Cobra Ridge Vents vs. Turbines

Which is better- Cobra ridge vents or simple turbines?
The home is 2500 sq.ft. one story shingle in South Florida, and now has no roof vents- only current venting is in the soffits.
In Googling around I see as many negative Cobra ridge vent comments as I see positive ones- mostly citing water intrusion during windy rain. This is South Florida- of course we have windy rain.
How is a person to know which option to choose? The reroof itself is coming in around $5K, with Cobra vents an additional $600- even then they want to add another $500 for a super GAF warranty. How much of this is necessary and how much is hype?
Company under consideration is http://allamericanroofingonline.com .
Any and all comments welcome.
--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com
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Correction http://www.allamericanroofingonline.com
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My parents house has turbine vents. They are noisy, rather ugly, and may leak. My house has ridge vents--no problems after 14 years. Personally I would not buy a warranty, it should be included with the product, if it's any good.
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I would like to know HOW is it that in Florida, a Right to work State where a roofer MIGHT see 12 bucks an hour off the books, a new roof on a 2500 SF house is going to run 5000.00, while here in Long Island NY, where roofers get more than 40.00 an hour, a new roof and full tearoff with 66' of new ridge vent cut in AND 4 new plywood sheets costs all of 2900.00???
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On 19 Nov 2003 22:54:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote:

Insurance is very expensive when you put those 85 year old Florida workers up on the roof. That adds a lot of cost to the job.
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That is indeed a very good question!!! I had a roof replaced 6 months ago, in the Tampa Bay area at a cost of $5,900 + $70 per plywood sheet for a 3,000sq feet roof (41 squares)... Home Depot wanted $11,500!?! The same thing with heating and cooling... outrageous prices compared to Northern Unionized States... As far as the quality and workmanship go: Please DON'T ASK!!!!!
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TURTLE wrote:

What do you expect?
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it.
This is Turtle.
Louisiana went Right to work and oil plant employees was averaging about $30.00 a hour at the time. Now 10 years later the average is about $22.00 a hour. They moved the unions out the door and hire and fire and move people in all parts of the plant with no job title except class 1 , 2 , 3 , or 4 workers. Also we were number 31 out of the 50 states in the education level of the average worker and now after 10 years of Right to work. We are Number 49 in education level of the average worker. I don't know who the number 50 is but i was told it might be Arkansas which is Right to work state too. If you want a good job / well -- pays a good living wage , you got to leave Louisiana to find one.
I think the Right to work deal should be like this : Right for Big Business to work.
TURTLE
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wrote:

Turtle:
I'm not from a "right-to-work" state so I'm not sure I get this. Around here, "right-to-work" means that they can't fire someone without just cause. Here we can fire anybody at any time with no recourse on their part.
What exactly does "right-to-work" mean down there ?
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Jimmy wrote:

Right-to-work has a universal meaning related to union shops. In non right-to-work states, if you work for a company that has a union shop, you must belong to the union (or in some case you just have to pay the dues) to work there. In a right-to-work state, a union shop can not force one to join the union as a prerequisite to working. Unions view right-to-work as union busting, because if you don't have to pays due why would one. The other side view the requirement to join the union as a prerequisite to work as a form of coercion or slavery. You get lot of BS from both sides so it is best to make up your own mind.
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and
unionized
as
This is Turtle.
Right to Work has nothing to do with firing a employee or he having a recource to fight back. They have now what is called the Equal Opportunity of Employment which will have the business explain why you fired a employee and the employee can fight back.
Alot of big businesses are moving the Union out the Door and starting there own unions called Federations. It's free and funded by the corperation it'self and well i will not go there. well just a little bit here. Right to work does mean that a corperation can sub- your job out to a non-union company and get rid of you and the union can not say a word about it. If the corperation sub's all the workers job out to a Sub contractor. they can fire every employee they have and replace them with non-union employees in one day if they care to do so. In non Right to work states, you can't sub out hourly workers job till they retire and then be replace with non-union subcontractor companys. I call it the "Right to do as they please with workers".
Right to Work means only that you don't have to joint the union if they have one or start one and move the union out the door if they please , basicly.
TURTLE
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see
How
Do both vents and turbines. They'll pay for themselves in lower AC bills in one season.
Turbines don't work when the wind is not blowing and ridge vents don't work in cold weather.
Double the amount of soffit vents you have and make sure they're unobstructed by attic insulation.
On a 3000' house, we have ridge vents and four turbines. It took me several week-ends of puttering to increase the soffit acreage.
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bills in

don't work

The purpose of ridge vents is to let the HEAT out. So What if they don't work in cold weather... if there is heat it will rise and escape thru the ridge!...
I don't think it is a good idea to mix the two, because you end up circulating the air just in the upper part of the attic!
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Note that in Florida if you have adequate insulation (and well insulated ductwork too) there isn't a significant energy savings associated with adding more ventilation. http://www.progress-energy.com/aboutenergy/learningctr/savingtips/atticsroofing.asp
I just researched the same question for a house in Florida with a tile roof. Assuming you are set on adding ventilation, then for your application I would recommend shingle-over ridge vents. Make sure that your roofer installs ONLY an approved vent system. In South Florida I would recommend that the system be approved for use in Miami-Dade. You can check out your options at http://www.miamidade.gov/buildingcode/pc-search_app.asp Look under Roofing / 07720 Ventilation.
To prevent water infiltration from wind-driven rain (and to make sure that the vents stay on in a hurricane) I would not use turbine vents. They aren't very waterproof - the testing that has been done on them requires that over 80mph the top be removed and a 'storm cap' be placed over the vent. Are you ready to jump up on the roof and do this anytime tornados are forecast? Didn't think so.
HTH.
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