Coffeemaker just steams- the fix

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This is one of those 'so simple I can't believe I didn't think of it myself' stories.
Wife picked up a Mr. Coffee at a thrift shop- tried to run a pot of coffee through it and it just spit and sputtered for 1/2 hour and the 12 cups we put in dropped 2 cups into the pot. The rest was steam.
It was a nice looking pot, so I tried cleaning it-- then dismantled it. I didn't see anything obvious- so I Googled and found this page- http://nepacrossroads.com/about18852.html
I already had the bottom off, so in less than 5 minutes, I popped off the rubber hose with the check valve in it- blew the wad of paper out of the check valve- and reassembled.
Works perfect now.
I wonder how many pots I've tossed that could have been fixed so easily.
Jim
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wrote:

Jim, you remind me of a funny story a few days ago. I also had a cheap coffee maker not dripping right even tho I ran vinegar thru it. I was ready to toss it but my wife said let me clean it. Guess what, now it works fine as before. I also think it had to do with the check valve for the water going into the pot. I was humbled.
I guess we both did good <g>
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-snip-

Well, the good news is- you have a working coffee pot. OTOH, for the rest of your life you'll be hearing- 'I could have fixed that. . . Remember the time. . . "<G>
Jim
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wrote:

Boy are you right. Wife has a memory like an elephant when it comes to stuff like this. :-(
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wrote:

Plainly the problem was the use of paper cups for coffee. Res ipsa loquitur. You should try using styrofoam cups and see if it clogs again with styrofoam.

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just steams- the fix:

Well done.
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Thread Hijack Alert!
Does any one know of a reasonably priced coffee maker that can be plumbed into the house water system?
I'm not looking for a single serving Keurig type nor am I looking to spend high 3 to low 4 digits for an auto-fill coffee maker. Something under $150 would be nice but I just can't seem to find one in that price range.
Of course, it has to have the rest of the desirable features: Programmable, auto-off, correct brewing temp, decent holding temp, etc.
I tossed my B&D Saver Saver coffee maker last week. It never kept the coffee hot enough, it was impossible to fill without spilling water on the counter and it dripped even more water on the counter while brewing. It's called a "space saver" because it hung from the bottom of the upper cabinets. The ironic part was that you couldn't put anything under it - except a towel - because it dripped constantly. The final straw was when they recalled the carafe (send the old one in, wait 10 days for a "safer" one) and the new one added a new leakage point between the glass and the plastic top. Now it drips when you fill the coffee maker, it drips while it's brewing, and it drips when you are pouring yourself a cup of joe. Well, actually, it doesn't leak anymore unless someone at the landfill is using it.
Currently, we're using our spare coffee maker, which I like (an older Gevalia thermal carafe type) but I'd like to put that back on the shelf as a spare and get a new, larger capacity one that I can plumb so I don't have to fill it each time. Any ideas?
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So, when 19 Muslim males between age 18 and 35 threaten the stews with box cutters, that's plane drift?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote: -snip-

Let's call it thread *drift*.<g>
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On 11/07/2012 01:35 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yeah, go to a place that sells used restaurant equipment and get an old Bunn unit.

Picky, picky!
Jon
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"Used supply? I'd like to check out your old Bunns, and maybe see them up close? Yeah, I want to get hooked up, and I want it hot and fresh."
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 11/07/2012 01:35 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yeah, go to a place that sells used restaurant equipment and get an old Bunn unit.
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On Wed, 7 Nov 2012 13:35:32 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Not for a plumbed coffee maker. Too extreme for me. You might look for a maker with a removable tank. Takes away the water pouring part. I had an under cabinet B&D with a tank. Very good, never leaked. Easy to fill at the sink. The thermal carafe was crap though, and that's why I finally tossed after about 5 years. They don't make that model any more. You're on you own I think. And it seems half the brands I've had have had a poorly formed spout on the carafe, and drip. The rummage store Mr Coffee we use now might be the best we've had. Big opening to pour water and a good spout on the carafe.
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On 11/07/12 9:16 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

