Code question - conduit from weatherhead to meter

Hey folks,
I'm upgrading my house (in Los Angeles) to 200A service and I am trying to find out some info on code requirements for the conduit run from the weatherhead to the meter main.
The city requires me to put the new meter on the back of the house. The easiest way to hook up the service drop is a straight 2" GS conduit going up the outside wall but, as this is a 2 story house, I think this will look really ugly (even if I paint it). I would prefer not opening up a wall to run the conduit so I thought that, maybe, we could run the conduit down the side of the house (which is out of sight), use a right angle 2" GS conduit bend to bring it horizontal and then use an LB to go around the corner to the back of the house and run GS into the side of the meter main. The distance from the meter to the corner of the house is about 3' and the distance from the corner to where the vertical conduit would be is about 2-3'. The horizontal run of conduit would be something like 3-4' off the ground.
I know that I need approval from both the city's DWP and the building inspector (in L.A. these are separate agencies) and I'm waiting for a return call from the DWP.
I tried to get hold of a building inspector to ask if this was OK and, after some effort, did manage to speak to one very briefly. He told me that the horizontal run needs to be incased in concrete, then said he had others to help and hung up on me. I don't understand this requirement. I have looked at the city's DWP Electric Service Requirements and it only mentions concrete encasement in underground runs. I'm trying to understand this requirement but have not been able to find anything online. Maybe the inspector thought I would be running the horizontal run underground? Can anyone give me some insight into this? A website or code section cite would be great.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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**He is the one who must ultimately interpret the local code. I would be concerned about the distance the service head is from the utility companies wires. There is probably a maximum distance the head can be from the point of attachment. Call the guy back and get clarification. It does sound like he misunderstood your intent
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*I agree with RBM. It doesn't sound as though concrete encasement is called for, but Los Angeles has their own electrical code. I think the best thing would be for you to take a photo of your house with the electrical service path drawn onto the photo and bring it down to show an electrical inspector. You could also consult with an electrical contractor.
I know one power company here in NJ frowns upon having an LB condulet before the meter. They are afraid that someone could open the LB and tap into the power before it gets metered.
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I think this is going to be an uphill battle for you. I'd take some good pictures. Upload them and then draw my proposed conduit on them using a picture editing tool. "Paint" will do. Then take a trip downtoem to visit the inspector. CAll first and find out when they are in the office and if an appointment is possible. Most have regular office hours in the mornings before they go out for the day. Once you get past them you still have to conveince the power company it's ok. That will be easier if you have the local building authority sold.
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** The picture of 3- 2/0 bugs in a 2" condulet ain't a pretty one (lol)

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It sounds like a cheap homeowner who doesn't want to pay what it costs to do an underground feed...
Its funny how people think that conduits and pipes for utility services are like tinker toys and "oh just move that out of where it can be seen, you can do that with those 90 elbow fitting things, can't you" when they have no clue of pull-points and how much more difficult it becomes to do such things...
~~ Evan
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I'm curious as to how you arrived at that. Have you seen the installation, the poll location, and availability of underground feed? You're not one of those guys that thinks every house is built like theirs are you?
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Because the owner in question has asked how to make a conduit necessary for his upgraded electrical service disappear by means of stupidly complex methods when the alternative to NOT see it is to have it buried, but trenching, installing underground conduit, protecting the underground conduit, backfilling and then pulling the conductors costs a lot more than "hiding" the conduit around the corner...
Asking for a "pie-in-the-sky" stupid solution over one that would look MUCH better but is more expensive can ONLY be explained by the owner being too cheap to do it right...
That is why I told him to get over himself and let the electrician install the straight pipe from the weatherhead to the meter can...
~~ Evan
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wrote

