Coined a new word today

MacGizmo. n: tool not currently in one's possession.
Usage: Typically after one has gone to the work area, and found that instead of the tool on hand, another is needed. "the other macgizmo".
Example: After climbing up the ladder, and realizing that a tool, still on the ground is needed, "I guess I need the other MacGizmo" is uttered before the trip to get it.
Alternate spelling: MacGizzer.
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HAHAHHA
Too late, about 80 years
My grandfather use to use that word
Sorry

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Sadly, there reallis is a new word:
"McJob"...
SPRINGFIELD, Massachusetts (AP) -- McDonald's may not like it, but the editors of the Merriam-Webster dictionary say "McJob" is a word that's here to stay.
DICTIONARY DEFINITION
McJob (mek jäb') n.
The 11th edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, published in June, defines a "McJob" as "a low-paying job that requires little skill and provides little opportunity for advancement."
The fast-food giant's chief executive, Jim Cantalupo, called the definition a "slap in the face" to the 12 million people who work in the restaurant industry, and demanded that Merriam-Webster dish up something more flattering.
But the dictionary publisher said Tuesday that it "stands by the accuracy and appropriateness" of its definition.
"For more that 17 years 'McJob' has been used as we are defining it in a broad range of publications," the company said, citing everything from The New York Times and Rolling Stone to newspapers in South Africa and Australia.
With more than 55 million copies sold since 1898, Merriam-Webster's Collegiate claims to be the best-selling hardcover dictionary on the market.
"Words qualify for inclusion in the dictionary because they are widely and commonly used in a broad range of carefully edited sources," said Arthur Bicknell, a spokesman for the Springfield-based publisher.
"McJob" is similarly defined in the American Heritage Dictionary, the Oxford English Dictionary and Webster's Dictionary, published by Random House.
The OED definition, which cites a 1986 story in The Washington Post, is: "An unstimulating, low-paid job with few prospects, esp. one created by the expansion of the service sector."
http://www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/books/11/11/offbeat.mcjob.ap /
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote:

No this is skilled work, out of the MacGyver did with so little. <G>
The current task is plumbing, which involves a lot of trips between the work bench and the task area (behind the furnace and above the sump pump).
3-4 days of remodeling 50 yr old plumbing, gives me a lot of respect for the plumbing trade.
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One of my favorites is "fritzulated". If something is extremely fritzulated, it can be "megafritzulated".
an example is that the customer's furnace is "fritzulated" when it's not blowing heat, and the house is cold. After the customer works on it himself, it is then "megafritzulated".
--

Christopher A. Young
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I hate it when my "foizer" is "fritzulated".
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Or, you get there only to find the thing's half-discombobulated...

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