The B&D I just tossed has a removable tank. Unfortunately is was a bad design - long and flat. When you filled it for 10 - 12 cups, the water sloshed out of the large fill hole when you inserted the tank into the machine. The water then dripped out the sides of the tank holder onto the counter.
http://infiniteelectronix.com/images/products/blackndecker/SDC740B.jpg
> The thermal carafe was crap though, and that's why I finally tossed > after about 5 years. They don't make that model any more. > You're on you own I think. And it seems half the brands I've had have > had a poorly formed spout on the carafe, and drip.
The original carafe was fine. No drips. Then we got a recall notice about the danger of the handle falling off and traded it in. The new carafe leaked from the seam between the plastic rim and the glass. You could actually lift the plastic rim up a bit. Don't know if it's supposed the glued on or just tightly form fitted, but the new (safer) carafe was not water tight between the glass and the plastic rim.
The other PITA thing with that coffee maker was that the buttons for setting the clock and programming the unit were backwards. Minutes on the left, hours on the right. What were they thinking?
Oh yeah, it never kept the coffee hot enough for us either.

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wrote:

Yeah, you can tell by looking it's not a good tank design for transport/insertion. Mine was tall,deep, and narrow. Easy to hold, no sloshing, easy insert, and never leaked. Of course it didn't really "save space" with everything hanging down far enough that a toaster or something would slide under it. More like a fixed object getting in the way. Wife wanted it.
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My previous "space maker" was probably just like yours with a square tank. I forget why I replaced it, but it was old and something went bad on it that I couldn't fix. The replacement was the style I recently tossed and at first I thought the resulting extra space under the tank would be nice. Unfortunately, with all the dripping, the only thing we kept underneath it was a cloth placemat to absorb the water.
I like the Gevalia with the thermal carafe that we're using now (we got it free many years ago with a order of coffee) but it only does 8 cups. It makes good coffee and the thermal carafe keeps it fresh, but it doesn't have a timer. I also want to keep it as a spare and as a "travel pot" when we go cabin camping, etc.
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On Wed, 7 Nov 2012 13:35:32 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Look for a Bunn commercial model. A-10 is about $325 or so.
Not plumbed in, but my wife would not part with our Technivorm Moccamaster for good coffee. She never has spills with a good pouring container. It has a wide receptacle for the water.
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On Thu, 8 Nov 2012 00:09:24 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Our pot makes coffee in 6 minutes. You flip the switch, take a leak, put your socks on and the coffee is ready.
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Speed is not an advantage when making coffee. If the water is not in contact with the grounds long enough, you won't get as much flavor. Water temp, filter shape, grounds size, brew time, etc. all have an impact on the quality of my favorite beverage.
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On 11/07/2012 08:33 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That's why I make my coffee manually, by adding grounds to a pot of water taken off of the stove just after it comes to a boil.
They (the grounds) sit in that water while I dither for a few minutes, then it all gets filtered *quickly* through a gold filter.
It does take a bit more work than a coffee make, I will admit, but the result is something you cannot achieve with a machine.
Jon
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On Thu, 08 Nov 2012 02:16:49 -0800, Jon Danniken

This almost sounds like the old Perculator method of making coffee.
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Actually, Jon's method is closer to the French Press method than percolated (not perc-u-lated) coffee.
Percolated coffee still uses a basket and strainer, sort of like a drip coffee maker, but the difference is that a drip maker drips plain water through the grounds while a percolator drips (recycles?) coffee through the grounds as it boils up through the stem.
A French Press forces water through the grounds with no filter used. See here:
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Beverage/FrenchPress.htm
Both Jon's method and the French Press method is known as "steeped" coffee. Jon filters his grounds out, while a French Press simply pushes them to the bottom of the pot.
See here for more ways to make coffee:
http://www.coffeeteawarehouse.com/coffee-brew.html
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