coming concrete dust from the wall. | | should we paint the wall , will that help to keep dust away ? |
That sounds good to me. There used to be a product called Emulsa-Bond. I don't know if it's still around. EB is an additive for latex paint that adds an oil to make it soak in better. I've used latex paint with EB and water to paint things like dusty cellar floors that are too rough fully clean. Adding water makes it like a whitewash, but it still seals like paint. Something like that should seal the surface without peeling, in case the walls/floor get damp. If you want to you could then paint glossy latex over that, but if the walls get damp it's better not to use anything with a film that could peel.
Tiling the floor would be a lot of work and you'd need to probably pour a sandmix bed. The painted concrete wouldn't be a good surface for tile mastic or thinset mortar to stick to.
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On 11/26/2014 4:10 PM, Mayayana wrote:

What if they are vinyl tiles? With the self stick back?
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| > Tiling the floor would be a lot of work and you'd | > need to probably pour a sandmix bed. The painted | > concrete wouldn't be a good surface for tile | > mastic or thinset mortar to stick to.
| What if they are vinyl tiles? With the self stick back?
Over painted concrete? I doubt they'd even stick. For that I'd want to put down plywood first. But the OP seems to be saying it's sometimes damp. For that I would only consider ceramic/mortar if it *had* to be tiled. If it's the way I'm imaging it I might be inclined to just set down a vinyl runner mat, without glue.
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Not enough info. Tell us about this cold room. How big? How will it be cooled? Where in the building is it? What's it made out of? How cold will it be? Et c.
Dave M.
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On Thursday, November 27, 2014 8:49:18 AM UTC-5, Davd L. Martel wrote:

+1 Not much info. But from what I've heard so far, I agree with M that if it's just used for storage, a simpler solution would seem to be to paint the concrete floor and walls and leave it at that.
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Maybe. He can put down three or four and see how they do.
(My friend put self-stick where the kitchen was on the original wood floor of a loft in Soho that had been used for decades by a printing company. That only stuck for a few months, but the paint is new and can be washed clean before putting the tile down.
OP you might also consider outdoor carpeting, like is used for balconies. I don't know what happens if you leave heavy things on it for months, but if you leave the things forever, it won't matter what happens to the nap underneath.
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| >What if they are vinyl tiles? With the self stick back? | | Maybe. He can put down three or four and see how they do. |
Self-stick adhesive is very thin. It needs to be stuck down to a clean, smooth surface. On most, perhaps all, concrete it would only be sticking to the "peaks". If I *had to* do it for some reason I'd use tile mastic with vinyl composite tiles. (Think hospital floors.) But even then it would be a bad idea to glue it over paint.
Another issue with self-stick is variability of quality: The designs are nearly all cheap and kitschy, the plastic often discolors and/or peels. A few years ago I did a job with Armstrong tile from HD. I think it was "Solarium". Cheaper than something like solid vinyl tile, but not the cheapest level of self-stick. The mastic was sort of gooey, but I didn't give it much thought. I figured it must be a reformulation. It turned out the mastic was faulty. It remained gooey and the tiles didn't stick. I was lucky in that the job was in a rental and the building owner is a very old customer. Everyone was happy with just putting carpet over the mess. But it could have been a big loss for me if the customer had demanded a refund or a suitable tile floor. If I were lucky, Armstrong might have refunded the tile cost, but I would have still been out for the labor and the underlayment.
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In typed:

If you are attaching drywall to studs, I would probably want to put in fiberglass insulation in the stud bays first anyway, even if you think the room will never be heated. That would still help keep the cold room cold and separate it from the temperatures of whatever is on the other side of the walls. Plus, if you or anyone else ever did want to change the use of the room, the insulation would already be in place behind the drywall.
And, yes, paint the drywall and the floor to help keep things clean, protected, and more dust free.
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