Coaxial cable and phone wire installation

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(snip)

Cable as in 'coax cable'- a seperate issue from the decoder box. It amplifies trhe signal stength of whatever is going down the wire. I've never had any luck with them, personally.

room, from wherever the cable modem/router is, or just get a wireless cable modem/router, and a card for each PC. Most cable internet companies assume wireless these days, and discourage wired systems. Makes life easier for them.
Ir is there some other reason for this? I feel like this is

If you want wired ethernet, yeah, they need to be 'home run' to a central point. A wall-mount router or hub next to the telephone wiring, which should also be home-run instead of point-to-point, and then an upstream link to the server or cable modem.
aem sends...

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Properly installed coax runs normally do not need an amplifier unless there are more than 5 outlets per house. That number may vary from different providers based on the signal they push down the wire. Generally the cable company will sell and install an approved unit at a nominal cost if you need one. It is normally ageist their TOS for you to install an unapproved amplifier on their system.
Running the second cable to one room or a closet might be a good choice since you have no basement. If you have enough wire and want to run it to more than one room.that is okay also. The internet connection is split off the main line at the entry point and it and the TV signals travel separate lines.
The last time I bought this stuff, 11-04, I bought 1000 feet of cat5 and 500 feet of coax for $130 including tax. Overall wire is higher now but there is not a lot of copper in either of these. I completely did a small house and have enough left over for a couple of more. What I am saying is that if you buy it right, it may not matter how much you use. The labor is virtually the same either way.
Colbyt
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The labor issue is a big concern. I was sort of assuming the variable expense would be in the materials more than the labor. I assume that running 2 lines from point A to point B vs. 1 costs about the same. Meaning I need to plan this well so I don't have to have more lines run down the road -- thus my inquiries.
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Why can't you DIY? There are no licensing requirements since it all very low voltage stuff.
I would be happy to explain the process. Tool needs are minimal.
I suspect you are going to have a real case of sticker shock when you get a labor price. Nobody likes working in crawlspaces and most don't like snaking wire inside walls.
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

Depends on where you are. In CT one needs any of several classes of electrician's license (which require 2000 hours of supervised, documented work experience to get) or to be employed by a recognized telephone or cable company to install low-voltage cabling. This does not apply to homeowners working on their own residences.

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Peer and beam is pretty common around here so the expense shouldn't be too great. I'm not crazy about nosing around in my crawlspace. My attic is even worse. Only 4 feet of clearance in the very center and blown insulation everywhere. I'd love to get rid of that and start over with sheet. Another post perhaps...
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 23:37:52 -0500, crabshell
[snip]

In that case, you will need a big splitter at that single location. Splitters divide the signal so you get a weaker signal at each location. It may be too low, requiring an amplifier ahead of the splitter (better than amplifying each output separately). A 4 or 8 output amp is just an amp and a splitter in the same package.
Connect a cable modem before the amp.

Best to have your cable modem and router at this central location, and use CAT5 for distribution. It can be run alongside the cable to each room.
You mentioned wireless. A wired network will be simpler, faster, more secure, easier to set up (referring to computer configuration), and more reliable. When you're installing cable it would be a good time to put in network cables too.

No, because the CAT5 cables will all be run to one point. It's a good idea to put the network hub (along with modem and router) at the same location as the cable distribution point. Use that for telephone too.

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wrote:
[snip]

Which is probably an amplifier connected to a 1:4 or 1:8 splitter in the same package. This splitter will be a splitter like any other.

don't use a splitter, use a splitter instead :-)

You may not need an amplifier for the cable modem itself (the modem may even work better without one). Use a splitter on the incoming cable. Then the amplifier will be used only for cable.
[snip]
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#2. Not only ok to run side by side, but you can buy it as one cable.
http://www.cyberxlink.com/product_info.php/products_id/1103?osCsido9aa90088166e6d715c46b62290a5af
#3. Ok to go point to point if it doesn't interfere with other things. Avoid running parallel to electrical cables.
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"Crabshell" < snipped-for-privacy@nottoohotmale.com> wrote in message
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Avoid series runs for POTS, its way harder to troubleshoot when you have a problem, homeruns are the way to go!
Consider satellite for TV with its DVR digital video recorder service,
Elminates having to watch commercials ! it changes how you watch TV forever
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wrote:

YES! And there's a lot to that besides commercials (although it IS nice to be able to skip over some of the more offensive ones).
BTW, I've had a DVR for about 7 years and often don't know the time what I'm watching is on, or what channel.
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Since labor is likely to take the lion's share of your money, I'd seriously consider having an electrician take a look at your house and see what it would take to install grounded sockets, perhaps upgrade the service and add circuits where needed. Then the cost of doing the signal wiring at the same time will be minimized. I'd worry more about the electrical than the data.
Crabshell wrote:

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with our Dish DVR it doesnt matter when the show is on, or what time it gets moved too. the receiver automatically looks for the name and adjusts itself.
shows magically appear on a list of available ones.
A hour of prime time shows is 15 minutes of commercials which we skip. while a interesting scene or dirsurbance we can skip back and watch it again. dogs barrked, phone rang neigbor stopped by.
DVR is THE BEST device we ever added here!
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You must be watching old shows...
We have a DVR that I built which can remove commercials. It is not unusual to see some hour programs reduced to 35 minutes.
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wrote:

In most cases, the old shows are better.

It varies by show, many shows I've edited commercials from are 42-45 minutes per hour (52-56 minutes for PBS shows).
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wrote:

Or even what channel it's on, if set up properly on a DVR that supports it. I don't know about Dish, but ReplayTV calls that feature "theme channels" and TiVo calls it "wishlists".

Yes. Automatic channel selection on the receiver, is a necessary part of what a DVR does.

I wouldn't use the word "magically"*, but yes.

Approximately, on most channels. A PBS show is closer to 55 minutes per hour.

Also, TV shows and movies often involve things (signs, maps,...) you could read if you got to look at them long enough. You can actually read the wordy introductions to some movies.
BTW, I actually wished for something that would do that, for years before DVRs existed.

Yes. I've had one since 1999 and would NOT want to have to live without one. About the only time I watch TV without a DVR now is when I'm on the phone (or in a chat room) where people are discussing the show in real time.
&&&
* - many times, "magic" (NOT referring to stage magic but the "real" thing), and it's synonym "supernatural" are often used as excuses rather than explanations. The words have little or no meaning otherwise.
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

We start watching some shows like survivor 15 minutes after they begin. This enables us to FF thru commercials and be caught up to live at end of show.
Cant do that with a VCR
People without DVRs dont know what they are missing!
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wrote:

I guess you're using Outhouse Express :)

You actually can, by using 2 VCRs and switching between them. An extremely complex, error prone, and non-worthwhile procedure.

And a lot won't believe it when you tell them.
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Look what I started. I hardly have time to watch TV. In fact my attic antenna is looking better every day. The uncompressed signal looks great...

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On Sun, 25 Jun 2006 20:31:37 -0500, crabshell

I am not sure where you are now but if you want to put in grounded circuits for your TV, computer and such you should pull in a Romex while you are crawling around down there. Surge protectors are not as effective (or effective at all, some say) without a good ground. Take it all back to your service panel and the ground electrode for the system. Make sure the cable and phone company use the same electrode. No use wiring all this up and having it smoked the first time you have a thunderstorm.. I wouldn't tywrap thew power to the low voltage but don't get your panties in a wad if they are close together. Coax and Cat5 are very good at rejecting 60hz and the little spikes you may see on a Romex, particularly when it is dedicated to the same equipment the coax/cat5 is going to. In fact they make NMS cable with low voltage and line voltage in the same jacket.
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