CO gas from broiler


I just bought a CO detector, and wanted to try it on everything that burns. Neither my stove-top burners nor my oven produced any measurable CO. This made me a little suspicious until I tried my separate broiler. The reading on the meter reached 100 ppm within 45 minutes. Yes, I had thoroughly vented the house since testing the oven. The reading was confirmed by a second measurement a day later.
So I thought I could just adjust the oxygen mixture by opening the window on the gas line to the broiler. CO is the result of a rich mixture (not enough oxygen), right? But the window was already open all the way. So I thought I might as well try closing it down. This time the measurement reached 100 ppm even faster - about 30 minutes. I don't know if that time difference is scientifically significant; I didn't want to continue or repeat the experiment.
Is there anything other than the mixture adjustment that I should look at? Or is the burner damaged beyond repair? It does make a little sense that a burner that sits ABOVE the flame could be damaged, but I don't know if that would create CO.
Thanks, Della
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As Uncle Vernal used to say, 'If you can't lower the river, raise the bridge.' So to change your combustion ratio with a fixed air inlet, lower the gas flow. On some burner outlets, this can be adjusted by rotating the output nozzle. If the nozzle has a hex base this will fit a standard box wrench and turning a small amount clockwise will reduce gas flow. You may need some expert help on this, so check with repairclinic.com as one source. Your gas service may have higher than average pressure, and ranges are often equipped with an adjustable regulator to deal with problems of that kind. You gas supplier may be able to help in that case...give them a call. Good luck.
Joe
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Just leave it alone, its normal a brolier is a HIGH btu appliance, the higher the BTU the higher amount of CO2, leave window OPEN when using and be prepared for nuisance trips during brolier operations
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I assume you mean CO?
For the OP-
What are you cooking that needs to be BROILED for over 30 minutes?
JK

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Thanks to everyone for the replies.
Joe, yours was a great idea. Yet it seems like I only have one regulator for the entire stove/oven/broiler. I haven't yet been able to set aside the time to wait to a gas company employee to come out and check for another means of adjustment. I will soon.
Big_Jake, I don't need to broil anything for 30 minutes. I rarely broil at all. But I don't like the idea of an appliance that could surreptitiously hurt me. Even worse would be the situation in which I give this stove away, and it hurts someone else who doesn't have a CO detector.
Della
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