The solution may be stupid to an informed person, but not always to a homeowner ignorant of power feeds. Not every location allows for underground installation. He may not have that option It may be more than just trenching from a pole, but may include a right of way across many feet of concrete, across a highway, or who knows what. You look foolish making accusations with no facts, but you are entitles to an opinion. .
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I had a friend who fixated over never drilling a hole in his home, keeping it pristine, never do anything.
Thats not a uncommon desire even though lots of holes are made during construction, the outside has windows, gutters downspouts, power phone and cable......
yet someone would go postal not wanting a dish anywhere on their home. Years ago I installed dish tv for awhile.
The OP might get away by putting a main disconnect as early as possible before the line runs around the house
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It's also funny when a person on the internet attempts to foist their aesthetic opinion on a homeowner, site and sight unseen. And it's funny when a person on the internet reads all sorts of shit into a post and then pronounces all kinds of "facts" about the situation.
I agree with your assessment that someone needs to get over themselves, just not with your conclusion as to who that party is.
R
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He umm has the option of NOT upgrading his service if it is too expensive to do it correctly OR he can't get over the required visual appearance changes to his house...
But "I don't like how the conduit looks" has to be the top bullcrap reason of all time to decide not to go through with some sort of improvement to the house which would allow for a better electrical service...
~~ Evan
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Kup-L-Taps, the power thief's friend You only need one, they don't meter the neutral ;-)
http://www.electricnet.com/product.mvc/KUP-L-Tap-0002
That is why they have the "no access" rule.
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I think you are going and busting your own balls over a matter of aesthetics modifying a rather simple straight pipe from the weatherhead to the meter socket box because you don't like the look of it...
Wow...
It is a pipe... Paint it... Get over yourself and let your electrician do it the easy way... Do you really want to have to submit plans and have to wait for them to be approved ?
I haven't ever seen a service entry pipe buried inside the wall of a house before... Maybe that is an LA thing but seems like a lot of B.S. to go through... If you don't like wires and pipes coming in from above, ask the electric company if it is possible to do an underground service feeder and then you would only see a few feet of pipe coming up out of the ground feeding into the meter box...
~~ Evan
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John wrote:

Consider the solution to esthetic mistakes often used by architects:
Ivy.
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Thought I would post a single reply to all the responses to my orginal post.
Frist off, thanks to all who took the time to respond. Appreciate your time and effort. I spoke with DWP again and the service rep offered to come out and look things over again. After going through some options, he will allow me to move the meter and riser to a better location; one out of sight from the backyard. Still have to play with the riser a bit, but everyone's happy (well, maybe not Evan ;->).
As to Evan's comments.....
Much amused at what was the grandest display of "Ignorant Buffoonery" I've seen in a long time. Rather than bother to reply to each of his comments individually, let me summarize.
The city will not approve an underground feed. If you had bothered to ask rather than rant, you might have found that out. But ranting on without knowing the facts is one of the signs of "IB."
You comment about the hassle of plans and approvals. If you had read (and understood) my original post you would have been able to figure out that everything is being done to code, with permits and inspections. After all, I mentioned "code" and "inspectors" and "DWP" in my post. Permits/inspections are already factored in. Lacking in reading comprehension isn't itself a sin. However when you not only demonstrate but wallow proudly in your ignorance you make a total fool of yourself and, again, assume the mantle of "IB."
You discount the homeowner's desire to achieve their aesthetic vision and say to just let the electrician do it the "easy way." All I can say is "Wow!" Maybe you've never owned your own home. Or maybe you simply don't have any pride in workmanship. Contrary to what you may think, I pay those who work for me quite well and, in return, I expect them to produce very high quality results. I would never just tell people to do what is easy whatever the results; but I guess you would. "IB" yet again.
Finally without even trying to understand the situation, you presented the false dicothomy of either "bury the cable" or "don't upgrade the service." You seem to be incapable of understanding that your limited knowledge and perception may not allow for solutions beyond the immediately obvious. Can I get an "IB" from the congregation?
I could go on but I think that everyone who has read my original post and your comments can come to their own conclusions. But, honestly, I haven't seen anyone embarrass themselves as much as you have done here in a very long time.
To everyone else, once again thank you all for your comments. The meter and riser will go where I want, LADWP was a pleasure to work with, and everyone (who matters) is happy.
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