CO detectors read "10"

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zxcvbob wrote:

Nonsense. A reading of 10 has no meaning and many CO units can't detect anything under 25. Let the guy read is manual. No alarm is even sent unless the reading gets above 50 for a long period. A peak reading doesn't even begin until above 10. A reading of 10 has no meaning, except that the unit may have malfunctioned.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

What's the nonsense part? My CO detector is meaningful at about 11 or so. It also doesn't give peak readings; if I smoke up the basement, the CO reading goes up (15, or 20-something if it's really smoky) and then drops as I air it out. I told him not to worry about it, OTOH long-term exposure to low levels of CO, while not dangerous, can still cause malaise and flu-like symptoms.

BTW, the one time my detector went off and there actually was a dangerous level of CO, there was no smoky smell at all. CO was over 100 and rising rapidly.
Regards, Bob
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Phisherman wrote:

Read your manual. It doesn't mean anything and the detector can't detect a reading that low, so 10 is the same as 0. Mine read 10 for a while, went bonkers when the power went off, I replaced the battery (it ran down rather fast with the power off). Reads 0 all the time now. When you unplugged the thing did you take the battery out? If not, you need to and also replace the battery.
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Phisherman wrote:

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Update... I read the manual and called the manufacturer. The units that are showing 10ppm need to be replaced. The tech said to believe the new unit which reads zero. I've moved the new unit around the house and next to the others and it always stays at "0" even next to a unit reading "10."
According to OSHA a CO concentration of up to 50ppm for an 8-hour period is okay for a healthy individual. A concentration of 200ppm will cause nausea, headache, fatigue. A concentration of 800ppm will cause death in 2-3 hours. I know that when CO2 is present there is also a (much) smaller amount of CO present, both are colorless/odorless gases.
FYI: Common sources of CO include: Gas appliances not properly ventilated Using an oven for heating the house Using a propane or charcoal grill indoors Running a gasoline engine in an enclosed or partially-enclosed area Leaving a house door open to a garage that has a vehicle running
I appreciate all your responses and encourage everyone to have a CO detector in addition to a smoke detector on all levels of your home.

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Amazing what one can learn by RTFM, isn't it?
And yes, it is a good idea to have CO detectors.
BUT, get the ones that have the digital readouts. The other ones that scream only when the levels are high aren't as good. You might have levels low enough to give you headaches, but not low enough to set the alarm off. Or, it goes off after you have gone unconscious.
I have always pushed people towards the digital units.
It's your life. Spend a few extra bucks. A family of four we knew died after moving a generator into their garage. No one has a clue as to what they were thinking, but they're just as dead. (Happened in Las Vegas about a year ago.)
A CO detector, even the cheapo variety would have saved their lives.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

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cdc says: "Protect Your Family from a Silent Killer Take steps now to protect your family from the unseen danger of carbon monoxide. Install a carbon monoxide detector in your house, and plan to check its battery every time you check your smoke detector batteries. Carbon monoxide is odorless and colorless. If it builds up in your home it can cause illness or even death-more than 500 Americans are killed by carbon monoxide poisoning every year. Any heater that burns fuel, such as your furnace, gas water heater, or a portable butane or gas heater, can leak carbon monoxide and should be inspected every year. In addition to having a working carbon monoxide detector in your house, you should never burn anything in a stove or fireplace that isn't vented properly, never heat your house with a gas oven, and never run a generator in an enclosed space (like your basement) or outside a window where the exhaust could blow indoors, even if the power goes out. Carbon Monoxide Detector When you're driving, don't warm your car up in a closed garage. If your garage is attached to your house, close the door to the house even if you open the garage door while you warm up the car. And when it snows, be sure to clear any snow out of your car's tailpipe-if the pipe is blocked exhaust can back up inside your car. For more information on carbon monoxide poisoning, go to:" http://www.cdc.gov/co/default.htm
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Phisherman wrote:

As has been said;
1. 10 is very low 2. the detector holds its peak reading. You need to reset it to see what the current reading is. 3. I have attached garage. If I back in, the detector immediately goes through the roof as its in the basement just beneath where the garage butts the house. So if this is your case, pay attention to your cars and dont run them with garage door open.
--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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So if this is your case, pay attention to your cars

Huh?
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Steve B wrote:

Your honor, I can not recall saying that.
--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Stick one of those that read 10 outside for awhile. If it still reads 10, it's probably defective. If not, you better get some help. If all the appliances are shut off, I sure dont see where the CO would be coming from.

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On Thu, 09 Feb 2006 12:12:59 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Thanks. That's a good idea. I have the feeling that two detectors are needing replacements.
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